parenting

The Perils Of Helicopter Parenting On Halloween

Oct 30, 2014
Flickr Photo/Jim Loter (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Peter Gray, research professor at Boston College, about how allowing children freedom while trick-or-treating helps them mature. Gray is the author of "Free to Learn: Why Unleashing the Instinct to Play Will Make Our Children Happier, More Self-Reliant, and Better Students for Life." 

What's Your Favorite Color, Sweetheart? 'The Blood'

Oct 30, 2014
Courtesy Woerner family

It's Halloween, and you probably have your own family tradition. Carving a jack-o-lantern, dressing up, eating too much candy.

For Seattleite Matt Woerner, it’s watching horror films with his 4-year-old daughter, Chloe.

This story is part of the New Boom series on millennials in America.

So your child moved back in with you after graduation, and it seems like she will never leave. Or worse, you're sending rent checks each month while she searches for jobs in the big city.

You often find yourself wondering if she will ever grow up. You're concerned that your child is suffering from delayed adolescence.

Decades ago, an "oops" pregnancy might have meant a rush to the altar. But when Michelle Sheridan got pregnant three years ago, the topic of marriage never came up with her boyfriend, Phillip Underwood, whom she lives with in Frederick, Md.

If anything, it was the opposite.

"It changes the dynamic of the household," she says. "I had a friend who put off her marriage. Got pregnant, and she's like, 'Let's just wait, 'cause we don't know if we're going to be able to make it through this.' "

Flickr Photo/Dan Hatton (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Instead of vaccinating her children for chickenpox, Kimberly Christensen chose the old fashioned way to immunize them – sending her kids to hang out with infected children. 

What Poverty Can Do To A Baby's Brain

Oct 12, 2014
Courtesy of Neighborcare Health

“Myth or fact? Smoking anywhere around the baby can increase the risk of infant death.”

A half dozen pregnant women at the Columbia Public Health Center in South Seattle take turns reading statements about infant care and discussing whether they agree with the claims.

Courtesy of Highline Public Schools

In a modern kindergarten class, you rarely see one lesson underway at once.

At Bow Lake Elementary in SeaTac, these new kindergarteners are studying reading – and social skills – and how to work as a group.

PoorStart
KUOW Photo/Nick Danielson

Last year, Velma Chaney and her fiancé moved to Seattle from Mississippi with their three young children in search of a stronger job market. Her sister and nephew came too.

KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

  On a sunny afternoon, 18-year-old Margaret Rim bounces her infant son on her knee in an empty classroom at South Lake High School.

A public health nurse, Emma Spohn, sits down next to her.

PoorStart
KUOW Photo/Nick Danielson

Preschool can look like fun and games.

But high-quality preschools use play to teach children the academic, social and developmental skills that they’ll need for kindergarten.

Sonia Vasquez raised her daughter, Tina, just outside New York City. And when money was tight, Sonia would take on multiple jobs to pay the bills.

"I was a day care provider. I work at the gym in the deli. I take care of the elderly," Sonia, now 63, told her daughter, now 29, during a recent visit with StoryCorps.

One night, while going home, she was so exhausted that she fell asleep at the wheel. Luckily, it was at a red light.

At times, she says, she feared it was taking a toll on her ability to be a good mom.

KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

At the Alaska Airlines ticket counter at Sea-Tac Airport, parents Ron and Christine Vega wait for their boarding passes.

Their son, Gibson, 5, carries a blue backpack that has essentials for a mock airplane trip: snacks, things to keep him preoccupied and a white cloth towel that helps him deal with stress.

The walls are lined with robots and movie posters for Star Wars and Back to the Future. But this is no 1980s nerd den. It's the technology lab at Westside Neighborhood School in Los Angeles, and the domain of its ed-tech coordinator, Don Fitz-Roy.

"So we're gonna be talking about digital citizenship today."

Flickr Photo/Mara (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Kirsten Johansen, senior director of clinical operations at Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest, about today's recommendation from the American Academy of Pediatrics that teenage girls who have sex should use intrauterine devices or hormonal implants.

Courtesy of Che-Wei Wang

Jeannie Yandel talks to Beth Kolko, a professor at the University of Washington and co-founder of Shift Labs, about MIT's "Make The Breast Pump Not Suck" hack-a-thon.

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