privacy

Security Issues
1:19 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

The Security Bug That Affects Most Of The Internet, Explained

A screen grab from a Heartbleed test Tuesday morning showed Yahoo was vulnerable. The company has since fixed the vulnerability.
filippo.io/Heartbleed screengrab

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 2:45 pm

Editor's Note: A very serious bug with a scary name, Heartbleed, was discovered and disclosed this week. The bug affects OpenSSL, a popular cryptographic library that is used to secure a huge chunk of the Internet's traffic. Even if you have never heard of OpenSSL, chances are, it's helped secure your data in some way.

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Washington Supreme Court
2:51 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Text Messages Get The Same Privacy Rights As Traditional Mail

Flickr Photo/AdamFagen (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Hanni Fakhoury, attorney for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, about the recent Washington Supreme Court ruling on privacy rights. The Court found that text messages are considered private, and police need a warrant before they read them.

Law Enforcement Technology
2:52 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

Seattle Police Push For Facial Recognition Software

Flickr Photo/Brittney Bollay (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Seattle City Councilmember Bruce Harrell about a proposal that would allow the Seattle Police Department to use facial recognition software to identify suspects from security footage.

National Security
3:17 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

Life After Blowing The Whistle On The NSA

Former senior executive Thomas Drake blew the whistle on NSA.
Flickr Photo/Project On Government Oversight

Steve Scher talks with former NSA senior executive Thomas Drake about his experience before, during and after blowing the whistle on fraud and abuse in the United States government.

NSA Surveillance
3:12 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

Judge Rules NSA Phone Record Collection 'Likely' Unconstitutional, Now What?

Marcie Sillman talks with Randy Barnett, Georgetown University constitutional law expert, about what promises to be a long legal battle over NSA surveillance.

Technology
3:28 pm
Wed December 11, 2013

Paying For Lunch With Your Palm: Biometric Technology In Schools

Flickr Photo/CPOA

Ross Reynolds talks with University of Washington law professor Anita Ramasastry about the concerns behind using biometric technology in schools, like using fingerprints to identify students.

Ethical Hacking
4:35 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

UW Students Learn To Hack For Your Safety

Competitors at a computer security competition, also known as a CTF - Capture the Flag.
Flickr Photo/Alexandre Dulaunoy

What do kids who play capture the flag on summer breaks do when they grow up and go to college? Turns out, the same thing – only the game evolves to computer security and privacy puzzles in a trend that’s being called “ethical hacking.”

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USA Freedom Act
2:55 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Congress Considers Restrictions On NSA Domestic Surveillance

Flickr Photo/Chris Hardie

Steve Scher talks with Washington Representative Susan DelBene about USA Freedom Act which could limit the NSA's ability to collect data in the US.

Privacy
3:37 pm
Fri October 25, 2013

Jill Lepore On NSA Spying, New Technology And History Of Privacy

Professor Jill Lepore
Flickr Photo/James Joel

The continuing drip of revelations about NSA spying continues to provoke outrage around the world.  Harvard historian and New Yorker staff writer Jill Lepore puts that outrage in historical context. She tells The Record's David Hyde that the modern concept of a right to privacy is a relatively new concept. And Lepore says the assertion of privacy rights always follows the rise of new technologies that have already invaded our privacy.

Internet Privacy
10:41 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Should Parents Post Baby Pics Online?

Michael Clinard

We’ve all seen them: cute baby pictures in our Facebook, Instagram or Twitter feeds. For many parents, it’s hard to resist the temptation to share just how adorable their kid looks in their first rain boots or winter hat. But some are saying parents should pause before hitting that "share" button. Marcie Sillman talks with Amy Webb about why she doesn’t post anything about her daughter online.

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First Amendment
9:44 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Yahoo And Facebook Join Microsoft And Google In Free Speech Request

Flickr Photo/Jeni Rodger

Facebook and Yahoo have joined Microsoft and Google in asking the Federal Intelligence Surveillance Court for permission to tell the public about personal information they give to spy agencies.

The big four companies are responding to persistent reports that spy agencies are using them to grab users’ personal information.

In the FISA court filings, Microsoft, Facebook, Yahoo and Google say their reputations have been damaged. They say only a small part of Internet traffic is being handed to spy agencies, and they want to give the public information to correct the record.

The Justice Department says it can’t allow that for national security reasons.

The companies say that gag order violates their free-speech rights. Microsoft and Google are asking the FISA court to allow oral arguments so that they can argue their case in public.

9:57 am
Fri September 6, 2013

This Is Your Data Profile

Lead in text: 
Somewhere, out there, is a profile of you. A file containing information about who you hang out with, what music you listen to and what you like to buy. APM's Stacey Vanek Smith went diving to find out what marketing companies knew about her. The two words that bothered her the most: "markedly single."
Reporter Stacey Vanek Smith delves into the world of data mining and comes face to face with her data profile.
Data Mining
1:47 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Oregon Sen. Wyden On The NSA, "The Law Always Ought To Be Public"

AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

"When the American people find out how their government has secretly interpreted the Patriot Act, they are going to be stunned, and they are going to be angry," said Oregon Senator Ron Wyden on the Senate floor in May, 2011. He was referencing the National Security Agency’s secret surveillance program.

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Privacy
1:41 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Biographies In The Age Of Email

Credit Flickr Photo/pennstatenews

For centuries, biographers relied on handwritten letters to bring historical figures to life, from Ghandi to Catherine The Great. But email, texts and Outlook have changed how historians work. For example, we know from emails how Microsoft executives reacted to Apple’s early success with iTunes: “We were smoked.”

Full list of stories from KUOW Presents, August 7:

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National Intelligence Leaks
5:45 am
Thu August 1, 2013

U.S. 'Extremely Disappointed' At Russia's Asylum For Snowden

NSA leaker Edward Snowden has been granted temporary asylum in Russia. He left Moscow's airport Thursday for the first time in more than a month.
Tatyana Lokshina AP

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 12:21 pm

This post was last updated at 2 p.m. ET

The White House says it is "extremely disappointed" in Russia's decision to grant a temporary one-year asylum to NSA leaker Edward Snowden.

Snowden left Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport on Thursday after spending more than a month holed up in its transit center. Anatoly Kucherena, a Russian lawyer who has been advising the former U.S. intelligence contractor, told Russian media that Snowden's whereabouts are being kept secret for security reasons.

The Obama administration's displeasure was clear:

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