protests

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Several hundred demonstrators gathered outside Seattle’s CenturyLink Field Sunday just as the Seahawks game against the San Francisco 49ers was getting underway. The crowd chanted "Twelfth man can't breathe! Twelfth man can't breathe!" They were protesting recent police shootings of unarmed black civilians in Ferguson and elsewhere.

Protesters in a march to the federal courthouse on Tuesday, Nov. 25, the day after a grand jury declined to indict Darren Wilson for Michael Brown's death.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Ross Reynolds talks with Lisa Daugaard, policy director for the Public Defender Association in Seattle, about business organizations' petitions for the city to require protesters to get permits first.

Political protest mixed with holiday festivities in Salem Wednesday.

Demonstrators at a Seattle march on Nov. 25, 2014, in response to the Ferguson grand jury decision.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Marcie Sillman speaks with Sarah Stuteville, co-founder of the Seattle Globalist, about protester concerns about policing in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood.

Low-wage workers picketed and rallied across the country Thursday in support of a $15 per hour minimum wage.

"This fight ain't over. It's just begun. I'm determined to get justice for my husband," Esaw Garner said Wednesday, "because he shouldn't have been killed in that way. He shouldn't have been killed in any way."

On Sunday, five St. Louis Rams players jogged onto the field with their arms raised by their heads, a stream of fog behind them: hands up, don't shoot.

The players — Tavon Austin, Kenny Britt, Jared Cook, Chris Givens and Stedman Bailey — were invoking the gesture that's been widely used in protesting the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown by police officer Darren Wilson. This followed the announcement that a grand jury would not indict Wilson in Brown's death, and the release of a hefty batch of evidence shown to the jury by St. Louis prosecutor Robert McCullough.

Amid rain showers and a tornado watch, police in Ferguson, Mo., made dozens of arrests Monday afternoon and into the evening of people who had gathered to protest the fatal shooting of Michael Brown, the black 18-year-old who was killed by a white police officer in August.

Manuel Valdes

May Day was supposed to be huge in Seattle this year. Television crews dispatched choppers. Police officers stood at almost every corner, poised for action. It was hot, about 88 degrees, a perfect day for a march.

Post-Chavez Venezuela: A Political House Of Mirrors

Mar 3, 2014
AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Steve Scher talks with Jose Antonio Lucero, chair of Latin American and Caribbean Studies at the University of Washington, about the protests in Venezuela.

There's a sad symmetry to the news from Venezuela, where anti-government protests in recent weeks have been fueled in part by outrage over the shooting death of a beauty queen — a death that underscored that nation's struggle to control violent crime.

One of the five people killed this week during protests against the socialist government of President Nicolas Maduro, it's now being reported, was another young beauty queen.

Flickr Photo/Christiaan Triebert (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with Yulia Shadirya about the protests in Ukraine. Shadirya moved to Seattle years ago but has been following the events in Kiev.

Flickr Photo/Ivan Bandura

Ross Reynolds talks with Scott Radnitz about why Ukrainians have been protesting in the streets of Kiev for the last three months. Radnitz is an associate professor and director of the Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies at the University of Washington.

AP Photo/Sergei Chuzavkov

Violent protests in Ukraine have spread beyond the capital, Kiev, as President Viktor Yanukovych held a meeting with three opposition leaders to try to end the unrest.  The governor of Lviv, in the west, was forced to sign his resignation as protesters stormed his offices.

The remaining members of the punk rock band Pussy Riot have been released from prison in Russia, a few months short of serving their full two-year sentences for "hooliganism" — a charge that the band's supporters say was just a trumped-up effort to quash free speech.

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