police

Kim Malcolm talks with Lisa Daugaard about civilian oversight of the Seattle Police Department. Daugaard is co-chair of Seattle's Community Police Commission, and director of the Public Defender Association.

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<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/canadaone/">msppmoore</a> on Flickr/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/deed.en">CC BY-SA 2.0</a>

After the death of Alton Sterling — and Philando Castile, Jamar Clark, Tamir Rice, Michael Brown, Freddie Gray, Trayvon Martin and all the other people of color recently killed by police — many questions will likely go unanswered.

Flickr Photo/scottlum (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/rgPsj9
Flickr Photo/scottlum (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/rgPsj9

Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, Laquan McDonald, Walter Scott. 

"These are all shootings that could've been prevented," said Norm Stamper, former chief of the Seattle Police Department.
 

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson looks at nine police-involved deaths.

Eric Garner

July 17, 2014

Staten Island, New York

Eric Garner was approached by police on the sidewalk for illegally selling loose cigarettes. NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo used a chokehold on Garner. A bystander video shows Garner saying “I can’t breathe” 11 times before he died.

A grand jury declined to indict Officer Pantaleo.

Michael Brown

August 9, 2014

Ferguson, Missouri

President Obama and former President George W. Bush spoke at an interfaith memorial service this afternoon for the five police officers murdered in Dallas last week.

Bush, a resident of Dallas, noted that he interacts with law enforcement every day.

"We're proud of the men we mourn," he said.

It’s been one week since Baton Rouge police officers shot and killed Alton Sterling, a black man selling CDs outside a convenience store. Just a day later, Philando Castile was shot and killed by police outside St. Paul, Minn.

Then last Thursday, a lone gunman killed five Dallas police officers as protestors were winding down what was, by many accounts, a peaceful rally. The following day, the Austin Police Department ushered 37 new police officers onto the force.


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Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

In the wake of the tragic shooting deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, and the tragic shooting deaths of five Dallas police officers at a Thursday night protest against police brutality, it is easy to feel disheartened. It is easy to feel that the problem is too large to ever be solved.

Mayor Ed Murray and Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole address the social consequences of systematic racism at a press conference.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Seattle’s mayor and police chief held a news conference this afternoon to appeal for calm and for dialogue following the shootings of police officers in Dallas and the shootings of African-American men by police. KUOW’s Carolyn Adolph sends this report.

Hundreds gather in St. Paul, Minn., July 7, 2016, for a vigil following the shooting death by police of Philando Castile Wednesday night in Falcon Heights, Minn.
AP Photo/Jim Mone

This has been a week of violence in America. Shootings by police; shootings with police as their targets. What can we do as a community? What will you do as an individual?

Join the discussion in a special call-in edition of Week In Review. We’re opening the phone lines so we can hear from you. Call 206.543.5869 to share your thoughts on air. We’ll be live, beginning at noon PT.

Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo spoke with KUT's Kate McGee this morning, saying that the department will assist the Dallas Police Department in any necessary capacity and that APD will remain on high-staffing levels for the remainder of the summer. At a press availability this afternoon, he reiterated that staffing plan, but also denounced comments from Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick that blamed the Black Lives Matter movement for Thursday night’s shootings.


This is a developing story. Last updated 4:15 p.m. ET

Officials say a gunman shot and killed five police officers Thursday at a Dallas protest against police shootings of black men, in a bout of violence that didn't end until the suspected gunman was killed by police using a "bomb robot."

The suspect, who died in a parking garage, was named Micah Xavier Johnson, federal officials told NPR on Friday. Johnson was a military veteran who had served in Afghanistan, and told negotiators he was upset about police shootings and wanted to kill white police officers.

This is a developing story. Last updated 6:18 a.m. ET.

Snipers shot and killed five Dallas law enforcement officers and injured another six at the end of a rally in downtown Dallas, where hundreds were protesting police shootings that happened in other parts of the country earlier this week.

Four of the officers worked for Dallas Police; the fifth was identified as 43-year-old transit officer Brent Thompson, of Dallas Area Rapid Transit, or DART.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray smiles as he addresses a news conference on a proposal to increase the minimum wage in the city Thursday, April 24, 2014, in Seattle.
(AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray says he’s committed to creating more power and independence for the civilian oversight of the police department. He hopes to advance legislation in the next several weeks, pending approval from a federal judge.


The recent police shootings of African-American men in Louisiana and Minnesota have reignited the debate over use of deadly force. That was on the mind of a black community leader in Washington state as she strapped on a gun belt and took aim inside a state-of-the-art training simulator for police.

At the Washington State Patrol Academy in Shelton, Corporal Lori Hinds guides a pair of visitors into what looks like a walk-in video game. Inside five, large video screens form a 300-degree computer-generated environment.

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