public health

King County's Board of Health is pushing for better enforcement of gun confiscation laws.

In Washington, people subject to restraining orders can be required to surrender their guns. Those cases often involve domestic violence. Law enforcement agencies are supposed to have a process to collect the firearms.

But the Board of Health says that in King County it's not always done effectively, and that causes a public health risk.

Alfonoso Adinolfi at his office in Kent. Like many Americans with hepatitis C, Adinolfi didn't know he carried the virus until he was diagnosed in 1996.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

Ask Alfonso Adinolfi how he got hepatitis C and he’ll point to his upper right arm. “Right there,” he says, “that tattoo.”

He’s lived with the blood-borne virus for decades since being infected, possibly with a dirty tattoo needle. He's one of about 10,000 baby boomers in King County who are thought to have hep C, though many may not know it. So if you were born between 1945 and 1965, Seattle-King County Public Health wants you to get tested.

Some Northwest lawmakers want to make it harder for parents to opt out of vaccinating their children.

Flickr Photo/CDC Global (CC_BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Dr. Scott Lindquist about Ebola preparedness in Washington state. Lindquist is Washington state's communicable disease epidemiologist.

Flickr Photo/Steve Johnson (CC BY 2.0)

There’s E. coli in the water again on Mercer Island. The island's 62 restaurants  have been ordered to close and people are being told to boil their water for the second time in a week. Schools say they’ll remain open.

Ebola Dallas
AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez

A Liberian man is being treated for Ebola in Dallas, the first confirmed case of the disease in the US. Doctors in Dallas initially failed to recognize the virus when the man came in for treatment and released him with antibiotics.

KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

Fifteen children, ages 6 months to 14 years, are being treated at Seattle Children's Hospital for a severe respiratory illness known as entero virus.

Flickr Photo/Wheeler Cowperthwaite (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Dr. Matthew Golden about HIV infection rates in King County. Golden directs the HIV/STD control program at King County Public Health.

A bill in the state Legislature would prevent people under age 18 from buying vaping products
Flickr Photo/Joseph Morris (CC-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with Dr. David Fleming, director of King County Public Health, about the Food and Drug Administration's decision to regulate electronic cigarettes.

Flickr Photo/Eric E Johnson (CC-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde finds our more about a plan by Seattle & King County Public Health to make restaurant health inspection results more visible with Becky Elias, who runs the food protection program.

Flickr Photo/Jon Rawlinson (Cc-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with Mitchell Warren about the breakthroughs and challenges of HIV prevention over the last 30 years. Warren is the executive director of AVAC, an international non-governmental organization that works on HIV prevention.

Warren said that one of the greatest breakthroughs in HIV-AIDS prevention was the rise of the citizen activism that pushed for funding, creativity and urgency in research. "AIDS really changed how research happened," he said. "Science changed because communities ‘acted up.’"

Feeling Sick? Flu Season Is In Full Swing

Jan 6, 2014
Flickr Photo/cassie_jean

Marcie Sillman hears from Dr. Jeffrey Duchin, chief of communicable disease epidemiology and immunization for Public Health in Seattle and King County, about this year's flu season.

Public health officials say recent measles cases in the Northwest highlight the need to be vaccinated against the infection.

Health officials across the Northwest are trying to figure out why they’re seeing a big upswing in the number of people with gonorrhea this year.

Washington announced Thursday five counties are in the midst of an outbreak of the infection.

For years, researchers have been connecting the dots between socioeconomic status and obesity rates. A new study from the University of Washington makes those connections even stronger.

The study, published in the International Journal of Obesity looked at nearly 60,000 men and women in King County. It found that people in South and Southeast King County were much more likely to be obese. The biggest factors were education levels and home values.

Adam Drewnowski is the study’s lead author. He’s a professor of epidemiology at the University of Washington and the director of the UW’s Center for Public Health Nutrition. He talks with Marcie Sillman.

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