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politics

Paul Guppy, Bill Radke, Erica Barnett and John Roderick.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Why would lottery riches ruin other people's lives, but not yours? Is President Barack Obama right that we’re too partisan?

Farewell, tipping. Farewell, David Bowie. Hello, The Long Winters' John Roderick,  journalist Erica “Crank” Barnett, Washington Policy Center's Paul Guppy and host Bill Radke on Week In Review.

Donald Trump did not dominate the sixth debate among the most prominent Republican candidates for president, but he may have been its prime beneficiary.

Trump held his own through an evening of challenges from the FOX Business Network moderators and from six rivals with him on stage. There were plenty of slings and arrows all around, yet Trump did nothing to discourage his fans while watching his main rivals carve each other up. He even had a moment of thoughtful connection while defending his "New York values."

Thursday's main Republican debate airs on Fox Business Network beginning at 9 p.m. EST.

It was perhaps fitting that the most memorable passage of President Obama's final State of the Union speech should come near its end.

After nearly an hour on the podium, Obama paused and slipped into a mode more suited to a pulpit. In the next few minutes, the president tried to address the state not of the American union but of American politics.

Olympia on a winter's night.
Flickr Photo/John (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/5JRAya

State lawmakers are gathering in Olympia Monday to kick off the 2016 session. No doubt, lobbyists will be roaming the halls of the state capitol this winter. But it's not just big business and special interest pushing their agendas.

The city of Seattle is lobbying, too.

The King County Council unanimously appointed replacements Thursday for departing Washington state Senator Jeanne Kohll-Wells. Kohll-Wells will leave the Senate since she was elected to the County Council in November.

Rep. Jim McDermott has represented the Seattle area for 14 terms.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Jim McDermott has represented Seattle in the U.S. Congress since 1989. He was elected to that office 14 times. But now, he wants to retire, to travel, to teach and to paint.

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

Here's what we've heard about evangelical voters lately: Donald Trump, Ben Carson, and now Ted Cruz are fighting for them. Cruz says that a bunch of them are "missing" (and that he's the man to find them). And anyone will tell you that they play a decisive role in Iowa GOP caucuses.

It seems everybody loves Beyoncé. But not everyone can say her name.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton was asked about the performer Wednesday by an audience member at a town hall in Iowa: "If you could choose, would you rather be the president or Beyoncé?"

The Democratic National Committee and the presidential campaign of Bernie Sanders have reached an agreement to restore the campaign's access to the DNC's massive voter file.

The decision, announced just after midnight Saturday, capped off a chaotic day in which the DNC blocked the Sanders campaign from accessing the national database, which plays a critical role in campaigns' strategies and daily operations.

Unless you've spent the past year or so in an ice cave on Hoth — or have the misfortune of living on a planet farthest from the bright center of the universe — you're probably aware there's a new Star Wars movie, The Force Awakens, coming out on Friday.

Editor's Note: Some readers might find some of the language below offensive.

This post was updated at 11:30 a.m. ET

Donald Trump has made his most outrageous statement yet in a string of beyond-the-pale utterances.

President Obama's request that American Muslims help "root out" and confront extremist ideology in their communities is getting mixed reactions. Muslim leaders say they want to help, but some are not happy that they are being singled out.

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