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politics

President-elect Donald Trump has said he will end so-called “sanctuary cities” for unauthorized immigrants. That label refers to hundreds of places across the country, including Seattle, Los Angeles and Austin, Texas. 

Hannah Atlas hugs her mom, Judith Gille, as the crowd sings the late Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah" during a vigil Sunday at Seattle's Cal Anderson Park.
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

People letting out raw emotion and looking for community. A new generation of Americans getting a crash course in politics.

Hundreds gathered Sunday evening at Seattle's Cal Anderson Park on Capitol Hill to voice support for American democracy and opposition to President-elect Donald Trump.

Episode 735: President Trump

Nov 12, 2016

Last month, Donald Trump released his plans for his first 100 days in office. He talked about dismantling NAFTA and repealing the Affordable Care Act. He called for deporting millions of undocumented immigrants and building a wall along the southern border. He promised to slash taxes and ban White House officials from lobbying for five years.

Now that Donald Trump is President-elect, what can he actually do? What's possible and what would it would actually take? We look at the laws on breaking trade agreements and how much concrete he'd need to construct a wall along the border.

Flickr/Washington State House Republicans

If you look at a map of the presidential vote in Washington, you'll see solid Democratic blue in the Puget Sound region. The large population centers in Western Washington carried the state overwhelmingly for Hillary Clinton. But east of the Cascades, every county except for one, voted for Donald Trump. Matt Manweller, Republican state lawmaker from Ellensburg, is also a political science professor at Central Washington University. He spoke with KUOW’s Emily Fox about Trump’s appeal east of the Cascade Mountains.

Smoke stacks during a night scene in Tacoma, Wash.
Flickr Photo/Tom Collins (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Kim Malcolm talks with New York Times Seattle bureau chief Kirk Johnson about the potential impact of a carbon tax on the American coal industry. Initiative 732 would impose a tax on carbon emissions, cut taxes on manufacturing and sales, and reduce Washington's sales tax by one point.

KUOW Photo / John Ryan

In a year that has broken record after high-temperature record, politicians in Washington state are saying a vote for them is a vote for the climate. Two initiatives on the ballot claim to be major advances in fighting climate change. KUOW fact-checks the initiative claims.


Social workers Bradly Smith and Jackie St. Louis check in on Tonja Warner, who is homeless. Smith and St. Louis walk with cops on their beat and connect people they encounter with services.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Mayor Ed Murray about the state of emergency on homelessness and what we've done in the year since it was declared.

To Chinese-American voters: We hear you!

Nov 2, 2016

A KUOW story about Chinese-Americans' views on the presidential race has received a considerable response from the Chinese-American community. The original headline, “A Trump win would help China. That is why this banner flew over Seattle,” was changed to “Why some Chinese-Americans support Trump (it has nothing to do with China)” to more accurately convey the focus of the story.

KUOW Photo/John Ryan

If you go to Puget Sound Energy’s website, you’ll see Washington’s largest utility claim to take a stand on greenhouse gas emissions. The gas and electric utility says says it's investing in wind power and supporting policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

At PSE's Bellevue headquarters on Monday, you’d have seen environmentalists protesting PSE's efforts to block action on climate change.


Flickr Photo/Brian Turner (CC BY 2.0)/ http://bit.ly/1QiDCKB

Kim Malcolm talks with Loyola Law School professor Jessica Levinson about the benefits and drawbacks of electing judges. In Washington, we elect judges at all levels by popular vote in non-partisan races.

Paul Graves, Republican candidate in the 5th Legislative District, speaks with Jackie Treadwell on her porch in Maple Valley.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

It’s not hard to see what Republicans in Western Washington are up against this year. State House candidate Paul Graves runs into it at Jackie Treadwell’s door in Maple Valley.

“Are you a Democrat or a Republican?” asks Treadwell.

No, you don't need a stamp for your ballot

Oct 26, 2016
This ballot's stamp game is on point.
KUOW

Let’s repeat that, in case you skimmed over the headline: 

Your ballot will be counted even if you DO NOT affix a stamp to the envelope. 

Linda Brewster of Port Townsend is in Seattle to make some phone calls for I-735.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Linda Brewster lives in Port Townsend, but today she traveled to Seattle to make phone calls for Initiative 735. She estimates she's dedicated over 1,500 hours of her life to this campaign.

Pramila Jayapal and Brady Walkinshaw agree on the issues for the most part. Walkinshaw notes that his contributions come mostly from within Washington state; Jayapal rebuts that she is running for national office.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Kim Malcolm talks with Publicola's Josh Feit about the 7th Congressional District race between Pramila Jayapal and Brady Walkinshaw. This week, Jayapal's campaign accused Walkinshaw's campaign of putting out a dishonest and misleading TV ad. Feit is political editor at Seattle Met Magazine where we writes the blog, Publicola.

A political action committee largely funded by three wealthy Washingtonians has unleashed a hard-hitting attack on a state Supreme Court justice up for re-election. The TV ad suggests Justice Charlie Wiggins is soft on crime.

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