privacy

The Washington governor's office unveiled draft rules for government use of drones Monday. It would replace legislation that Democrat Jay Inslee vetoed earlier this year.

Ross Reynolds talks to Christopher Soghoian, privacy expert for the ACLU, about a 2007 case where the FBI created a fake news link and sent it to a student they suspected was calling in bomb threats to Timberline High School. The link planted malware on the suspect's computer that the FBI was able to use to track and convict the teen.    

Correction: An earlier version of this story misstated which news outlet the FBI used to bait the student suspected of making bomb threats. It was The Associated Press, not The Seattle Times as the guest noted in the radio interview.

Flickr Photo/Adam Fagen (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with UCLA law professor Adam Winkler, author of, "Gunfight: The Battle Over the Right To Bear Arms in America," about privacy concerns with background check bills. Also, we hear from Alan Gottlieb with Protect Our Gun Rights.

Marcie Sillman talks with Tacoma News Tribune reporter Kate Martin about a surveillance device being used by the Tacoma Police Department that sweeps up meta data from cell phones.

Editor's Note: A very serious bug with a scary name, Heartbleed, was discovered and disclosed this week. The bug affects OpenSSL, a popular cryptographic library that is used to secure a huge chunk of the Internet's traffic. Even if you have never heard of OpenSSL, chances are, it's helped secure your data in some way.

Flickr Photo/AdamFagen (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Hanni Fakhoury, attorney for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, about the recent Washington Supreme Court ruling on privacy rights. The Court found that text messages are considered private, and police need a warrant before they read them.

Seattle police patrol cars.
Flickr Photo/Brittney Bollay (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Seattle City Councilmember Bruce Harrell about a proposal that would allow the Seattle Police Department to use facial recognition software to identify suspects from security footage.

Life After Blowing The Whistle On The NSA

Feb 6, 2014
Flickr Photo/Project On Government Oversight

Steve Scher talks with former NSA senior executive Thomas Drake about his experience before, during and after blowing the whistle on fraud and abuse in the United States government.

Marcie Sillman talks with Randy Barnett, Georgetown University constitutional law expert, about what promises to be a long legal battle over NSA surveillance.

Flickr Photo/CPOA

Ross Reynolds talks with University of Washington law professor Anita Ramasastry about the concerns behind using biometric technology in schools, like using fingerprints to identify students.

UW Students Learn To Hack For Your Safety

Nov 14, 2013
Flickr Photo/Alexandre Dulaunoy

What do kids who play capture the flag on summer breaks do when they grow up and go to college? Turns out, the same thing – only the game evolves to computer security and privacy puzzles in a trend that’s being called “ethical hacking.”

Flickr Photo/Chris Hardie

Steve Scher talks with Washington Representative Susan DelBene about USA Freedom Act which could limit the NSA's ability to collect data in the US.

Flickr Photo/James Joel

The continuing drip of revelations about NSA spying continues to provoke outrage around the world.  Harvard historian and New Yorker staff writer Jill Lepore puts that outrage in historical context. She tells The Record's David Hyde that the modern concept of a right to privacy is a relatively new concept. And Lepore says the assertion of privacy rights always follows the rise of new technologies that have already invaded our privacy.

Michael Clinard

We’ve all seen them: cute baby pictures in our Facebook, Instagram or Twitter feeds. For many parents, it’s hard to resist the temptation to share just how adorable their kid looks in their first rain boots or winter hat. But some are saying parents should pause before hitting that "share" button. Marcie Sillman talks with Amy Webb about why she doesn’t post anything about her daughter online.

Flickr Photo/Jeni Rodger

Facebook and Yahoo have joined Microsoft and Google in asking the Federal Intelligence Surveillance Court for permission to tell the public about personal information they give to spy agencies.

The big four companies are responding to persistent reports that spy agencies are using them to grab users’ personal information.

In the FISA court filings, Microsoft, Facebook, Yahoo and Google say their reputations have been damaged. They say only a small part of Internet traffic is being handed to spy agencies, and they want to give the public information to correct the record.

The Justice Department says it can’t allow that for national security reasons.

The companies say that gag order violates their free-speech rights. Microsoft and Google are asking the FISA court to allow oral arguments so that they can argue their case in public.

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