Thanksgiving dinnr food
Flickr Photo/Dan Tentler (CC BY NC 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1SXlIOE

In advance of the Thanksgiving holiday, The Record brought in a panel to talk about some of the key issues happening in the news.

  • Race and justice issues provoked protests at college campuses in Washington state and all over the country this month. Students of color are calling for safer spaces on campus. 
  • The Seattle City Council said no to increasing parental leave from four weeks to 12.  
  • And how do you talk politics with your family on Thanksgiving?

Bill Radke talks over the news with Seattle City Councilmember Lorena Gonzalez, journalist Erica C. Barnett and University of Washington philosophy professor Michael Blake.

Other guests include Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer, Columbia journalism professor Todd Gitlin, and Lizzie Post, co-host of the podcast Amazing Etiquette.

Protests over racial discrimination on college campuses are leading to some swift responses and pledges of reform by college administrators. Even as the protests themselves appear to be quieting down ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday, activists are pledging a prolonged fight.

Western Washington University President Bruce Shepard said "this was hate speech."
Flickr photo/Joe Wolf (CC BY-ND 2.0)/HTTP://BIT.LY/1MQCGBG

Western Washington University canceled classes Tuesday after hate speech remarks popped up on social media and targeted students of color, school officials said.

University President Bruce Shepard told KUOW’s Bill Radke that the messages run "from simply the rude and ugly that you see trolls out there throwing around all the time to non-specific threats to specific threats.”

Update at 8:40 p.m. ET

Three people are in police custody after five people were injured last night as gunmen opened fire near the site of a Black Lives Matter protest in Minneapolis.

Early Tuesday afternoon, police arrested one man, saying in a press release: "A 23 year old white male was taken into custody in the City of Bloomington in relation to this case. His name will be released upon charging. The search for additional suspects continues."

‘The fear is real, yes, but that doesn’t mean you have to embrace it,’ says Bridgette Hempstead, who has worked with Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center to reach out to African Americans with cancer.
KUOW Photo/Mike Kane

Bill Radke talks to Bridgette Hempstead, about why she started Cierra Sisters, a cancer support group for African American women in South Seattle.

Bill Radke talks to Melanie McFarland, local writer and TV critic, about a time a stranger touched her hair at a bus stop and why incidents like this are a microaggression. 

The French flag flies over the Space needle on Saturday Nov. 14. It was one of several displays of solidarity with France in Seattle after the terrorist attacks on Nov. 13.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Does the Space Needle flying the French flag in solidarity with victims of the Paris terror attacks represent a racist monopoly on grief? Bill Radke talks with The Stranger's Charles Mudede.

University of Washington history professor Stephanie Smallwood at KUOW studios on Monday, Nov. 16, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Walk onto the University of Washington's Red Square and you are greeted by a giant statue of George Washington. A lot of students walk past that statue barely aware it's there.

But UW senior Palca Shibale told KUOW’s Bill Radke that Red Square is one place – but not the only one on campus – where she feels erased as a student of color.

Shibale, who is studying molecular biology, helped organize a rally last week in solidarity with students at the University of Missouri who protested the handling of racist incidents on campus.

In 1890, a shoemaker from Louisiana named Homer Plessy indentified himself as "black" on the decennial U.S. Census population survey. Plessy did this even though, as a Creole who was one-eighth black, he was light-skinned enough to pass for white.

Updated 6:10 p.m. ET

Amid continued pressure, the University of Missouri System President Tim Wolfe and the chancellor of the Columbia campus, R. Bowen Loftin, both tendered their resignations on Monday.

Wolfe announced his resignation this morning and by late afternoon, Loftin had followed suit, saying he would leave his post as chancellor at the end of this year.

"I take full responsibility for this frustration, and I take full responsibility for the inaction that has occurred," Wolfe said.

A group of University of Missouri faculty plan to walk out of their classrooms for the next two days to "stand in solidarity with the Mizzou student activists who are advocating for racial justice on our campus."

The news comes a day after some football players said they would not play another game until university system President Tim Wolfe steps down.

About 30 University of Missouri football players have said they will not play another game until university system President Tim Wolfe steps down.

The football players said that they were standing in solidarity with the Concerned Student 1950 movement, which has for months now called on the university to seriously address systemic racism on campus.

The team tweeted a picture of the student athletes linking arms. "We are no longer taking it," the tweet said. "It's time to fight."

There's been lots of talk over the past few years about the glaring lack of diversity in Silicon Valley's tech industry. Software engineer Leslie Miley made national news this week when he publicly explained his recent decision to leave his job at Twitter — a job he loved — citing frustration over the company's overwhelmingly white workforce and internal resistance to changing it.

Sesame seared Ahi tuna at Elliot's in Seattle. This was taken in 2011, how has the city's food evolved?
Flickr Photo/Mubnii M. (CC BY ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1kdJiMj

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Seattle restaurateur Rachel Yang about how the tech industry and increased diversity are changing the cuisine of the city.  

Sportswear giant Adidas announced Thursday that it would offer free design resources and financial assistance to any high schools that want to change their logo or mascot from Native American imagery or symbolism.

The company announced the initiative ahead of the Tribal Nations Conference at the White House, which Adidas executives attended.