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Seattle Police Department patch.
Facebook Photo/Seattle Police Officers Guild

Seattle police come into contact with about 27 people every day who are experiencing a mental health crisis, including mental illness, dementia or drug-related issues.

Sgt. Dan Nelson is in charge of coordinating the Seattle Police Department’s Crisis Intervention Program, which acts as a bridge between the criminal justice system and social services.

Screenshot from Frontline's new documentary 'Chasing Heroin.'
YouTube

Bill Radke talks with filmmaker Marcela Gaviria about her Frontline documentary "Chasing Heroin," which focuses on the Puget Sound region. King County alone saw a spike of 58 percent in fatal heroin overdoses from 2013 to 2014. Seattle's LEAD (Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion) program aims to get addicts into drug treatment instead of jail.

Recruits from around the region, including Seattle Police Department, on the first day at the police academy.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Kim Malcolm talks with King County Sheriff John Urquhart about a proposed law that would allow any legal Washington resident – not just American citizens – to become a police officer.

Oregon lawmakers are advancing a measure that would allow law enforcement officers involved in fatal shootings to ask a court to shield their name for 90 days.

Police Leaders Call To Curb Deadly Force

Feb 17, 2016

A consortium of police officers and researchers is promoting a plan to prevent so-called “lawful but awful” fatal shootings involving law enforcement. The Police Executive Research Forum (PERF) has 30 recommendations for curtailing excessive force in the line of duty, from not shooting at vehicles to abandoning the “21-foot rule.”

The recommendations are contentious in many police departments. Denver Police Chief Robert White, a PERF board member, talks with Here & Now’s Robin Young about the recommendations and shifting police tactics.

Updated at 4:24 p.m. on Feb. 17: Pedro Figueroa was released on bail from an ICE detention center on Feb. 3. Also, the San Francisco Police Department initially denied that it had cooperated with federal immigration agents. But an internal ICE document shows that the police and sheriff were in direct communication with ICE about Figueroa.

'Week in Review' panel Ijeoma Oluo, Joni Balter, Bill Radke and Paul Guppy.
KUOW Photo/Bill Radke

The Week in Review panel covered many issues on this week’s show: what this presidential race says about us, Whitman College’s mascot debate and 405 tolls.

But one segment got particularly heated when KUOW’s Bill Radke, Seattle Channel’s Joni Balter, Washington Policy Center economist Paul Guppy and writer Ijeoma Oluo discussed whether Washington state should make it easier to charge a police officer in the use of deadly force.

During the nearly five weeks of the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon, the FBI kept a low profile, and it attracted some criticism for being too easy on the militants. But the feds' low-key profile concealed a deliberate strategy, one that evolved during an earlier round of confrontations with anti-government protesters in the 1990s.

The Justice Department slapped the city of Ferguson, Mo., with a civil rights lawsuit this week after the City Council voted to change a proposed settlement agreement to reform the police and courts.

When Attorney General Loretta Lynch announced the suit on Wednesday, she said Ferguson police disproportionately targeted black people for traffic stops, use of force and jail sentences.

A jury in New York has convicted NYPD Officer Peter Liang of manslaughter over his shooting of an unarmed black man in a dark stairwell in 2014. Liang, who was a rookie at the time, was also faulted for not aiding his victim.

The verdict was announced Thursday night; soon after, the NYPD announced that Liang has officially been fired from the police force.

Here's how member station WNYC describes the events of Nov. 20, 2014:

A year after Pasco police officers shot and killed Antonio Zambrano-Montes in a busy intersection, community activists and the ACLU of Washington say city efforts aren’t enough.

A federal grand jury is said to have begun hearing evidence in the case of Eric Garner, an unarmed black man who died after he was placed in a chokehold by a white police officer, NPR's Joel Rose reports, citing two sources familiar with the investigation.

The grand jury is determining whether Officer Daniel Pantaleo violated Garner's civil rights as he moved to arrest him for allegedly selling loose cigarettes.

The U.S. Department of Justice is suing the city of Ferguson, Mo., for unjust policing that violates the civil and constitutional rights of citizens, Attorney General Loretta Lynch announced Wednesday.

The lawsuit came one day after the Ferguson City Council voted to change a proposed consent decree to reform the police and courts. The council said the package, which had been negotiated between the DOJ and city officials, cost too much.

For the past two years, Joseph Richardson has been trying to figure out how to keep young black men with knife and gunshot wounds from turning up again with similar injuries at Prince George's Hospital Trauma Center outside Washington, D.C.

Oregon lawmakers want to continue to root out cases of police profiling. A House panel Tuesday advanced a measure that would require additional research into the issue.

Police tape marks the scene of a shooting the left two people dead and three wounded in a homeless camp known as 'The Jungle,' under Interstate 5 in Seattle.
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

Seattle police say they’ve arrested three teenagers in connection with last week's multiple shooting at the homeless camp known as "The Jungle."

Police have arrested three teenagers — ages 13, 16, and 17 — who are believed to have carried out last week's deadly attack on a homeless camp in Seattle known as "The Jungle." Two people were killed in the shooting; three more were hospitalized.

Last week, the authorities said they believed the victims were targeted; today, the AP reports that the police think the crime "stemmed from a drug-dealing dispute."

Queen Anne hill in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/craterdweller (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/5tqcxH

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times reporter Jessica Lee about the growing trend in Magnolia, Queen Anne and Ballard of hiring private police to watch out for crime in the neighborhoods. Radke also gets reaction from Seattle Mayor Ed Murray on the trend of private police.  

Update, 9:15 p.m.

In a press conference, the FBI said Thursday night that four militants still remained at the wildlife refuge, but that the perimeter around them had been reduced.

They also announced that the full video of the arrest of Bundy and several other militants, as well as the shooting death of LaVoy Finicum, had been released.

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a recent verdict which found a Toronto police officer guilty of attempted murder. In 2013, Constable Jame Forcillo shot and killed 18-year-old Sammy Yatim on a streetcar. 

The City of Ferguson, Mo., and the Justice Department have released a draft of the consent decree that they have negotiated.

The 127-page proposed agreement creates guidelines for training police officers on issues like when they should use force and how they can "reorient Ferguson's use-of-force policies toward de-escalation and avoiding force." The agreement also requires body-worn cameras and an overhaul of the municipal court system.

Ammon Bundy, center, one of the sons of Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy, walks off after speaking with reporters during a news conference at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge headquarters Monday, Jan. 4, 2016, near Burns, Ore.
AP Photo/Rick Bowmer

Bill Radke speaks with Oregon Public Broadcasting reporter John Sepulvado about the future of the armed occupation at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge after the FBI arrested Ammon Bundy, the leader of the militant group. 

Police agencies in Washington state would not be allowed to rate officers by how many traffic tickets they hand out under a proposal put forward by a former Spokane police officer.

Marcus Green at Seattle's Mount Zion Baptist Church on Jan. 15, 2016.
Courtesy of Seattle Colleges

An excerpt from a speech by Marcus Green, founder of South Seattle Emerald. Green spoke on Jan. 15 at Mount Zion Baptist Church in Seattle.

For federal wildlife enforcement officers, time on the job means a lot of time alone, wandering remote areas. But one wildlife officer now has a new companion to keep him company on the trail: the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's very first enforcement dog in the Northwest.

The first thing you might notice about the Ukkie is he that speaks Dutch.

“His name is actually Dutch slang for little one. He’s a little bit on the smaller side for a Belgian Malinois,” says officer Josh Hindman.

File Photo: Kathleen O'Toole speaks after being introduced by Seattle Mayor Ed Murray as his nominee to be Seattle's new Chief of Police, May 19, 2014.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O’Toole about why she was invited to sit in  First Lady Michelle Obama's box at President Barack Obama's last State of the Union address.

Last February, three Pasco Police officers shot and killed Antonio Zambrano-Montes in a crowded intersection. Zambrano-Montes had been throwing rocks. This week, the Mexican farmworker’s mother filed suit in federal district court.

Bill Radke talks with Mary Ellen Stone about a forthcoming legislative proposal that would test a large portion of Washington's unprocessed rape kits. Stone is executive director of the King County Sexual Assault Resource Center.

Four percent more law enforcement officers at the federal state, territorial and local levels died in the line of duty in 2015 than in 2014, according to a preliminary report from the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund.

But despite several high-profile shootings of police in 2015, the group also says more officers died in traffic-related events (52) than from gunfire (42).

Chicago police Officer Jason Van Dyke pleaded not guilty Tuesday to first-degree murder and misconduct in the death of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald in October 2014.

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