politics

Washington state's delegates are split on Donald Trump's candidacy -- and his rhetoric.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

This year the Republican presidential nominee has divided the country – and his own party – as much as any nominee in over 40 years.

And much of that has do with his choice of words. 


Susan Hutchison, chair of the Washington state Republican Party, at the GOP convention in Cleveland on July 18.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Sen. Ted Cruz spoke at the Republican convention Wednesday night — and got booed.

It wasn't something he said. It was what he didn’t say: He refused to endorse Donald Trump.

And that didn’t sit well with Washington state GOP chair Susan Hutchison.

Lots of members of Washington state's delegation to the GOP convention still back Ted Cruz. They wore these T-shirts Wednesday morning at their hotel in Cleveland.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

In the end, the rebellion was crushed. Donald Trump was nominated as the GOP’s presidential candidate.

All of Washington state’s delegate votes were cast for him Tuesday night at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

“Forty-four votes for Donald J. Trump!” state GOP chair Susan Hutchison said in delivering the delegation on the convention floor.


Washington state delegate Braedon Wilkerson says Donald Trump fails the constitutional test.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Call it the five stages of grief for delegates who oppose Donald Trump at the Republican National Convention.

KUOW’s David Hyde is in Cleveland, and he told host Emily Fox that many in Washington state’s delegation are feeling that.

Washington state's delegates are split on Donald Trump's candidacy -- and his rhetoric.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

The countdown to Donald Trump’s acceptance of the Republican nomination has begun in Cleveland. But some members of Washington state’s delegation to the GOP convention still aren’t at peace with that.

“Well, I’m coming with a heavy heart because Donald Trump is our nominee, and the reason I have a heavy heart is he’s not even a Republican,” said Maria Apodaca, one of the alternate delegates. “He’s hijacking the Republican Party.”

The FBI interviewed Hillary Clinton for the probe into her use of a private email server while she was Secretary of State on Saturday morning, according to a spokesman for Clinton.

Spokesman Nick Merrill said in a statement that the interview about her email arrangements was "voluntary" and adds, "She is pleased to have had the opportunity to assist the Department of Justice in bringing this review to a conclusion."

He says Clinton will not comment further about the interview "out of respect for the investigative process."

President Obama spoke with NPR's Steve Inskeep.

Steve Inskeep: You've been told, I think, that we are doing a documentary. We went across a good part of the country to places where you have given speeches over the years to just talk with people about how their lives have changed.

Danni Askini, the executive director of the Gender Justice League.
Courtesy of Danielle Askini

Trans rights activist Danni Askini was at our station recently, flawless as always, despite being on a press interview marathon.  

Then our host Bill Radke asked her, "Do you ever get sick of getting interviewed about differences, and minority status? I haven't ever talked to you about anything else once the microphones roll."

A marijuana collective on Aurora Avenue North, where there are several medical marijuana dispensaries within a few blocks. The deadline for medical marijuana storefronts to meet state regulations is July 1.
Google Maps

Along certain stretches of highway in Washington state are green crosses painted on a white background.

These crosses signal a medical marijuana dispensary nearby.

The latest superPAC attack ad against Donald Trump checks all of the boxes when it comes to campaign tropes. There's stock footage, an ominous soundtrack, "real" Americans.

Yesterday on Capitol Hill, Tina Meins and other survivors of gun violence joined Democratic senators to push for tougher gun control laws. In the San Bernardino mass killing last year, Meins' father and 13 of his co-workers were shot to death.

"In mere seconds, my life and the lives of my mother and sister were irrevocably changed," she says.

Hillary Clinton spoke with NPR's Steve Inskeep, host of Morning Edition, on Monday, June 13, 2016 — one day after a deadly shooting in Orlando.


STEVE INSKEEP: When you think about the fact that this is a U.S. citizen, how are you thinking about the nature of the threat?

Donald Trump marched through the Republican presidential primary field this year on the strength of a focused message: America used to be great. It isn't anymore. And that's mostly the fault of the Obama administration.

On Thursday, Trump applied that same thesis to American energy production. "America's incredible energy potential remains untapped," he told a North Dakota audience in what was billed as a major policy address. "It's totally self-inflicted. It's a wound, and it's a wound we have to heal."

Jonathan Tong talks to Nicole Barthel about signing a petition to put Initiative 1464 on the November ballot. She signed.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

If you want to get an initiative on the ballot in Washington state you need a lot of signatures: nearly a quarter million valid ones from registered voters.

And typically, that's going to cost you around a million bucks. If you want to do it cheaper you need people like Jonathan Tong.

Amy Radil

The campaign to replace retiring Congressman Jim McDermott is getting off the ground in Seattle. Most of the candidates for the seat held their first debate Wednesday at the University of Washington.


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