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protests

A group of University of Missouri faculty plan to walk out of their classrooms for the next two days to "stand in solidarity with the Mizzou student activists who are advocating for racial justice on our campus."

The news comes a day after some football players said they would not play another game until university system President Tim Wolfe steps down.

About 30 University of Missouri football players have said they will not play another game until university system President Tim Wolfe steps down.

The football players said that they were standing in solidarity with the Concerned Student 1950 movement, which has for months now called on the university to seriously address systemic racism on campus.

The team tweeted a picture of the student athletes linking arms. "We are no longer taking it," the tweet said. "It's time to fight."

People walk in the May Day labor march in Seattle on Friday, May 1, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Greater Seattle is known as home to some of the world’s most successful corporations including Microsoft and Amazon. But it's also home to some of the most vigorous anti-capitalist protests in the United States. What’s going on here?

People walk in the May Day labor march in Seattle on Friday.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

A protest organized by anarchists erupted in violence Friday evening on Capitol Hill following a separate peaceful May Day march to downtown Seattle, police said.

Seattle police said on Twitter that 16 people were arrested and three officers were injured in clashes during a protest on Capitol Hill that was billed on anarchist sites as an anti-capitalist march.

Police said pepper spray was used after the crowd failed to heed an order to disperse at Broadway and Howell Street and protesters threw rocks. (See photos in Storify below.)

A protester of the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, holds up a sign reading "No justice, no peace" -- a popular slogan.
Flickr Photo/Shawn Semmler (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with language journalist Ben Zimmer about the varied interpretations of the popular protest slogan, "No justice, no peace."

Marcie Sillman talks with non-violence trainer Jonathan 'Globe' Lewis about practicing non-violence. Also, Sillman speaks with University of Washington communications professor David Domke about civil rights and how King County can live up to its namesake. 

Germany's anti-immigrant movement spooks the country's leaders

Jan 6, 2015
Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

Everyone wants to come to Germany. 

That, at least, is the way some Germans see it. Germany is among the most prosperous countries in the world and, "after the United States, Germany has become the second most important destination country," according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Several hundred demonstrators gathered outside Seattle’s CenturyLink Field Sunday just as the Seahawks game against the San Francisco 49ers was getting underway. The crowd chanted "Twelfth man can't breathe! Twelfth man can't breathe!" They were protesting recent police shootings of unarmed black civilians in Ferguson and elsewhere.

Protesters in a march to the federal courthouse on Tuesday, Nov. 25, the day after a grand jury declined to indict Darren Wilson for Michael Brown's death.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Ross Reynolds talks with Lisa Daugaard, policy director for the Public Defender Association in Seattle, about business organizations' petitions for the city to require protesters to get permits first.

Political protest mixed with holiday festivities in Salem Wednesday.

Demonstrators at a Seattle march on Nov. 25, 2014, in response to the Ferguson grand jury decision.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Marcie Sillman speaks with Sarah Stuteville, co-founder of the Seattle Globalist, about protester concerns about policing in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood.

Low-wage workers picketed and rallied across the country Thursday in support of a $15 per hour minimum wage.

"This fight ain't over. It's just begun. I'm determined to get justice for my husband," Esaw Garner said Wednesday, "because he shouldn't have been killed in that way. He shouldn't have been killed in any way."

On Sunday, five St. Louis Rams players jogged onto the field with their arms raised by their heads, a stream of fog behind them: hands up, don't shoot.

The players — Tavon Austin, Kenny Britt, Jared Cook, Chris Givens and Stedman Bailey — were invoking the gesture that's been widely used in protesting the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown by police officer Darren Wilson. This followed the announcement that a grand jury would not indict Wilson in Brown's death, and the release of a hefty batch of evidence shown to the jury by St. Louis prosecutor Robert McCullough.

Amid rain showers and a tornado watch, police in Ferguson, Mo., made dozens of arrests Monday afternoon and into the evening of people who had gathered to protest the fatal shooting of Michael Brown, the black 18-year-old who was killed by a white police officer in August.

Manuel Valdes

May Day was supposed to be huge in Seattle this year. Television crews dispatched choppers. Police officers stood at almost every corner, poised for action. It was hot, about 88 degrees, a perfect day for a march.

Post-Chavez Venezuela: A Political House Of Mirrors

Mar 3, 2014
AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Steve Scher talks with Jose Antonio Lucero, chair of Latin American and Caribbean Studies at the University of Washington, about the protests in Venezuela.

There's a sad symmetry to the news from Venezuela, where anti-government protests in recent weeks have been fueled in part by outrage over the shooting death of a beauty queen — a death that underscored that nation's struggle to control violent crime.

One of the five people killed this week during protests against the socialist government of President Nicolas Maduro, it's now being reported, was another young beauty queen.

Flickr Photo/Christiaan Triebert (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with Yulia Shadirya about the protests in Ukraine. Shadirya moved to Seattle years ago but has been following the events in Kiev.

Flickr Photo/Ivan Bandura

Ross Reynolds talks with Scott Radnitz about why Ukrainians have been protesting in the streets of Kiev for the last three months. Radnitz is an associate professor and director of the Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies at the University of Washington.

AP Photo/Sergei Chuzavkov

Violent protests in Ukraine have spread beyond the capital, Kiev, as President Viktor Yanukovych held a meeting with three opposition leaders to try to end the unrest.  The governor of Lviv, in the west, was forced to sign his resignation as protesters stormed his offices.

The remaining members of the punk rock band Pussy Riot have been released from prison in Russia, a few months short of serving their full two-year sentences for "hooliganism" — a charge that the band's supporters say was just a trumped-up effort to quash free speech.

AP Photo/Amr Nabil

Ross Reynolds talks with Christian Science Monitor Cairo correspondent Kristen Chick about Mohamed Morsi's trial, Kerry's visit to Egypt and protests within the country.

Crows may be smart, but they are not beloved. Seattleites reported they would spend money to see fewer of them.
Flickr Photo/Lucina M

The Crow: A Common, Uncommon Bird

They’re big, noisy and everywhere. But crows are much more than cackling flocks. They recognize people, they mate for life and they pant like dogs when they’re hot. A commonly seen bird, maybe – but crows are not common in their abilities. Steve Scher talks with John M. Marzluff, professor of Wildlife Science at the University of Washington, and Tony Angell, a freelance artist and writer about their collaborative book, “In the Company of Crows and Ravens” and the wonders of these mysterious birds.

Steve Earle Makes Protest Music With A 21st Century Twang

Musician Steve Earle was raised in Texas. Earle’s music isn’t afraid to take on politics, and it does so with a 21st century attitude. Steve Earle joined us in 2007.

Punk Rock Founder: Patti Smith

Two young twenty-somethings with no money and a lot of ambition moved to New York City. They wanted to be artists, but they weren't sure what kind. She was his muse. He was hers. She was Patti Smith. She went on to become one of the founders of punk rock. He was Robert Mapplethorpe. He became a famous photographer. He died of AIDS in 1989. Patti Smith tells the story of their 20-year relationship in her new book "Just Kids." Steve Scher talked with Patti Smith in 2010.

Demonstrators Have Their Say On May Day

May 1, 2013
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

KUOW reporter Amy Radil began her day at Westlake Park.

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

City police departments often have testy relations with their local superheroes, at least in the movies. In "The Amazing Spider-Man" they issue a warrant for his arrest. In "The Dark Knight Rises," a cop pledges to take down Batman.

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