Proposition 1

Flickr Photo/Stephen Rees (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with the Washington Policy Center's Bob Pishue about why he says King County Metro Transit should manage its budget better rather than cut bus service. King County voters rejected Metro's Proposition 1 in the special election last week.

Flickr Photo/Canadian Pacific

UPDATE: 4/25/14, 4:15 p.m. PT.

Votes are still being tallied, but King County voters so far are rejecting Proposition 1. That almost certainly means cuts to buses.

A new Seattle-only initiative will try to save buses inside city limits. A group called Friends of Transit said it filed the initiative with the Seattle City Clerk's Office Friday.

Flickr Photo/Oran Viriyincy (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Mark Hallenbeck, director of Washington State Transportation Center, about the impact of the vote on Proposition 1.

Flickr Photo/clappstar (CC BY-NC-ND)

Even before the Washington State Legislature failed to pass a transportation funding package this session, King County Executive Dow Constantine announced the county would not wait for the state.

Constantine said King County would go it alone and ask its voters to pay more money for King County Metro Transit and for road projects.

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Low-income transit passengers say the last few years have been difficult in King County with multiple fare increases and the end of the ride free zone in Seattle. But they are torn about whether to support Proposition 1, which would raise taxes in order to maintain existing Metro transit service.

Flickr Photo/clappstar (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Kirkland Mayor Amy Walen about why the city voted to support the transportation funding measure despite reservations.

Flickr Photo/John Boren (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Washington state has the nation’s highest minimum wage at $9.19 an hour. If voters in the City of SeaTac approve Proposition 1 next Tuesday, the city would boast the highest minimum wage in the country.

Opponents of the proposition say that although the purpose of the proposition is to provide higher-paying jobs, its real consequence would be fewer jobs and more competition from workers from nearby cities.

Flickr Photo/Canadian Pacific

This November voters in the city of Seattle will have a chance to decide whether or not City Council races should be publicly funded. Proposition 1 would create a program that funnels public money to candidates who decide to opt in to the program. To qualify, prospective candidates have to receive donations of at least $10 from 600 voters. If they do, they will receive six public dollars for every one dollar they raise up to $210,000 dollars.