pets

Chewie is one of two posessions Genie took with her when fleeing an abusive husband 9 years ago and becoming homeless for the first time.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Genie is a homeless woman who lives in downtown Seattle with her dog, Chewie. He’s half terrier, half Chihuahua, and he’s named for Chewbacca, the Star Wars character.

Let me say a few things about Lily: She has never tried to herd people, children, cats or dogs. She does not look like a classic herding dog. You wouldn't mistake her for Lassie or the border collie in Babe. And we have no particular reason to think she's been yearning to herd sheep.

Mud Bay workers sign a 'declaration' of worker ownership during a company meeting on Thursday, Aug. 20.
Mud Bay

Ross Reynolds asks the co-CEOs of Mud Bay pet stores why they decided to turn a chunk of the company over to their employees. Last week at the company’s annual Mudstock meeting, employees signed a "declaration" of ownership.

Instead of fighting like cats and dogs, Congress appears to be coming together for a change, and maybe it's because of our feline and canine friends.

In a rare bipartisan vote, the House Wednesday approved an Amtrak funding bill that will keep the trains running for another four years, and allow some pets to ride along on the intercity passenger rail service.

Just about everyone loves puppies. But around the country, there's heated disagreement about where, and from whom, people can get one.

While the large national pet store chains don't sell dogs, other chains and shops do. But in several states, including Florida, cities are passing laws that ban puppy sales in pet stores.

At the Petland store in Plantation, Fla., a suburb of Ft. Lauderdale, customers come in all day long to look at and play with the puppies. At this store, in fact, doggie accessories and puppies are all that owner Vicki Siegel sells.

Dogs have an intuitive understanding of fair play and become resentful if they feel that another dog is getting a better deal, a new study has found.

The study, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, looked at how dogs react when a buddy is rewarded for the same trick in an unequal way.

We often think about people spreading diseases around the world. This spring, vacationers brought chikungunya from the Caribbean to the United States. Businessmen have likely spread Ebola across international borders in West Africa. And health care workers have carried a new virus from the Middle East to Asia and Europe.

But what about (wo)man's best friend?

To Know Thyself, Collect Data On Your Dog

May 12, 2014

If you walk your dog after dinner each night, does that help you sleep better? Maybe you've noticed that this seems to be the case, but access to hard data would help confirm it.

As technology advances and more people dig into the metrics of how they live, the market is exploding with wearable devices that enable deeper self-monitoring. There's even a fancy name for this: the quantifiable self, basically using technology to gather data on your life.

Flickr Photo/Adam Brandejs

How is biotechnology changing our pets, our livestock and other wild things? Ross Reynolds talks with Emily Anthes, the author of "Frankenstein’s Cat: Cuddling up to Biotech’s Brave New Beasts," about how biotech will change our pets and livestock.

This interview originally aired on March 14, 2013.

At Monday's Boston Marathon, many runners will be on the course to honor the 16 people who lost limbs in last year's bombing. One married couple was among them: Jessica Kensky and Patrick Downes.

Among many dark stories of that day, theirs is among the darkest. They were newlyweds of just seven months when each had their left leg blown off. Their injuries were so severe that they were some of the last victims to leave the hospital.

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Long before Cesar Millan became the "Dog Whisperer," with TV shows and a best-selling series of books, he had to learn how to ask for a job in English.

In Sochi this week, athletes are competing in a display of human grace and skill. Many will win. Many more will lose, and many tears will be shed.

In New York on Saturday night, athletes of a different breed competed in a display of canine finesse and dexterity. Many won. If any lost, none knew it. Not one shed a tear.

At the Westminster Dog Show's Masters Agility Championship, 225 exuberant dogs dove through tunnels, flew through hoops, leaped over hurdles and wove in and out of poles with the focus of the highest-level Olympic champion.

Our four-legged friends suffer from many of the same cancers that we do. But one type of dog tumor acts like no other: It's contagious.

The tumor spreads from one pooch to another when the dogs have sex or even just touch or lick each other.

"It's a common disease in street dogs all around the world," says geneticist Elizabeth Murchison at the University of Cambridge. "People in the U.S. and U.K. haven't heard of it because it's found mostly in free-roaming dogs in developing countries."

One Step For Mutts, One Leap For Dogkind

Jan 17, 2014
Flickr Photo/Pet Adviser

Ross Reynolds talks with Westminster Kennel Club spokesperson David Frei about the decision to include mixed-breed dogs in the upcoming Masters Agility Championship on Feb. 8 in New York City.

Flickr Photo/Rocky Mountain Feline

Sure all dogs go to heaven, and cats have nine lives, but that doesn't mean we don't want to keep our pets safe while we have them and now the Food and Drug Administration is getting involved.

This morning the FDA proposed new regulations that will, for the first time, govern production of pet food and farm animal feed. Marcie Sillman talks with Daniel McChesney, director of the Office of Surveillance and Compliance at the FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine about the new regulations and how they will be implemented both domestically and abroad.

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