politics

A statue of Russian revolutionary leader Vladimir Lenin in Seattle's Fremont neighborhood.
Flickr Photo/Martin Deutsch CC By-NC-ND-2.0 http://bit.ly/1MIuGBF

Washington state and Seattle have a reputation as left-leaning – most recently because of the election of Socialist city council member Kshama Sawant and our adoption of the $15 an hour minimum wage.

But our lefty reputation is older than that. (Exhibit A: statue of Russian revolutionary Vladimir Lenin in Fremont.)

Before we can even be seated in the Midtown cafe where we meet, Lily Eskelsen Garcia has begun her barrage of plainspoken, provocative opinions. A Democratic superdelegate, she's just come from a spot on a morning news show, where, she declared, "Hillary is winning no matter how you look at it."

Leroy Robinson Jr. owns a barbershop in West Philadelphia. He's been doing this work for 40 years — and he says the trade runs in the family.

"My father's a barber, my brother is a barber and here I am," he says.

His favorite part of the job is talking to his customers about, well, nearly everything.

"Right now, the political thing is on the horizon," Robinson says, "But the biggest thing right now is Villanova."

When the dams were constructed along the Columbia River in the 1930s, tribal villages were permanently flooded.

Northwest senators are now taking the first steps to replace them.

Oregon Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley and Washington Sen. Patty Murray have placed a clause into a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers bill that would pay for planning a new tribal village at The Dalles Dam.

Three years ago, the corps recognized it hadn’t followed through on promises to replace inundated villages.

King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg wants to make his office nonpartisan. The Republican said he will ask the county council to send a charter amendment to voters this fall.

Police needed most of Monday afternoon to arrest all of the sit-down protesters outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington at a demonstration in favor of changing the rules on political money, voting rights and redistricting.

Kerry French at American Lake in Lakewood. She's campaigning for Sen. Ted Cruz in Pierce County.
KUOW PHOTO/Amy Radil

Kerry French, a Republican leader in Pierce County, campaigns for Ted Cruz, the presidential candidate, with a smart phone app.

Users earn “points” as they give information and get the word out. First comes a brief survey, which French demonstrated at a park in Lakewood, near her desk job at Camp Murray. 

“Would you describe yourself as evangelical? Yes. If I had to choose I’d probably say Tea Party-ish. Although Tea Party values are in our platform. So, Libertarian? Maybe a little.”

John Nichols and Robert McChesney at UC Berkeley.
Flickr Photo/Steve Rhodes (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/gVotXN

In their new book “People Get Ready: The Fight Against a Jobless Economy and a Citizenless Democracy,” Robert McChesney and John Nichols argue for a return to democratic ideals -- or else. Their dire warnings point to the possibility of a massive failure for our economy and political system without the renewal of core democratic infrastructures: “a credible free press, high quality education for all and checks on inequality, militarism and corruption.”

Ross Reynolds interviews Mara Liasson at a KUOW event on March 31, 2016.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Ross Reynolds interviews Mara Liasson, NPR’s national political correspondent. She’s covered presidential elections since 1992 and was  NPR's White House correspondent for all eight years of the Bill Clinton administration. In this conversation on March 31, she talks about the dilemma Donald Trump poses the Republican Party and the prospects of a showdown between Trump and Hillary Clinton for president.

Vice President Joe Biden toured the lab at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center before holding a roundtable meeting with scientists there. Biden says he's encouraged to see more cooperation between researchers and doctors.
Fred Hutch News Service Photo/Robert Hood

Vice President Joe Biden urged scientists to collaborate to help speed up the process to cure cancer. Biden was in Seattle Monday. He toured a lab at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, then held a roundtable discussion with scientists.

Just after President Obama and I concluded our interview — and after the microphones and cameras clicked off — he added a thought.

Senate Republicans' vow not to consider the nomination of Judge Merrick Garland to the U.S. Supreme Court, he said, could have profound consequences for the high court and the justices themselves.

DeRay Mckesson, 30, is a leading Black Lives Matter activist who is now running to become mayor of Baltimore, his hometown, almost a year after the death of Freddie Gray in police custody caused rioting in the city. Mckesson tells Here & Now’s Robin Young what inspired him toward activism and now politics.

[Youtube]

Former first lady Nancy Reagan died Sunday at the age of 94. The elegant, famously adoring wife off Ronald Reagan is being remembered by political figures and everyday Americans for her character, her advocacy work and her unflagging support for her husband — as well as, in some cases, for more controversial elements of her legacy.

Here's a sample from the tributes released in the world of politics:

Former president George W. Bush:

In their seventh debate, this time in Flint, Mich., Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders agreed on the root causes of that city's drinking water crisis. They both called for a massive federal intervention and investigation of the lead poisoning there and urged that the state's Republican governor, Rick Snyder, either resign or be recalled.

But the two Democratic candidates also clashed over the role of trade deals in the deterioration of Michigan's economy, the usefulness of the Export-Import Bank and the state of manufacturing in America generally.

The GOP may be in the midst of an identity crisis, but the Democratic Party is also facing a political crisis that could be made a lot worse if it doesn't win the White House in November.

Here's why:

Part of President Obama's legacy is the health of his party. He's had many successes in office — health care reform, climate change regulations, Wall Street reform — but his legacy will also include one huge failure: a diminished Democratic Party.

Pages