race and equity | KUOW News and Information

race and equity

Author Robin DiAngelo
Courtesy of Beacon Press

The term “white fragility” was coined by the Seattle-based educator and author Robin DiAngelo.

She defines it as “a state in which even a minimum amount of racial stress becomes intolerable, triggering a range of defensive moves. These moves include the outward display of emotions such as anger, fear and guilt, and behaviors such as argumentation, silence and leaving the stress-inducing situation.”

A walk in Seattle with my father, who was born a slave

Jul 12, 2018
Horace Cayton Jr., the author of Long Old Road, as an adult.
Library of Congress

Horace Cayton was an African-American sociologist born in Seattle in 1903. His father was born a slave; his mother was the daughter of the first black U.S. Congressman. This is an excerpt from his autobiography, The Long Old Road, published in 1963.

Seattle’s first black cop meets a killer over checkers

Jul 12, 2018
Horace Cayton was the first black deputy in Seattle.
KUOW Illustration/Teo Popescu

Horace Cayton was an African-American sociologist born in Seattle in 1903. His father was born a slave; his mother was the daughter of the first black U.S. Congressman. This is an excerpt from his autobiography, The Long Old Road, published in 1963.

Horace Cayton Jr., center, as an adult. Cayton worked many jobs before becoming an esteemed sociologist in Chicago — longshoreman and Seattle's first black deputy, among others.
Library of Congress

Horace Cayton was an African-American sociologist born in Seattle in 1903. His father was born a slave; his mother was the daughter of the first black U.S. Congressman. This is an excerpt from his autobiography, "The Long Old Road", published in 1963.

Boxed items are shown on conveyer belts leading to docks where they will be loaded onto trucks at an Amazon fulfillment center on Friday, November 3, 2017, in Kent.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Amazon’s Marketplace still contains products with racist messages, according to two watchdog groups.


Courtesy of Haymarket Books

Michael Bennett is a man who needs little introduction. He is famous as a professional football player, a philanthropist and an activist. Now, add author to the list. Bennett’s first book, written with journalist Dave Zirin, is ‘Things That Make White People Uncomfortable.’

The stars-and-bars of the Confederate flag painted onto a Juanita senior's face in 1999. Two years earlier, Juanita students shouted racial slurs at the mostly black Garfield High School football team. They sent an apology banner and students had to atten
KUOW Photo/Casey Martin

A Kirkland high school voted today, Thursday, on whether to drop their mascot: the Rebels.

The interior of the main sanctuary of Mount Zion Baptist Church is shown on Thursday, March 8, 2018, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

What started in the 19th Century as a group of people holding church services in their homes, grew into the city's largest African American congregation.

Mount Zion Baptist Church was incorporated in 1894. This week, Mayor Jenny Durkan signed an ordinance formally designating it a historic city landmark. The city council approved the designation in May.

A main corridor at the King County juvenile detention center in Seattle's Central District. This building will be demolished after the new facility is constructed.
KUOW PHOTO/ISOLDE RAFTERY

Zero youth detention.

It's King County's white whale, a promise and a term batted around without much explanation of what it even means. 


UNCODE: Storytellers

May 30, 2018
KUOW Photo/Lisa Wang

UNCODE: Storytellers
Tuesday, June 19
Doors at 6:30 pm, Show at 7:00 pm
Free, RSVP Here

In the wake of outrage over the April arrest of two black men in a Philadelphia store, Starbucks has closed 8,000 US stores for racial bias training.
Flickr Photo/Iain Farrell (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/dVJijp

If you went in search of a mid-afternoon pick-me-up, you may have come up empty-handed. Across the nation, Starbucks stores closed for a 4 hour training session on racial bias. 


KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

What would you do if a Starbucks barista refused to give you the bathroom code? Or refused to give it to your black friend?  

When this happened to two coworkers in Seattle, one was ready to let it slide.

Since the arrests of two black men at a Philadelphia Starbucks in April, several more instances have been documented of mostly white people calling the police on people of color for various reasons, none involving breaking the law — like sleeping in a dorm's common room, shopping, leaving an Airbnb or golfing too slowly.

This map shows the gun deaths of children and adolescents in King County between 2009 and 2018.
KUOW/Google Fusion Tables

Look at the map above. What do you notice?

Each red dot represents someone 18 or younger who died of a gunshot wound in King County in the last nine years.

A memorial for Charleena Lyles is shown outside of Solid Ground Brettler Family Place on Monday, June 19, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

It's been nearly a year since Seattle police officers shot and killed Charleena Lyles. 

Thursday, a panel of experts and a member of Lyles' family will gather at the University of Washington to talk about police violence and strategies to stop it. 


From left, peanuts, hog maw and chitterlings. These three dishes, as chef Edouardo Jordan explains, come from West Africa, and evolved during slavery in the Deep South.
JuneBaby Instagram/@junebabysea

Chef Edouardo Jordan brought major gold home to Seattle this week by winning two James Beard Awards. One for Best Northwest Chef, a recognition of his talent at his flagship restaurant Salare, and another for Best New Restaurant nationwide for the Ravenna eatery two blocks away, JuneBaby.

Edouardo Jordan, right, works in the kitchen at JuneBaby on Wednesday December 6, 2017, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle Chef Edouardo Jordan kept one item off his menu when he opened Salare in 2015.

“I didn’t want to put fried chicken on the menu,” Jordan said in the Netflix documentary series, “Ugly Delicious.”

Imani Sims is KUOW’s inaugural #NewsPoet – a program in which Pacific Northwest poets respond in verse to what the station airs. Below is an excerpt of her poem "Better than Captivity."


A main corridor at the King County Juvenile Detention in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Hear about those local clergy members who chained themselves to a construction site? They were protesting a new youth detention facility.

As you read this, new cinder block walls are rising up right next door to the old facility in Seattle’s Central District. The Children and Family Justice Center, its new name, is expected to be completed in 2020. 

Marijuana plants are shown in the flowering room at Grow Ambrosia in Seattle
KUOW Photos/Megan Farmer

A Seattle municipal court judge will decide if hundreds of marijuana convictions should be vacated after a request from Pete Holmes, the city attorney. 

If approved by the court, 542 people convicted of marijuana possession would have their records affected.

Elmer Dixon, left, laughs with Ben Abe, right, the current owner of the space where the Seattle Black Panther Party had their first office, while reminiscing about the location, on Wednesday, January 10, 2018, on 34th Avenue in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Madrona is a posh Seattle neighborhood with million-dollar homes. But 50 years ago, at the playground here, it was where hundreds of Black Panthers trained.

 


In 1965, Ralph and Elaine Hayes tried to put a down payment on a friend's home in Ravenna.

"And in April of '66 the United Federal Savings Bank, I think it was called, sent our check back," Elaine Hayes said. She and her husband didn't find out why for 15 years.


Brettler Family Place, part of the complex at Sand Point Housing.
Solid Ground

“Boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom.” Gunshots, no doubt, J.C. thought. 

Beezus Murphy, 13, poses for a portrait at her home on Tuesday, April 3, 2018, in Seattle.
KUOW photo/Megan Farmer

Eighth-grader Beezus Murphy has always loved Dr. Seuss.

Lawyers are more likely to strike people of color from their jury selection, research shows, making juries more white. The effect of predominantly white juries is well documented. 

Now Washington state’s highest court has adopted a new rule aimed at reducing this racial bias.


Today KUOW launches a new series celebrating Pacific Northwest writers. 

We invite local poets to write an original piece inspired by a KUOW news story.

It's called NewsPoet and our first is Seattle-based poet Imani Sims.

 

Seattle Black Panthers gather on the steps of the Capitol in Olympia on February 28, 1969, to protest a bill aiming to it a crime to exhibit firearms with 'an intent to intimidate others.'
Museum of History and Industry

Elmer Dixon walked up to the spot where the Black Panthers fortified a building against police attack and remembered the scene 50 years ago.


When young kids get reading right, it pays off later

Mar 23, 2018
Volunteer Anthony Lee reads with Elizabeth Riff on Wednesday, January 24, 2018, at Sanislo Elementary School in West Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Mondays and Wednesdays are exciting days for Elizabeth Riff at Sanislo Elementary School in West Seattle. That's when the 6-year-old meets with a tutor to practice her reading skills.

Seattle native Merlin Rainwater holds a map outlining the red line zone on Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Longtime Central District resident Merlin Rainwater advocates for alternative forms of transportation, like walking and biking. She leads neighborhood “slow rides” to get older women more comfortable with urban cycling and shows them around parts of the Central District they might not know about: public art, small parks, black-owned cafes and restaurants.

High school students attend 'Hamilton' at the Paramount in Seattle, 2018.
Courtesy of STG/Christopher Nelson

What if the first live theater you ever saw was "Hamilton"?

That was the experience of many of the 2,800 students from low-income high schools across the state who got to see the hottest show in town on a field trip.


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