privacy

Government Surveillance
11:51 am
Wed July 31, 2013

NSA: America’s Most Secret Agency

National Security Administration campus in Fort Meade, Md.
AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

For 31 years journalist James Bamford has been writing about the National Security Agency and the threats he sees it posing to our privacy. Even after all the recent revelations about NSA spying on citizens, the agency knows much more than you think. The NSA listens in while Ross Reynolds and Bamford discuss the role of government surveillance.

National Security Agency
9:35 am
Wed July 31, 2013

U.S. Declassifies Documents About Surveillance Programs

A new National Security Agency data center is set to open in Bluffdale, Utah, in the fall.
George Frey Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 12:01 pm

The National Security Agency declassified more documents that shed light on formerly secret programs that collect a vast amount of metadata on the phone calls made in the United States, as well as the electronic communication of foreigners.

In a statement, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper said the release was "in the public interest."

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Privacy
12:10 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Freedom Foundation Fishing For Search Terms

The Olympia-based Freedom Foundation has filed records requests with four Washington state agencies asking for employee emails and other records containing certain words, including “tea party,” “Catholic,” “Mormon” and “redneck.” Why? Ross Reynolds talks with Glen Morgan, the property rights director with the Freedom Foundation.

Facebook And Comedy
5:06 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Privacy On Facebook, Comedian Hari Kondabolu, And Rocky Jordan

Comedian Hari Kondabolu joins KUOW in studio.
From Hari Kondabolu's Facebook page.

What Are The Privacy Concerns Over Facebook’s Graph Search?
Throughout its lifespan, Facebook has been all about change -- a seemingly endless overhaul of its design and how the site functions. But here’s something that’s remained steady: complaints from users about privacy. Facebook’s latest innovation is called graph search. It allows users to comb their friends’ Facebook pages and public pages to find specific answers to specific questions. Since rolling out this week, graph search is raising concerns about privacy. So what are they? And how can Facebook users lock down data that they don’t want to be shared?

Comedian Hari Kondabolu
A couple of times throughout the year comedian Hari Kondabolu makes the trip from New York to Seattle to test out his material in front of the local audience. When he is not working on stand-up he is writing for and appearing on the FX show Totally Biased With W. Kamau Bell as well as recording a podcast with his brother called The Untitled Kondabolu Brothers Podcast.  In his stand-up, Hari works through issues like racism, sexism, immigration and gentrification, challenging the audience as much as entertaining them. He joins us to discuss his work.

Radio Retrospective: Rocky Jordan
We look back at the show Rocky Jordan from radio’s Golden Age. Rocky runs a bar. He also runs into trouble every episode. The show is one of many Golden Age detective dramas featuring characters that aren’t detectives!  It also happens to be Steve Scher’s favorite drama recently.

Recommended Eating
Food writer Sara Dickerman joins us with a lunch recommendation. Prefer to cook for yourself? She also has a pick for a great cookbook!

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Online Silk Road
11:13 am
Thu June 20, 2013

The Silk Road: Online's Wild West

   Based on recent reports by the Guardian and intelligence leaks by former CIA employee Edward Snowden, it’s clear that the federal government can track online activity pretty easily. But there’s also a mysterious far-off corner of the internet, one that’s much harder to track. It’s a place where people go to buy illegal drugs and even dangerous weapons. And they pay for all of it in electronic currency. Andy Greenberg, Forbes Magazine writer, tells David Hyde about this online black market, also known as the Silk Road.  Greenberg is author of the book "This Machine Kills Secrets," a chronicle of the history and future of information leaks, from the Pentagon papers to Wikileaks and beyond. 

Privacy Laws
11:27 am
Wed June 19, 2013

Rep. Suzan Delbene Advocates For Stricter Electronic Privacy

  If the government wants to look at your mail, it needs a warrant. But there are no similar protections for your email. US representative Suzan Delbene from Washington state wants to change that. Support for stricter electronic privacy has been growing since the recent controversies over widespread government surveillance. Representative Delbene talks to David Hyde about her bill to reform the Electronic Privacy Act (PDF).

National Intelligence Agencies
4:24 am
Fri June 7, 2013

'Profound Questions About Privacy' Follow Latest Revelations

The National Security Agency's headquarters in Fort Meade, Md.
NSA Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 9:32 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': Glenn Greenwald on the data spy agencies are collecting
  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Dina Temple-Raston
  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Larry Abramson on the nation's secret court

Fresh reports about the massive amount of electronic data that the nation's spy agencies are collecting "raise profound questions about privacy" because of what they say about how such information will be collected in the future, NPR's Dina Temple-Raston said Friday on Morning Edition.

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Internet Privacy
12:04 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

How Are You Being Watched?

Flickr Photo/g4ll4is

You are under surveillance when you go online. The information gatherers include the government, advertising companies and brokers who sell your data. Christopher Soghoian, chief technologist for the national ACLU, explains that the constantly updating world of technology has  also changed the government's ability to spy Internet communications and mobile telephones.  

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Listener Call-In
11:59 am
Wed May 8, 2013

Do You Care About The Private Lives Of Public Officials?

Former South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford gives his victory speech after winning back his old congressional seat in the state's 1st District on May 7, 2013, in Mt. Pleasant, SC.
AP Photo/Rainier Ehrhardt

Yesterday, Mark Sanford was elected congressman from South Carolina’s 1st District. Last time Sanford was in the public spotlight, it was for an affair he had with a woman from Argentina. Sanford certainly is not the first public official to make a comeback following a scandal. Do you care about public officials’ private lives? Ross Reynolds takes your calls.

Safety And Privacy
5:43 pm
Wed March 20, 2013

Colorado Murder Resonates With Local Public Officials

Credit KUOW Photo / Sara Lerner

The executive director of the Colorado Department of Corrections was shot dead after answering the doorbell at his home Tuesday night. So far no one has been arrested  in the death of Tom Clements.

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Surveillance
12:07 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Big Brother Is Watching, But Do You Really Care?

What are your thoughts about having cameras in public spaces?
Eugene Gorny

Yesterday the Seattle City Council unanimously passed legislation to require city departments to obtain council approval before acquiring and installing certain surveillance equipment. How do you feel about cameras in public spaces? Ross Reynolds talks with listeners about the pros and cons of having big brother watch us.

Love & Hurt
10:00 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Weekday's Annual Valentine's Day Special

The heart is a fragile thing.
Credit Flickr Photo/Sean McGrath



Yes, it's Valentine’s Day. Does that make you flush with romance? Cold with regret? Or is it just like any other day, but with slightly more chocolate? Sometimes it takes another person to bring out a piece of ourselves we didn't realize we had before. Tell us about the new you brought about by someone else. Or, tell us the exact moment you knew a relationship was over and done. Share your stories with us at 206.543.5869 or weekday@kuow.org.

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Gardening Tips
10:00 am
Mon February 11, 2013

The Gardening Panel Returns!

A determined daffodil blooming in the winter.
Credit Flickr photo/Jim Capaldi

Daffodils are pushing through the soil, though temperatures are still soggy and cold.  Time to start getting those winter gardens ready for spring.  Our gardening panel returns (on a new day – Monday!) to answer your questions. Call us at 206.543.5869 or toll free 800.289.5869. You can also email weekday@kuow.org.

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Sports
10:00 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Is Football Safe For Kids?

How harmful is playing football to athletes?
Credit Flickr photo/Nathan Rupert

The greatest sports spectacle on Earth takes place this Sunday: the Super Bowl. As millions around the world take in the commercials, the halftime show — and, of course, the actual game — football is facing a crisis. Thirty-three deceased former NFL players have been found to have suffered from a degenerative brain disorder called CTE, brought on by years of head trauma and concussions. Even President Obama has expressed concern, telling The New Republic that if he had a son, “I'd have to think long and hard before I let him play football.” It football safe for kids? We’ll take an in-depth look at the issue with youth football coach Chris Gradwohl and Dr. Kim Harmon of the University of Washington.

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Privacy
10:00 am
Thu November 1, 2012

US Supreme Court Considers Electronic Eavesdropping

US Supreme Court.
Credit AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

The Supreme Court hears arguments this week on Clapper v. Amnesty International, a case that will decide whether or not the federal government can be sued for wiretapping U.S. citizens. The Atlantic's Garrett Epps is following the hearing and shares his findings with us.

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