parenting

In the 1960s in California, the state wanted children to be adopted into two-parent homes. But officials were having trouble placing hundreds of children, especially older boys.

Bill Jones, a gay man living in San Francisco, had always wanted to be a father. He decided to apply.

"They were looking for somebody with family in the area and I had family in the area," Jones told his friend Stu Maddux, on a recent visit to StoryCorps. "They were looking for somebody that had some contact with children. I had been a schoolteacher for six years."

education kid school
Flickr Photo/jeweledlion (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Calyn Holdaway, mother of three special needs students who have been physically restrained and isolated in Washington's public schools.

Also, we hear from Veronica Cook, a special education teacher in the Shoreline school district. 

Lawmakers say kids are physically restrained or isolated too often in public schools. A bill currently in front of the state legislature aims to address this issue by tightening regulations.

Parents have made news recently after being detained for purposefully leaving children on their own, prompting renewed debate about so-called "free-range parenting."

That includes Danielle and Alexander Meitiv, a Silver Spring, Md., couple who are being investigated after they let their children, ages 10 and 6, walk home from a park last month by themselves.

health flu shot
Flickr Photo/Government of Alberta (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The same question goes for non-vaccinating parents: What’s the right strategy? Also: yet another questionable fatal police shooting, this time in our state. And what will politics be like without comedic news anchors John Stewart and Stephen Colbert? Finally, Seattle has a new earthquake alert, what will you do with your five seconds?

Bill Radke analyzes the week’s news with Luke Burbank, Joni Balter and Knute Berger.

Note to our podcasters: The team also discussed the possible resignation of Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber. He formally announced his resignation after the show aired. 

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Some parents don’t know how to parent.

When their lack of parenting skills put the child in danger, that’s when the state comes knocking – to take their children away. Nearly 7,000 kids in Washington state were placed in foster care last year.

Washington is under court order to keep foster youth from running away. So the state now has a team of “locators”--social workers whose job it is to find runaways and bring them back.

Our "Tools of the Trade" series is taking a look at some of the iconic objects that form a vital part of our educational lives. For an upcoming piece, I'm reporting on how young children learn through that most basic of preschool education tools: simple wooden blocks.

Rural Thurston County, Washington, is the kind of place people move to for a little elbow room. But if you’re a teenager from the suburbs, life can be less than exciting.

File photo of a flu shot.
Flickr Photo/Fort Meade (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Dr. Douglas Diekema about why some parents don't vaccinate their children. Diekema is professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington and an emergency room physician at Seattle Children's Hospital.

The ongoing measles outbreak linked to Disneyland has led to some harsh comments about parents who don't vaccinate their kids. But Juniper Russo, a writer in Chattanooga, Tenn., says she understands those parents because she used to be one of them.

"I know what it's like to be scared and just want to protect your children, and make the wrong decisions," Russo says.

Author Sharma Shields with her new novel, "The Sasquatch Hunter's Almanac."
Screenshot from YouTube

Jeannie Yandel talks with author Sharma Shields about her latest novel, "The Sasquatch Hunter's Almanac," and what monsters represent for her as a writer and a parent. 

Mama, I Was Supposed To Be Born A Girl

Jan 29, 2015
Marlo Mack and her daughter. Marlo's daughter is part of a University of Washington study on the lives of trans children.
Courtesy of Marlo Mack

My son was barely 3 years old when he informed me that … I didn’t have a son.

He looked me square in the eyes and said, “Mama, I think something went wrong when I was in your tummy, because I was supposed to be born a girl, but I was born a boy instead.” 

He begged me to put him back in the womb to right the wrong. He was sobbing.

The First Time My Mother Lied To Me

Jan 27, 2015
Storyteller Silas Lindenstein, center, with his parents at his high school graduation in Massachusetts.
Courtesy Silas Lindenstein

It was summer of 1992, and I had just graduated from high school in a small town, Millis, Massachusetts, where I had been living with my mother and stepfather for the previous seven years.

I was flying out to California to go to college. When I got to California, I called my mother to let her know that I was there safe. And she commented that when I went down the airport terminal I never looked back once. And I didn’t.

Flickr Photo/Barnaby Wasson (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Tonight on KUOW Spotlight, we present the latest episode of Reveal.

Part 1: The Murkiness Of American Day Care Reports

State inspection reports of day care providers are public record, but accessing them is still a problem for many parents. Washington state posts records online, but more than a dozen states don’t.

When Amy Seitz got pregnant with her second child last year, she knew that being 35 years old meant there was an increased chance of chromosomal disorders like Down syndrome. She wanted to be screened, and she knew just what kind of screening she wanted — a test that's so new, some women and doctors don't quite realize what they've signed up for.

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