politics

UW student Varisha Khan sees progress in Hillary Clinton's nomination -- even though she herself is a Bernie Sanders supporter.
KUOW PHOTO/David Hyde

Hillary Clinton may not be the first woman to run for president. Victoria Woodhull did that back in 1872, on the Equal Rights Party ticket with Frederick Douglass.

But Hillary Clinton is the first to be nominated by a major political party. And that’s a big deal for a number of women from Washington state in Philadelphia for the Democratic National Convention.

Nick Vaidyanathan of Seattle joined the protest inside the Democratic National Convention on Wednesday night.
KUOW PHOTO/DAVID HYDE

Nick Vaidyanathan of Seattle helped shout down former CIA director Leon Panetta at the Democratic National Convention on Wednesday night – and he's not sorry about it.

Washington delegate Pamela Eakes at the convention in Philadelphia: 'Young girls right now can look up and they're going to see a president who is a mother, a woman.'
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Hillary Clinton made history Tuesday night when she became the first woman nominated for president by a major party.

The moment drew mixed emotions from Washington state delegates. Many were ecstatic. Hillary delegate Pam Eakes danced on the floor and yelled, "This is it."

Boos from Bernie Sanders supporters drowned out U.S. Rep. Marcia Fudge, the convention chair, when she mentioned Hillary Clinton on Monday.
KUOW photo/David Hyde

If you want to have the Hillary Clinton-Bernie Sanders divide explained in two sound bites, you could do worse than Jack Smith and Pamela Eakes.

State Rep. Noel Frame on giving Bernie supporters some space: "Frankly it's a little bit of a grieving process. And I think we need to understand and respect that."
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

It was an all-star cast as the Democratic National Convention kicked off last night in Philadelphia.

Al Franken. Sarah Silverman. Cory Booker. Michelle Obama. Bernie Sanders.

And Washington state’s delegation heard their messages for Sanders’ supporters: Unite, and vote for Hillary Clinton.


Myra Gamburg, a Clinton alternate delegate, was on the Washington delegation's boat cruise in Philadelphia on Sunday. Gamburg, 84, said she's excited about what Clinton's nomination means for women.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

The heat in Philadelphia hits you like a brick wall whenever you leave the comfort of air conditioning — when you exit the airport, when you leave your hotel room, when you step out of a cab. It's thick, it's oppressive and it makes you sweat.

Personally, after the tepid summer we've had in Seattle, I found it delightful. But I get the feeling that I'm in the minority.

Don't count on Charles Adkins, a Sanders delegate from Everett, to get on the Clinton train just yet.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Washington state delegates are split into two camps in Philadelphia this week at the Democratic National Convention.

Nearly three quarters of our state’s delegates are Bernie Sanders supporters. The rest back Hillary Clinton. 

So you’d expect some tension.


Washington state delegates who supported Ted Cruz pose in Cleveland during the Republican National Convention.
KUOW PHOTO/MATT MARTIN

Donald Trump officially accepted the Republican nomination for president Thursday night in Cleveland.

That ended what's been a pretty dramatic national convention. KUOW’s David Hyde told host Emily Fox what it’s been like.


One of the stickers for sale at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.
KUOW PHOTO/DAVID HYDE

The Republican National Convention wrapped up last night with Donald Trump accepting the party's presidential nomination.

KUOW's David Hyde and Matt Martin were in Cleveland all week, covering Washington state's delegation.

Here are some of the voices they heard, produced by Kate Walters and Andy Hurst.


Washington state's delegates are split on Donald Trump's candidacy -- and his rhetoric.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

This year the Republican presidential nominee has divided the country – and his own party – as much as any nominee in over 40 years.

And much of that has do with his choice of words. 


Susan Hutchison, chair of the Washington state Republican Party, at the GOP convention in Cleveland on July 18.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Sen. Ted Cruz spoke at the Republican convention Wednesday night — and got booed.

It wasn't something he said. It was what he didn’t say: He refused to endorse Donald Trump.

And that didn’t sit well with Washington state GOP chair Susan Hutchison.

Lots of members of Washington state's delegation to the GOP convention still back Ted Cruz. They wore these T-shirts Wednesday morning at their hotel in Cleveland.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

In the end, the rebellion was crushed. Donald Trump was nominated as the GOP’s presidential candidate.

All of Washington state’s delegate votes were cast for him Tuesday night at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

“Forty-four votes for Donald J. Trump!” state GOP chair Susan Hutchison said in delivering the delegation on the convention floor.


Washington state delegate Braedon Wilkerson says Donald Trump fails the constitutional test.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Call it the five stages of grief for delegates who oppose Donald Trump at the Republican National Convention.

KUOW’s David Hyde is in Cleveland, and he told host Emily Fox that many in Washington state’s delegation are feeling that.

Washington state's delegates are split on Donald Trump's candidacy -- and his rhetoric.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

The countdown to Donald Trump’s acceptance of the Republican nomination has begun in Cleveland. But some members of Washington state’s delegation to the GOP convention still aren’t at peace with that.

“Well, I’m coming with a heavy heart because Donald Trump is our nominee, and the reason I have a heavy heart is he’s not even a Republican,” said Maria Apodaca, one of the alternate delegates. “He’s hijacking the Republican Party.”

The FBI interviewed Hillary Clinton for the probe into her use of a private email server while she was Secretary of State on Saturday morning, according to a spokesman for Clinton.

Spokesman Nick Merrill said in a statement that the interview about her email arrangements was "voluntary" and adds, "She is pleased to have had the opportunity to assist the Department of Justice in bringing this review to a conclusion."

He says Clinton will not comment further about the interview "out of respect for the investigative process."

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