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photography

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Daniel LeClair/Reuters

A few days after Sandy Hook, Attorney General Eric Holder traveled to the site of the mass shooting, spoke with first responders and looked at the pictures.

“I was crying. It was without question the worst day that I had as attorney general, and maybe the worst day in my professional life,” Holder said.

Ericka Frodsham, 36, stands outside a motel on Aurora Avenue North in Seattle. She is homeless, living out of motel rooms.
KUOW Photo/Mike Kane

Earlier this month, when photographer Mike Kane went looking for a Seattle woman to share her story of being a prostitute on Aurora Avenue North, he heard about Ericka Frodsham.

Courtesy of Devin Kelly via @avaderaday

Bill Radke speaks with Devin Kelly, the man behind the @avaderaday Instagram feed, about the lighter side of Darth Vader.

Hawkeye Huey with his FujiFilm camera.
Aaron Huey

When you're 5 years old, you have a different perspective on the world. And that's not just because you're shorter than a lot of the people around you.

Hawkeye Huey (yes, that's his real name) has been taking photographs for the past year or so, and the results garnered a spot on Rolling Stone's list of top 100 Instagram accounts. The Record's David Hyde talked to Hawkeye and his dad, National Geographic photographer Aaron Huey.

People use Instagram to share all kinds of images online — taking selfies and posting photos of brunch, of course, but also discovering raw talent or telling stories that might not otherwise get attention.

That's exactly what many photojournalists use Instagram for: posting photos to draw attention to issues they're passionate about. And visual media giants like Getty Images have taken notice.

A DC-10 flies over Chelan within hours of a wildfire starting on Aug. 14. Sunbathers on holiday watched as the fire effort took hold.
Flickr Photo/Ben Brooks (CC BY-SA 2.0) http://bit.ly/1KSv09n

It was a hot Friday morning when a bolt of lightning stretched out three fingers and hit Chelan Butte.

Then a deafening clap of thunder. Then several rings of fire appeared. They would morph into huge wildfires threatening Chelan, a tourist destination in central Washington state.

Ben Brooks, a digital media manager from Fife, Washington, started taking photos. His images are striking and remarkable because of the sunbathers in the corners of his images. 

Todd Quinn carries one of his surviving goats Saturday after a wildfire swept through his ranch the night before.
The Seattle Times/Sy Bean

Sy Bean is a 23-year-old photojournalist working as an intern for The Seattle Times. Some of his recent photos of the fires in Washington have been featured on the front page. One in particular, of Chelan-area resident Todd Quinn, stood out to him. Sy shared this story of how it came about.

Mary Ellen Mark And The Caged Prostitutes Of Mumbai

May 30, 2015

She saw young women in cages. Men young and old watched as the women beckoned and lifted their skirts, then decided which one to pick as if they were choosing a brand of soap in the supermarket.

That's the sight that confronted Mary Ellen Mark in 1968 when she visited Falkland Street, a bustling thoroughfare in Mumbai. It took ten years of repeat visits before she was able to gain the trust of the prostitutes and begin taking pictures.

Lunchtime for these ... um, lemurs

Jan 27, 2015
Reuters/China Daily

You'll be forgiven for taking a second look at these fuzzy creatures. No, that's not some creepy spider. It's nine playful lemurs chowing down on lunch at the Qingdao Forest Wildlife World in the northeast of China.

Two teenagers in Kivalina, Alaska, play near a skinned polar bear. Scientists predict Kivalina, an Alaskan village, will be the first casualty of climate change and sea rising in the U.S.
Suzanne Tennant

I first heard of Kivalina, a sliver of an island in far northwest Alaska, when I was looking for a photo project.

It appealed in part because of this one startling fact: Scientists believe that Kivalina, population 457, will be the first casualty of climate change in the U.S., and that it will be inundated by sea water by 2025. That’s in just a decade.

SeongJoon Cho/Bloomberg

Welcome to Seeing The News: an occasional collection of noteworthy images from around the globe. We've all experienced an agonizing search for a close space in a crowded parking lot. But, good luck trying to find a space at this Hyundai facility in South Korea.

Courtesy of Beth Moon

Growing up in the United Kingdom, photographer Beth Moon was surrounded by trees.

"I had a special connection with them and I used to play in them as a child," she recalls. So when Moon first picked up a camera in 1999 and started taking photos, trees were a natural subject.

One particular oak — called the Bowthorpe Oak, in England's Lincolnshire — helped kick-start Moon's 14-year photographic project on trees.

The U.S. Department of Interior has a great Twitter account (@interior) that frequently makes lists of best Twitter feeds.

The old saying goes, "a picture is worth a thousand words." That was the reaction of a U.S. Forest Service researcher when he rediscovered a trove of landscape panoramas called the Osborne Panoramas.

China's largest fair devoted to fine art photography opened in Shanghai this weekend. The first-time event is called Photo Shanghai and includes more than 500 works from photographers around the world.

One of the exhibits drawing a lot of Chinese visitors this weekend is by photographer Zhang Kechun. One of the most striking images features a Buddha head, about 40 feet high, sitting in the middle of an open pit coal mine.

Museum of History and Industry/Timothy Eagan

August 21, 1964.

That's the day the Beatles came to Seattle for the very first time.

The Fab Four played 12 songs — 29 minutes total — at the Seattle Center Coliseum. Despite the concert's brevity, by all accounts the 14,000 fans in attendance went wild.

Capturing A Deadly Scene In Gaza City

Jul 17, 2014

As the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians continues, there’s a striking image from the fighting. It’s on the front page of today’s New York Times.

Clark Little photographs ocean waves.

KUOW Photo/Sage Van Wing

Local photographer Jini Dellaccio died last week. She was 97.

Jini was best known for her images of the Pacific Northwest music scene in the 1960s. But Jini came to photography later in life. She was a musician first, a homemaker and a painter. She didn't even pick up a camera until she was in her 40s.

Photographing Literature's Famous Food Scenes

Apr 24, 2014

A confession: I've read Jack Kerouac's On the Road, but I can't tell you much about it. Yes, I know he's on a road trip. But beyond that, I don't recall any of the characters or anything they do or what the point was. What I do remember is that he described some truly great food. In fact, I liked those sections of the book so much that when I read them, I apparently felt the need to scribble them down, word for word, in a notebook.

Courtesy of Robert Rose

Steve Scher talks with Robert Rose, a Bellevue-area portrait photographer, about challenging Nepal's cultural bias against the disabled community. In 2005, he started the Rose International Fund for Children, a non-profit organization that seeks to assist children with disabilities in Nepal .

We told you about the star-stuffed Oscar selfie taken by Ellen DeGeneres that broke Twitter.

It was cool and all, until we learned that it was a publicity stunt by Samsung.

Before World War II, many Americans got exaggerated ideas about Africa from movies like Tarzan the Ape Man — movies that were filmed on Hollywood sound stages.

It took time to change that view. But after the war, Life magazine photographer Eliot Elisofon sought to shed a new light on the vast and variegated continent.

Courtesy of Ann Dornfeld

Puget Sound, a spidery inlet of the Pacific Ocean, has often been derided as murky, toxic and so, so cold.

But Ann Dornfeld, KUOW’s education reporter, has come to love the Sound, where she photographs marine life. Her favorite marine invertebrate is a nudibranch. (Her favorite nudibranch is a Cockerell's dorid.)

Food porn or art? That's for you decide.

But one thing is for certain: The jumbo-sized images in The Photography of Modernist Cuisine are truly awesome.

In one, a ham and cheese sandwich levitates in midair. Then, a Weber grill gets sliced in half lengthwise to expose a pink burger cooking on another page. And blueberries and peas balloon to the size of dinner plates and melons.

Courtesy of Hasted Kraeutler Gallery, NY/Nick Brandt 2013

Correction 10/9/2013: A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that Lake Natron was 402 miles wide. The lake is 402 square miles.

A lake in Tanzania has come into the spotlight recently thanks to a series of eerie photographs released by photographer Nick Brandt. In his book, “Across the Ravaged Land,” Brandt shows the world what happens to some wildlife when it’s submerged Lake Natron, and it’s not pretty.

Women Who Broke The Rules In Nepal

Oct 8, 2013

Photojournalist Arantxa Cedillo has worked all over Southeast Asia, including Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. But in 2011 she decided to spend a few years in Nepal. She says it interested her because it's a country in constant political turmoil, as well as "one of the most beautiful corners of the world."

Lots of us play with our food. But for photographer Christopher Boffoli, it's become a full-time career.

Boffoli rose to fame a couple of years ago. You may have seen some of his photographs — amusing dioramas featuring miniature plastic figurines in dramatic settings crafted from food — when they went viral back in 2011. More than 200 such images — at least half of which, Boffoli says, have not been previously published — are collected in a new book, Big Appetites.

Flickr Photo/Cathy Cole

Micky Dolenz On A Life In Show Biz

George Michael “Micky” Dolenz, Jr., is best known for his role in the television sitcom, “The Monkees.” He became the drummer and a lead vocalist for the band created for the show. But Micky Dolenz spent much of his life in the show biz. Back in 1993, Steve Scher talked with Micky Dolenz about his path to music and the many other projects Micky worked on over the years.

Annie Leibovitz On The Stories Behind Her Photos

Annie Leibovitz began taking photographs for Rolling Stone in 1970. By 1973, she was its chief photographer. In addition to magazine editorial work, Leibovitz has created successful advertising campaigns for American Express, Gap and the Milk Board, among others. Exhibitions of her work have appeared in museums and galleries all over the world. What are the stories behind Annie Leibovitz's iconic photos? Steve Scher talked with Annie Leibovitz in 2008 about what it’s like to photograph queens, presidents and the like.

Taylor Branch On Martin Luther King

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Taylor Branch has written a three-volume history of Martin Luther King Jr. and the civil rights movement, “America In The King Years.” Steve Scher talked with Taylor Branch in 2006 about King’s legacy, democracy and nonviolence.

Mapping King County’s Uninsured
In 2011, more than 200,000 adults living in King County had no health insurance. Now officials are mapping where they live. Why? We talk with King County Public Health director, Dr. David Fleming.
 

Around The Water Cooler
The sunny days are dwindling. Are you making the most of your summer? We hear attendance at Seafair was down this year. Did you go? Musicians Choklate Moore and John Roderick and The Stranger’s David Schmader join us around the Weekday water cooler to talk over these stories and more.


Photographing The Pine Ridge Reservation
National Geographic’s Aaron Huey spent years on South Dakota’s Pine Ridge Reservation photographing the Lakota tribe. His new book is called “Mitakuye Oyasi: All My Relations.”

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