parenting

Flickr Photo/Mara (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Kirsten Johansen, senior director of clinical operations at Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest, about today's recommendation from the American Academy of Pediatrics that teenage girls who have sex should use intrauterine devices or hormonal implants.

Courtesy of Che-Wei Wang

Jeannie Yandel talks to Beth Kolko, a professor at the University of Washington and co-founder of Shift Labs, about MIT's "Make The Breast Pump Not Suck" hack-a-thon.

In many communities, the local school district is the largest food provider, filling thousands of hungry bellies every day. But trying to feed healthful food to some of the pickiest eaters can result in mountains of wasted food.

Now, many schools are finding that giving kids a say in what they eat can cut down on what ends up in the trash.

Depression is common in teenagers, with 11 percent being diagnosed by age 18, and many more having depressive symptoms. Social and academic stress can trigger depression, and rates of depression tend to peak in adolescence around the age of 16.

It doesn't help that stressed-out teens often fall into hopelessness, says David Yeager, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. "When kids have hard things happen to them, they think it'll be like that way into the future."

For decades, OB-GYNs have offered prenatal tests to expectant moms to uncover potential issues, including Down syndrome, before they give birth. However, some tests, such as amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling, carry health risks, including miscarriage. For some women, the risks can be greater than the potential benefits from information they would gain.

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Dr. Danielle Zerr, head of pediatric infectious diseases at Seattle Children’s Hospital, about how to recognize and prevent enterovirus D68, a rare and potentially severe respiratory virus.

Marcie Sillman talks with KUOW's Ruby DeLuna about the spread of enterovirus D68 in King County.

How To Make The Most Of Your 10 Minutes With Teacher

Sep 18, 2014

So you finally get the chance to meet one on one with your child's teacher — now what?

Like a good Boy Scout, be prepared: Educators agree that doing your homework before a parent-teacher conference can make a big difference.

We all know which kid Mom and Dad liked best, and odds are you're thinking it's not you.

But does that really make a difference? It can, researchers say, but not always the way you might think.

Less-favored children are more likely to be using drugs, alcohol and cigarettes as teenagers, according to researchers at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah.

But what matters is not how the parents actually treat the children, but how the kids perceive it.

Public health authorities in Washington and Idaho are now investigating at least 79 cases of a serious respiratory illness that affects children.

Minnesota Vikings star Adrian Peterson was placed on the inactive list late last week after a Texas grand jury indicted him on a child abuse charge.

Peterson’s four year old child had to go the the hospital after his father beat him with a stick. But Peterson says he was just disciplining his child.

The incident has raised questions about the use of corporal punishment as a form of discipline in the African-American community.

When your child has an earache or a bad cold, it's hard to think that there's not much you can offer beyond Tylenol and sympathy. But most of those infections are mostly caused by viruses that don't respond to antibiotics, a study finds.

Just 27 percent of acute respiratory tract infections are caused by bacteria, researchers at Seattle Children's Hospital found. That means that more than two-thirds are viral and antibiotics don't help.

If you have ever seen, or spent time with (or, God forbid, had to live with) a colicky baby, this will make perfect sense to you. It may not make actual sense, but when the baby is crying you don't think very straight.

Janna Espinoza's daughter Coraline has hearing loss, cerebral palsy, epilepsy and developmental delays. Nearly 2 years old, she can't sit up, stand, creep or use her hands as a typically developing child does.

Coraline is among an estimated 6.4 million children in the U.S. with a disability. And for these kids the simple ritual of playing outside can get very complicated.

"My daughter can't do very much at a typical playground, except watch her older sister play," says Espinoza. "Playgrounds are a depressing place for us."

What We’re Really Saying When We Call Kids ‘Smart’

Sep 9, 2014
education kid school
Flickr Photo/jeweledlion (CC-BY-NC-ND)

So many first day of school pictures today!

In posting one of them, my friend Gwyn revealed that her smiling daughter had actually been more upset than she appeared in the photo.

Not because school had started, but because she wasn’t in the “smart kids” class with her friends. She knew it was for “smart kids” because those kids had said so. They had heard it from their parents.

These are six-year-olds.

Pages