politics

Danni Askini, the executive director of the Gender Justice League.
Courtesy of Danielle Askini

Trans rights activist Danni Askini was at our station recently, flawless as always, despite being on a press interview marathon.  

Then our host Bill Radke asked her, "Do you ever get sick of getting interviewed about differences, and minority status? I haven't ever talked to you about anything else once the microphones roll."

A marijuana collective on Aurora Avenue North, where there are several medical marijuana dispensaries within a few blocks. The deadline for medical marijuana storefronts to meet state regulations is July 1.
Google Maps

Along certain stretches of highway in Washington state are green crosses painted on a white background.

These crosses signal a medical marijuana dispensary nearby.

The latest superPAC attack ad against Donald Trump checks all of the boxes when it comes to campaign tropes. There's stock footage, an ominous soundtrack, "real" Americans.

Yesterday on Capitol Hill, Tina Meins and other survivors of gun violence joined Democratic senators to push for tougher gun control laws. In the San Bernardino mass killing last year, Meins' father and 13 of his co-workers were shot to death.

"In mere seconds, my life and the lives of my mother and sister were irrevocably changed," she says.

Hillary Clinton spoke with NPR's Steve Inskeep, host of Morning Edition, on Monday, June 13, 2016 — one day after a deadly shooting in Orlando.


STEVE INSKEEP: When you think about the fact that this is a U.S. citizen, how are you thinking about the nature of the threat?

Donald Trump marched through the Republican presidential primary field this year on the strength of a focused message: America used to be great. It isn't anymore. And that's mostly the fault of the Obama administration.

On Thursday, Trump applied that same thesis to American energy production. "America's incredible energy potential remains untapped," he told a North Dakota audience in what was billed as a major policy address. "It's totally self-inflicted. It's a wound, and it's a wound we have to heal."

Katja Delavar rode her American-made Victory motorcycle to Pasco from Vancouver, Wash., for the state Republican convention.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Katja Delavar may not fit your image of a Washington-state Republican.

There’s the purple-and-black motorcycle and her helmet with the long, purple braid of fake hair flying out the back.

Fauzia Karmali  at the International School in Bellevue
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Back in 1996, the Soccer Mom was seen as a key swing vote. Charlie Rose, the TV host, got into it on PBS.

Rose: "This year pollsters and strategists think the working, suburban mother of school-age children is on the fence. How will the Soccer Moms vote and what do they expect from their candidate?"

A sign at the Occupy Philly protest.
Flickr Photo/-Curly- (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/aEmiVj

Author and journalist Chris Hedges is a radical by U.S. standards. He believes our system of government is so compromised by corporate influence that nothing short of revolution and corporate overthrow can fix it. His suggestions include nationalization of banks and utilities.

Facebook and a top Republican Senator have responded to allegations from the tech website Gizmodo that Facebook is suppressing ideologically conservative news or stories from conservative organizations from its "trending topics" column.

Donald Trump is coming to Lynden, Wash.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

Residents of Lynden, Washington, were surprised that presidential candidate Donald Trump was coming to their small town near the Canadian border.

Now Trump’s campaign has offered an explanation -- and it has nothing to do with border security or any other issue Trump plans to talk about.

Debbi LerMond and other Trump supporters wave signs at an intersection in Duvall.  She says so many people flip them off that she calls this "bird-watching."
Courtesy of Larry Backstrom

Debbi LerMond calls it "bird-watching" – a reference to some of the hand signals she gets from drivers who pass by as she waves signs for Donald Trump near her home in Duvall, Washington.

But there's satisfaction -- and relief -- for LerMond and fellow Trump supporters in knowing that their candidate is the apparent Republican nominee, now that his remaining competitors have dropped out.

Found photo of an Indiana family.
Flickr Photo/Brent (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8mjHW2

Jeannie Yandel talks with author Stephanie Coontz about her updated and revised book, "The Way We Never Were: American Families And The Nostalgia Trap." Coontz teaches history and family studies at Evergreen State College in Olympia.

Kerry French at American Lake in Lakewood. She's campaigning for Sen. Ted Cruz in Pierce County.
KUOW PHOTO/Amy Radil

Overnight, Washington Republicans have had to change gears.

Tuesday they were preparing to welcome candidates Ted Cruz and John Kasich at presidential campaign rallies and events in the state. 

Now with those candidates out of the race, they’re deciding whether they want to support Donald Trump, the party's apparent nominee, or anyone at all.

Ted Cruz raised the most money of any Republican presiddential candidate in Washington state.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Candidates who raise the most money tend to win elections.

But not always.

Republican Senator Ted Cruz was scheduled to speak at a rally in Spokane and a fundraiser in Redmond on Wednesday and at a rally in Bothell on Thursday.

But he dropped out of the presidential race Tuesday night after Donald Trump's big win in Indiana.

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