race

A coalition of Asian-American groups recently requested that the U.S. Department of Education investigate several Ivy League schools for discrimination. The group claims Asian-American applicants need higher SAT scores than other racial groups to get into these schools.

Do Asian-Americans face a different set of rules than everyone else? Youth Radio’s Amber Ly reports from San Francisco.

Read more on this story via Youth Radio

The nation's colleges and universities have been on pins and needles waiting for the U.S. Supreme Court to decide whether race can be a factor in their admissions policies.

And so today's 4-3 ruling upholding the affirmative-action program at the University of Texas at Austin brought a sigh of relief to much of the higher education world.

New Census numbers out Thursday reinforce a trend a you’ve probably noticed: The state’s population is booming. Washington ranks fifth for states that added the most new residents in the past year.

Mississippi officials are closing the investigation into the murder of three young civil rights workers by the Ku Klux Klan — more than 50 years after the men disappeared. The case had been closed for decades, then reopened after renewed public outcry. Now it's going cold again.

"It's just gotten to the point that it's 52 years later and we've done all we can do," Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood said Monday.

KUOW Photo / Feven Mekonenn

We all remember the influential teacher who made a difference in our lives. But for Drego Little, the teacher that changed his life was the one he hated most.


Jasmine Jackson (left) recommends events in Seattle, Alaina Caldwell (center) recommends restaurants, and Eula Scott Bynoe (right) interviews the people to know about.
Courtesy of 'Hella Black Hella Seattle'

Bill Radke speaks with Eula Scott Bynoe, Alaina Caldwell and Jasmine Jackson, the three women behind the Seattle-centric podcast Hella Black Hella Seattle. The podcast is a short-run summer series all about how people (especially people of color) can get out, have fun, and create community while the weather is warm.

The U.S. Men’s National Team poses ahead of a Copa America match against Paraguay on June 11.
AP Photo/Matt Rourke

The eyes of the soccer world are on Seattle this week for the COPA America Tournament. On Tuesday, a diverse crowd poured into CenturyLink field to watch the world’s top-ranked men’s national team, Argentina, take on Bolivia.

The U.S. Men's National Team plays in Seattle in a quarterfinal match Thursday night. Millions are expected to watch the game in the U.S.

Ricquel Sears of Capitol Hill with her 3-month-old daughter. For Sears, the Orlando shooting hit home. Her brother is gay, and her fiance is Muslim.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

At a vigil Sunday night, Seattleites shared their thoughts about the Orlando shooting that occurred earlier that morning. Ricquel Sears of Capitol Hill, who was at the park with her two children, said her heart dropped:

"My brother is homosexual. It sucks that you would kill someone just because of that. Not only one or two people, but you tried to kill over 100 people.


'Week in Review' panel Marcus Green, Knute Berger, Erica C. Barnett and Bill Radke.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray has a reputation for being a hothead. How should we react to his controversial behavior with city council members?

Also this week, we posted an essay by a Seattle University professor who had a racially-charged encounter in a Seattle Starbucks. Is this a racial story or a Seattle story?

About 40 people gathered outside Seattle Universtiy to support embattled dean Jodi Kelly, who has been placed on administrative leave. This is a hostile takeover type of situation, said Beth Derrig, who held a sign that said, We want the truth.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

About 40 people gathered outside Seattle University on Thursday afternoon in support of Jodi Kelly, dean of Matteo Ricci College.


Dr. Bob Hughes of Seattle University and Yoshiko Harden of Seattle Central. Hughes and Harden were meeting at a Starbucks on Broadway in Seattle when someone came in and unfurled a string of racial slurs and explicitives at Harden.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Last week we published an essay by Dr. Bob Hughes about a shocking experience at a Starbucks on Capitol Hill in Seattle.

Hughes was meeting with a colleague, Yoshiko Harden. A man came in and screamed racial slurs at the two college administrators, who are black. The man spit on them and then left.

The Washington National Cathedral says it will remove two images of the Confederate battle flag from the building's stained glass windows. Then the church will hold a period of public discussion on issues of race, slavery and justice and revisit the question of how to treat other depictions of the Civil War on the windows.

As the weather teeters between 1997 DJ Jazzy Jeff and 2002 Nelly, we've been spending a lot of time staring out the window, wishing to be anywhere but inside: the beach, the pool, the basketball court, Grand Teton National Park.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Jessie Grimes McQuarter in 1949. She won the Royal Esquire Club pageant two years in a row. Now 84, McQuarter lives in Covington.
Courtesy of J.C. Cook

A year ago, we published photos from the 1940s and 50s of black people in Seattle just living their lives.


Pages