poverty

Lovincer from Uganda works managing her fresh banana business to support her family.
Facebook Photo/Kiva

Jessica Jackley was a liberal arts major who stumbled her way into the Stanford MBA program.

Philosophy and business came together for her in 2005 when she helped start Kiva, the world’s first person- to-person microlending website. Kiva facilitates lending to poor and underserved entrepreneurs and students in 83 countries.

KUOW Photo/Paul Kiefer

RadioActive’s Julia Furukawa and Paul Kiefer delve into the often overlooked reality of hunger in contemporary America. Through a brief history lesson, a talk with University of Washington School of Public Health professor Donna Johnson and a small experiment, these journalists build a basic understanding of the origins and issues of modern food insecurity. 

RadioActive is KUOW's program for youth age 16-20ish. Listen to RadioActive stories, subscribe to the RadioActive podcast and stay in touch on Facebook and Twitter.

In 2000 the world's leaders agreed on an ambitious plan to drastically reduce global poverty by 2015. Called the Millennium Development Goals, the targets spurred an unprecedented aid effort that brought lifesaving medicines and vaccines to millions of people and helped slash the share of people in the developing world who live in extreme poverty from 47 percent in 1990 to 14 percent today.

In April this year, on Earth Day, Pope Francis urged everyone to see the world through the eyes of God, as a garden to cultivate.

"May the way people treat the Earth not be guided by greed, manipulation, and exploitation, but rather may it preserve the divine harmony between creatures and creation, also in the service of future generations," he said.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Charlie Bresler, the former president of the clothing chain Men’s Wearhouse who became executive director of Bainbridge Island-based charity The Life You Can Save. The nonprofit was founded by ethicist Peter Singer to encourage effective philanthropy to end poverty in developing nations. 

File photo of homeless person in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/~C4Chaos (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Alice Shobe about rapid re-housing and how the strategy fits into ending homelessness in Seattle and King County. Shobe is executive director of the Seattle nonprofit Building Changes.

A homeless camp beneath an Interstate 5 off-ramp in Seattle's SODO district.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Bill Radke talks with Seattle City Councilmember Mike O'Brien about a proposal to expand and regulate homeless encampments in Seattle.

Jeannie Yandel talks with Marty Hartman about the challenges faced by homeless students in Washington state. Hartman is executive director of Mary's Place, a Seattle nonprofit that provides shelter and resources for homeless women and children.

Ross Reynolds talks with Stephen Norman, executive director of King County Housing Authority, about the affordable housing crisis in King County.

Jairo Gomez is 17 years old and lives in a tiny apartment in New York City with eight other family members. He has grown up in poverty, like one-third of all kids in the city. With WNYC's program Radio Rookies, Gomez tells the story of how poverty has held him back, and how he's trying to overcome it.

There are nine of us in my family, and we live in a one-bedroom apartment. I share a bunk bed with my sister Judy.

What if, the next time you went to the doctor, instead of a prescription for blood thinners you got one for cash? What if you walked out the door with $1,000 in your pocket instead of paying a copay?

Marcie Sillman talks to New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof, author of the new book "A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity," about the power of giving back.

Jeannie Yandel talks with James Morone, an urban studies and political science professor at Brown University, about the growing pains of young cities. 

We also hear from Pat Gray of Kent Hope and Kent resident Gregg Haffner about the plans for a 24-hour homeless shelter in the city. 

KUOW/John Ryan photo

A homeless camp has popped up on a busy sidewalk in Seattle’s University District. Members of the small tent community say 20 people live here.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Just off Aurora Avenue in North Seattle is a rather gray looking apartment building owned by Seattle Housing Authority.

Single mother Rebecca Snow Landa lives there with her two kids. She shows me around. "So this is our piano that we’re very proud of, and I’m teaching my kids to play."

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