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A panel at Garfield High School on Monday discusses the NAACP's proposal to require ethnic studies.
Jamala Henderson

Seattle’s NAACP chapter and some Seattle educators want ethnic studies to become required learning in the city's public schools.

On Monday, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, teachers, students and parents crowded into a medium-sized Garfield High School classroom to hear speakers talk about the proposal.

Benjamin Hunter at Mt. Zion Baptist Church
Courtesy of Seattle Colleges

For his 1967 speech “Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence,” Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote:

"We are now faced with the fact, my friends, that tomorrow is today. We are confronted with the fierce urgency of now. In this unfolding conundrum of life and history, there is such a thing as being too late. Procrastination is still the thief of time.”

Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor
Twitter

If you’re a person of color in this country, every day you might encounter oppression that remains from systems set in motion hundreds of years ago.

The inequity that results affects everything from jobs to education to housing to health care. Given our history, what would it take to really bring racial equity?


Seattle's Blue Ridge neighborhood was developed by William and Bertha Boeing through a federal loan guarantee that required homes be sold and occupied only by white people.
Courtesy of Seattle Civil Rights & Labor History Project

Seattle's neighborhoods and suburbs have long been segregated by race.

Quinton Morris, violin professor.
Courtesy of Quinton Morris

Quinton Morris is a violin virtuoso who wants to give back. The Seattle University teacher grew up in Renton and fondly remembers the support he got from the community. He says that encouragement is important for people of color who want to be classical musicians. Morris told Jamala Henderson how he was often discouraged.  

Dr. Pedro Noguera, educator and sociologist
gseis.ucla.edu

Dr. Pedro Noguera is a UCLA sociologist and an expert in urban education. He was in Seattle Tuesday night to speak about the ways educators and administrators can improve student achievement and get them more engaged in school. He told Patricia Murphy many Seattle-area suburban schools are struggling with that balance, but many are doing it right. 

Updated at 6:55 p.m. ET

A jury has sentenced to death the man who murdered nine people in a Charleston church basement in 2015.

The twelve jurors deliberated for about three hours before sentencing Dylann Roof, 22, to die. To impose the death penalty, they had to reach a unanimous decision.

Educator Jasen Frelot
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Many white parents have difficulty finding the right words to use when talking to their kids about racism. Preschool director Jasen Frelot runs workshops for white parents. He starts by telling those parents to sit with their discomfort.

The details of the story are unambiguously disturbing. Last week, a white 18-year-old man from suburban Chicago was found walking in the cold, disoriented and bloodied. Four people, all black, had held him against his will for four hours, tied him up, and assaulted him while livestreaming part of it on Facebook.

Professor Ralina Joseph at the University of Washington says to just start talking about race.
University of Washington

Why is race so hard to discuss? Ralina Joseph, founding director of the University of Washington’s Center for Communication, Difference, and Equity, talked about coded racial language, from Seattle liberals to Trump. This is a transcript from her interview, lightly edited for clarity.


In the kitchen at Oakland Avenue Urban Farm, just north of downtown Detroit, Linda Carter and Shawnetta Hudson are in the final stages of making their newest jam creation: cranberry-apple preserves. Carter is meticulously wiping down tables while Hudson seals the lids on jars. Then comes the logo — a beautiful graphic of a black woman with afro hair made of strawberries. The kitchen is small and basic, but for the past year it has served as the hub of a community-based product called Afro Jam.

Talladega College isn't known for its football team — because it doesn't have one. But it does have a band — the 200-member Marching Tornadoes. It is the pride of the campus in this small town about 50 miles east of Birmingham.

KUOW general manager Caryn Mathes
KUOW Photo

Journalism is so white.

That’s a criticism of newsrooms in America, and the numbers show that it’s true: In radio, just 9.4 percent of journalists are people of color.

Several civil rights activists were arrested Tuesday night for staging a sit-in at Sen. Jeff Sessions' office in Mobile, Ala., to protest his nomination as U.S. attorney general.

The sit-in was staged by the NAACP and portions were broadcast live online. The NAACP has sharply criticized Sessions' record on civil rights, voting rights and criminal justice reform.

I escaped Nazi Germany. I see its ideology alive in America today

Dec 30, 2016
Franz W. Wasserman, 96, lives in Seattle. He was 12 when Hitler rose to power in Germany.
Courtesy of Margie Bone

A call to action:

I was born in Munich, Germany, in 1920. I lived there during the rise of the Nazi Party and left for the U.S.A. in 1938. 

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