parenting

This week, NPR Ed is focusing on questions about why people play and how play relates to learning.

When it comes to brain development, time in the classroom may be less important than time on the playground.

Why Drowning Is A 'Cultural Condition'

Aug 5, 2014
KUOW Photo/Phyllis Fletcher

Public health researchers have struggled with a leading cause of death in young children: drowning.

Black children face the highest risk – even when they're supervised. The most recent data for Washington state shows black children have more than 3.5 times the drowning risk of children of any other race.

By 7 a.m., the sun still hasn't come to Philadelphia. But the snowflakes have — a dusting that seems, in the opening lines of Marie-Helene Bertino's debut, to touch every crevice of the city. It's the kind of magic you might expect of a Disney film. For a tender moment, it appears we're in for a love letter to Philly, the kind of novel that elevates a place to the status of hero. And kindly, Philly even offers a reply of its own.

"Good morning, the city says. [F- - -] you."

When Nimco Ali was 7, she thought her family was going on vacation. They flew from their hometown in Manchester, England, to Djibouti on the Horn of Africa.

Ali doesn't remember the exact location. But she clearly remembers what happened there.

The young girl found herself in a dingy room, with a woman dressed in all black, standing over her. She didn't know what was going on at the time. But she fell asleep. And when Ali woke up, she was confused.

The woman had mutilated her genitals.

When Kids Start Playing To Win

Aug 5, 2014

This week, NPR Ed is focusing on questions about why people play and how play relates to learning.

It's a playful word that's developed something of a bad reputation: "competition." The fear among some parents is that, once children start playing to win, at around 5 years old, losing isn't just hard. It's devastating.

Flickr Photo/Paolo Marconi (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with Jessica Sommerville, psychology professor at the University of Washington, about her recent study that explores how babies perceive justice.

Brains At Play

Aug 4, 2014

This week at NPR Ed, our series Playing To Learn will explore questions about why people play and how play relates to learning.

Months after a girl took the company to task for its female toy figures, Lego has released the Research Institute, a play set created by a "real-life geophysicist, Ellen Kooijman," the company says.

Flickr Photo/Barnaby Wasson (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The backers of an initiative to increase pay and training for child care workers in Seattle have filed suit against the city for the way the measure will appear on the fall ballot.

KUOW’s Ann Dornfeld reports.

Courtesy of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

More moms are breastfeeding than ever before, which is great. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is proud of you, breastfeeding moms.

And Washington mamas and providers have reason to be even more proud: About 92 percent of babies born here in 2011 were breastfed at birth, according to an annual CDC Breastfeeding Report Card. (Nationwide, 79 percent of infants are breastfed at birth.)

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Growing Up.

About Jennifer Senior's TEDTalk

Journalist Jennifer Senior says the goal of raising happy children is so elusive it has put modern, middle-class parents into a panic. She says there's no right way to parent.

About Jennifer Senior

A new law in Bolivia allows children as young as 10 to work legally, and has led to sharp criticism from many international human rights groups who note that it goes against a United Nations convention setting a minimum age of 14.

But supporters of the legislation say that the law guarantees legal protections and fair wages for children, who have been working regardless of laws against it.

Many Kids Who Are Obese Or Overweight Don't Know It

Jul 23, 2014

Kids can be cruel, especially about weight. So you might think overweight or obese children know all too well that they're heavy — thanks to playground politics. But that's not necessarily so, according to government data covering about 6,100 kids and teens ages 8-15.

About 30 percent "misperceived" their weight status (underweight, normal weight, overweight or obese), according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. (The CDC bases those categories on body mass index, adjusted for gender and age.)

Courtesy of Lynne Hogan

Earlier this month KUOW introduced you to Lynne Hogan, 48, one of hundreds of Washington adoptees seeking information about their birth parents. A new law that took effect July 1 gave adoptees access to their birth records through the Washington State Department of Health.

The Truth About Miscarriages

Jul 16, 2014

More than one in seven pregnancies result in miscarriage. But miscarriage is still often misunderstood by many couples — some of whom become discouraged and may seek help though reproductive technology such as drug and IVF treatments, when there is no need to do so.

Miscarriages may be widely misunderstood because they are not often talked about by people who have experienced them.

“Virtually every woman has either had one or has a friend who has had one.
– Dr. Michael Greene

on miscarriages

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