privacy

UW Students Learn To Hack For Your Safety

Nov 14, 2013
Flickr Photo/Alexandre Dulaunoy

What do kids who play capture the flag on summer breaks do when they grow up and go to college? Turns out, the same thing – only the game evolves to computer security and privacy puzzles in a trend that’s being called “ethical hacking.”

Flickr Photo/Chris Hardie

Steve Scher talks with Washington Representative Susan DelBene about USA Freedom Act which could limit the NSA's ability to collect data in the US.

Flickr Photo/James Joel

The continuing drip of revelations about NSA spying continues to provoke outrage around the world.  Harvard historian and New Yorker staff writer Jill Lepore puts that outrage in historical context. She tells The Record's David Hyde that the modern concept of a right to privacy is a relatively new concept. And Lepore says the assertion of privacy rights always follows the rise of new technologies that have already invaded our privacy.

Michael Clinard

We’ve all seen them: cute baby pictures in our Facebook, Instagram or Twitter feeds. For many parents, it’s hard to resist the temptation to share just how adorable their kid looks in their first rain boots or winter hat. But some are saying parents should pause before hitting that "share" button. Marcie Sillman talks with Amy Webb about why she doesn’t post anything about her daughter online.

Flickr Photo/Jeni Rodger

Facebook and Yahoo have joined Microsoft and Google in asking the Federal Intelligence Surveillance Court for permission to tell the public about personal information they give to spy agencies.

The big four companies are responding to persistent reports that spy agencies are using them to grab users’ personal information.

In the FISA court filings, Microsoft, Facebook, Yahoo and Google say their reputations have been damaged. They say only a small part of Internet traffic is being handed to spy agencies, and they want to give the public information to correct the record.

The Justice Department says it can’t allow that for national security reasons.

The companies say that gag order violates their free-speech rights. Microsoft and Google are asking the FISA court to allow oral arguments so that they can argue their case in public.

Somewhere, out there, is a profile of you. A file containing information about who you hang out with, what music you listen to and what you like to buy. APM's Stacey Vanek Smith went diving to find out what marketing companies knew about her. The two words that bothered her the most: "markedly single."

AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

"When the American people find out how their government has secretly interpreted the Patriot Act, they are going to be stunned, and they are going to be angry," said Oregon Senator Ron Wyden on the Senate floor in May, 2011. He was referencing the National Security Agency’s secret surveillance program.

Biographies In The Age Of Email

Aug 7, 2013
Flickr Photo/pennstatenews

For centuries, biographers relied on handwritten letters to bring historical figures to life, from Ghandi to Catherine The Great. But email, texts and Outlook have changed how historians work. For example, we know from emails how Microsoft executives reacted to Apple’s early success with iTunes: “We were smoked.”

Full list of stories from KUOW Presents, August 7:

This post was last updated at 2 p.m. ET

The White House says it is "extremely disappointed" in Russia's decision to grant a temporary one-year asylum to NSA leaker Edward Snowden.

Snowden left Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport on Thursday after spending more than a month holed up in its transit center. Anatoly Kucherena, a Russian lawyer who has been advising the former U.S. intelligence contractor, told Russian media that Snowden's whereabouts are being kept secret for security reasons.

The Obama administration's displeasure was clear:

NSA: America’s Most Secret Agency

Jul 31, 2013
AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

For 31 years journalist James Bamford has been writing about the National Security Agency and the threats he sees it posing to our privacy. Even after all the recent revelations about NSA spying on citizens, the agency knows much more than you think. The NSA listens in while Ross Reynolds and Bamford discuss the role of government surveillance.

The National Security Agency declassified more documents that shed light on formerly secret programs that collect a vast amount of metadata on the phone calls made in the United States, as well as the electronic communication of foreigners.

In a statement, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper said the release was "in the public interest."

Freedom Foundation Fishing For Search Terms

Jul 11, 2013

The Olympia-based Freedom Foundation has filed records requests with four Washington state agencies asking for employee emails and other records containing certain words, including “tea party,” “Catholic,” “Mormon” and “redneck.” Why? Ross Reynolds talks with Glen Morgan, the property rights director with the Freedom Foundation.

From Hari Kondabolu's Facebook page.

What Are The Privacy Concerns Over Facebook’s Graph Search?
Throughout its lifespan, Facebook has been all about change -- a seemingly endless overhaul of its design and how the site functions. But here’s something that’s remained steady: complaints from users about privacy. Facebook’s latest innovation is called graph search. It allows users to comb their friends’ Facebook pages and public pages to find specific answers to specific questions. Since rolling out this week, graph search is raising concerns about privacy. So what are they? And how can Facebook users lock down data that they don’t want to be shared?

Comedian Hari Kondabolu
A couple of times throughout the year comedian Hari Kondabolu makes the trip from New York to Seattle to test out his material in front of the local audience. When he is not working on stand-up he is writing for and appearing on the FX show Totally Biased With W. Kamau Bell as well as recording a podcast with his brother called The Untitled Kondabolu Brothers Podcast.  In his stand-up, Hari works through issues like racism, sexism, immigration and gentrification, challenging the audience as much as entertaining them. He joins us to discuss his work.

Radio Retrospective: Rocky Jordan
We look back at the show Rocky Jordan from radio’s Golden Age. Rocky runs a bar. He also runs into trouble every episode. The show is one of many Golden Age detective dramas featuring characters that aren’t detectives!  It also happens to be Steve Scher’s favorite drama recently.

Recommended Eating
Food writer Sara Dickerman joins us with a lunch recommendation. Prefer to cook for yourself? She also has a pick for a great cookbook!

The Silk Road: Online's Wild West

Jun 20, 2013

   Based on recent reports by the Guardian and intelligence leaks by former CIA employee Edward Snowden, it’s clear that the federal government can track online activity pretty easily. But there’s also a mysterious far-off corner of the internet, one that’s much harder to track. It’s a place where people go to buy illegal drugs and even dangerous weapons. And they pay for all of it in electronic currency. Andy Greenberg, Forbes Magazine writer, tells David Hyde about this online black market, also known as the Silk Road.  Greenberg is author of the book "This Machine Kills Secrets," a chronicle of the history and future of information leaks, from the Pentagon papers to Wikileaks and beyond. 

Rep. Suzan Delbene Advocates For Stricter Electronic Privacy

Jun 19, 2013

  If the government wants to look at your mail, it needs a warrant. But there are no similar protections for your email. US representative Suzan Delbene from Washington state wants to change that. Support for stricter electronic privacy has been growing since the recent controversies over widespread government surveillance. Representative Delbene talks to David Hyde about her bill to reform the Electronic Privacy Act (PDF).

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