performing arts | KUOW News and Information

performing arts

Flickr Photo/Stuart Anthony

Charles Dickens’ story “A Christmas Carol” is a holiday favorite. It was performed earlier this month in front of a live audience at Seattle’s Center for Spiritual Living under the title “The Enlightened Message of Scrooge.”

This show will air on KUOW December 23 at 9:00 p.m.

Five Minutes Onstage At Ignite Seattle

Dec 19, 2013
Flickr Photo/Randy Stewart

What would you say if you had five minutes onstage and a captive audience?

That's the premise of Ignite Seattle, a regular worldwide event where presenters get five minutes and twenty PowerPoint slides to get a point across. Speakers at November’s event touched on a variety of topics, including living in two cities, superbugs, and little-known facts about "Hamlet."

Ignite Seattle 22 took place at Town Hall on November 20. The talk was moderated by Seattle Times columnist Monica Guzman.

Courtesy of Pacific Northwest Ballet/Copyright Lindsay Thomas

Canadian choreographer Crystal Pite might actually be better known in Europe than here on the North American continent. The Vancouver Island native trained in ballet and danced with Ballet British Columbia before moving to Europe to perform with legendary American choreographer William Forsythe.

Courtesy of Seattle Reperator Theatre/Nate Watters

It's been a busy year for Elizabeth Heffron. The Seattle playwright's new one-woman show "Bo-Nita" had its world premier at Seattle Repertory Theatre in late October.

Heffron is working on two other scripts she hopes will get full productions. "Portugal" is about a pair of tank farm workers at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The second play, "The Weatherman Project" is a collaboration with Kit Bakke, a former member of the Weather Underground.

Dave Beck On The Legacy Of Toby Saks

Oct 16, 2013
Flickr Photo/Martin A Lester

Last Monday, musicians from around the world gathered at Benaroya Hall to remember cellist, UW music professor and Seattle Chamber Music Society founder Toby Saks. She died from pancreatic cancer this summer. Classical KING FM host (and KUOW alum) Dave Beck attended the memorial. He talks with Marcie Sillman about the memorial and about Saks' legacy.

Flickr Photo/Jared Kelley

Radiolab is a show about, as the creators simply say, curiosity. It looks into questions on science, philosophy and the human experience. This year, they are touring around the country with their live show, "Apocalyptical." Marcie Sillman talks with hosts Robert Krulwich and Jad Abumrad about their roots and translating science to radio.

High School Play Challenges A Family To Forgive

Oct 7, 2013
Courtesy of Trent Selland

Darlene Selland still remembers the day she found out: the knock, being told to sit down. Her niece Tiffany had been murdered. For a long time, she and her family wanted the man responsible to die. Now, thanks to a high school play, they're not so sure.

Pacific Northwest Ballet Photo/Lindsay Thomas

Pacific Northwest Ballet's Studio C is a big rehearsal hall, with the same dimensions as the stage at nearby McCaw Hall where PNB performs. Despite its size, on this afternoon the room feels packed to the gills.

From DASSdance's Facebook page.

Artists are inspired by all sorts of things: a song, an image or a story they want to tell. Choreographer Daniel Wilkins and his company, DASSdance, will premier a new work this weekend, “Tale of Ten Green.”

It springs from the story of the Awa people, an indigenous tribe that lives in Brazil’s Amazon River basin. The Awa haven’t had significant contact with the outside world until recently, and according to Wilkins, the experience has been both violent and exploitative.

“Tale of Ten Green” premiers Friday evening at Seattle’s Washington Hall. 

So You Want To Be A Clown?

Aug 12, 2013

You don’t have to run away to join the circus – this week a camp kicks off in Seattle where kids between the ages of eight and 21 can go and train to learn how to juggle, tumble, walk a tight rope and more. But not everyone can pull off a clown nose. Would-be clown Ben Sherrill recounts the story of how he tried – and failed – to become a clown.

Flickr Photo/Alec Schueler


What Caused Henrietta Lacks’ Aggressive Cancer? Researchers Now Know
The New York Times bestseller “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” tells the story of a young woman who died from aggressive cervical cancer and her amazing immortal cells which have been reproduced since 1951. A new study by the University of Washington has pieced together what caused her cancer, called “a perfect storm of what can go wrong in a cell.” We talk with study author Jay Shendure.

Art Of Our City: Cartoonist Ellen Forney
Ellen Forney is an award-winning cartoonist and illustrator. Her work has been published by Fantagraphics and appears regularly in the pages of The Stranger. Forney has just published a graphic memoir. “Marbles:  Mania, Depression, Michaelangelo and Me” chronicles Forney’s diagnosis with bipolar disorder, and her long journey to finding mental balance.

Sleep Less, Eat More?
Scientists have known for a long time that lack of sleep can lead to weight gain. A new study sheds light on why. The study in Nature Communications finds that lack of sleep causes people to crave unhealthy, high-calorie foods like potato chips and makes it harder for people to control their impulses. We talk with study co-author Matthew Walker of the University of California.

How Wagner Came To America
This month, opera lovers from around the world will flock to McCaw Hall to take in Seattle Opera’s internationally acclaimed production of Richard Wagner’s “Ring of the Nibelungen.” But where did a music lover go in the 1890s to take in some world-class Wagner? Would you believe Coney Island? Cultural historian and Wagner expert Joseph Horowitz tells KUOW’s Dave Beck the story of Laura Langford, the Brooklyn newspaper editor, suffragist, clairvoyant and Wagner disciple who founded a series of outdoor Wagner concerts at the famed Coney Island amusement park.

The Pizzarelli Patriarch Still Swings At 87

Aug 5, 2013
Flickr Photo/Eduardo Loureiro

Bucky Pizzarelli is the patriarch of one of America’s great jazz families.  His talented offspring include guitarist and singer John Pizzarelli and bassist Martin Pizzarelli.  The Pizzarellis often perform standards from the Great American Songbook together at jazz clubs and music festivals around the world. 

Prior to a weekend of performances with the family band at Jazz Alley in Seattle last weekend, Bucky Pizzarelli brought in his signature seven-string guitar and played live music in the KUOW Performance Studio.

KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

If a Hollywood filmmaker decided to make a movie version of composer Richard Wagner's epic "Ring Cycle," he would probably have the latest computer wizardry at his fingertips. But the "Ring" is performed live onstage, featuring more than 15 hours of music spread out over four nights of opera.

Bettina Hansen/The Seattle Times

If Seattle’s dance community had a mayor, it might be Tonya Lockyer. As executive artistic director of Velocity Dance Center, Lockyer oversees a busy hub of classes, performances, lectures, and even potluck dinners. Professional dancers mingle with aspiring amateurs and visiting artists check in at Velocity to learn more about the city’s dance scene. Velocity is busy seven days a week, and you’ll often find Lockyer at her desk, taking in the activity and plotting to create more.

William Sitwell's book"A History of Food in 100 Recipes."

 This Week In Olympia
Lawmakers have until July 1 to reach a budget agreement or the government will shut down. Everett Herald reporter Jerry Cornfield joins us with a look at what’s happening in Olympia this week in special legislative session number two.

The History Of Food
We eat every single day, but  we rarely pause to consider why we eat the food we do. How did food evolve throughout history? Where did pasta come from for instance? Who baked the first cupcake? When did humans start recording recipes in cookbooks? William Sitwell has written "A History of Food in 100 Recipes."

Computer Science And Social Justice
Computer science technologies play a powerful role in service of the military and industry, but don’t seem to be widely used by visionaries in the fields of social justice and sustainability. Ideas like complexity theory and nanotechnology seem to have a distant connection to making an impact on social change. Mathematician Dr. Ron Eglash believes in the power of computing for social justice and sustainability. He explored the state of technology today and how it can impact future social change in his work as co-editor of recent book “Appropriating Technology.”

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