parenting

RadioActive Youth Media
1:28 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Life Of A Sneakerhead: One To Rock, One To Stock

RadioActive youth reporter Mohamed Mohamed is a self-described sneakerhead. Here he poses with his RadioActive workshop diploma and one of his pairs of kicks.
Credit KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Hieu Phan, 18, is a “sneakerhead” – he collects shoes that are rare and have trading value.

Phan remembers watching reruns of the Olympics with his dad when he was very young. When Michael Jordan was on the bench lacing up his sneakers in the second quarter, his shoes caught Phan's eyes. It was a special moment for him, but not as special as when he finally got his own pair of the same shoes Jordan had been wearing: Air Jordan Olympic 7.

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Environment
7:39 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Public Voices Concerns Over WA Birth Defect Increases

At a meeting in Kennewick, the health department asked people to raise concerns about a rare birth defect that officials may not have considered yet. Twenty-three babies were born with anencephaly in Central Washington from 2010-2013.
Courtney Flatt

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 10:29 pm

KENNEWICK, Wash. -- Over the past three years, a rare birth defect has shown up Central Washington at a rate that's four times the national average. Now, the state health department is turning to the public for clues about what’s causing the fatal condition.

Anencephaly is a rare, fatal birth defect. During the fourth week of pregnancy, the baby’s brain and skull don’t form completely. If babies survive the pregnancy they often live for only a few days.

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Adventure Playgrounds
2:25 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

The Emerging Movement To Make Play More Risky

David Hyde speaks with Atlantic writer Hanna Rosin about the emerging movement to create playgrounds that foster independence and creativity, and to the Recreation Supervisor on Mercer Island, which started one of the first “Adventure Playgrounds” in the U.S.  

State-Funded Pre-K
8:26 am
Wed May 14, 2014

Pre-K Enrollment Down; Northwest Especially Low

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 6:10 pm

The number of preschoolers enrolled in state-funded early childhood education programs is dropping nationally.

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Health
10:15 am
Tue May 13, 2014

A Northwest Project To Curb Allergies, One Peanut At A Time

The trial involves wearing a skin patch that contains a small amount of peanut protein.
Credit KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

David Baty remembers the first time he gave his son Spencer, 10, some peanuts.

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Comedy
10:28 am
Mon May 12, 2014

The Pains Of Parenting, And Other Life Lessons From Louis C.K.

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 5:49 am

Louis C.K. has made a career in comedy by going places others won't. He can be shockingly crude and deeply insightful in the same sentence.

In his Emmy-award winning TV show called Louie, the comedian basically plays himself — a divorced standup comic in New York with two kids. Season 4 of the show kicked off last week.

Louie is "right where I started him, really," he tells NPR's Rachel Martin. "Some stuff happened, but he ended up back where he was, which sort of is the way things work. It's a zero-sum game, at times."

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Mother's Day
2:45 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

Looking Back: A Young Irish Mom's Painful Decision

In 1988, Sian Cullen was an Irish teenager who had fallen in love with an older guy. Their relationship was brief and she got pregnant. Cullen, now a hairstylist in Seattle, told KUOW's Isolde Raftery about the biggest decision of her life: Whether to give up her newborn for adoption.

Breastfeeding
5:31 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

Where Do You Pump At Work?

The "lactation room" at KUOW Public Radio. It looks pretty wired, but it's private and there's a soothing humming sound.
Credit KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Hey mamas!

I'm thinking about putting together a slideshow of spaces where women work. As many of you know, federal law requires that workplaces make space for women to pump — but what that space looks like varies wildly.

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Helping China's Orphans
10:30 am
Thu May 1, 2014

'Wish You Happy Forever' With Jenny Bowen

Credit Jenny Bowen's book "Wish You Happy Forever."

In 1996 Jenny Bowen was in Los Angeles living a comfortable and, she said, not very meaningful existence.

Reading the New York Times one Saturday morning, she and her husband were disturbed by a photo of a little girl in a Chinese orphanage. Bowen’s determination to do something about what she’d seen would change her life, and ultimately the lives of orphans across China.

Bowen founded the organization Half the Sky to better the lives of orphan children living in China’s welfare institutions. Half the Sky operates programs for orphans from birth to adulthood.

All offer loving care, stimulation, education, all the kinds of things a child who lives in a family may have. The Chinese government has invited Half the Sky to train every child welfare worker in the country.

Jenny Bowen spoke at Town Hall Seattle on April 1. She is also the author of a book, "Wish You Happy Forever."

Genetic Changes
2:47 pm
Tue April 29, 2014

Mom's Diet Right Before Pregnancy Can Alter Baby's Genes

Even before you were a twinkle in your mom's eye, what she ate — and didn't eat enough of — may have helped shape you.
George Marks Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 6:59 am

Pregnant women have heard it time and time again: What you eat during those nine months can have long-term effects on your child's health.

Heck, one study even found that when pregnant women eat a diverse diet, the resulting babies are less picky in the foods they choose.

So what about mom's eating habits before she even knows she's pregnant?

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Apple Patent
12:25 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

Using Technology To Fix The Texting-While-Driving Problem

Driving while distracted by your phone is a nationwide problem. A new proposed phone function from Apple could play a big role in helping teens — and adults — avoid accidents.
Nils Kahle iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 2:29 pm

On a Wisconsin street, a woman in a white hoodie stands frozen in the act of stepping out of the road and onto the curb, her left hand reaching behind her. As part of a public service announcement, she explains why she's there, as string music slowly plays under her voice.

"I had my brother in my hand, and all of a sudden my hand was empty," Aurie says as a car drives past. Her little brother, 8 years old at the time of the PSA, was left paralyzed after being hit by a car driven by a texting driver.

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Innovative Preschool
2:03 am
Wed April 23, 2014

One Approach To Head Start: To Help Kids, Help Their Parents

Tiffany Contreras walks her daughter Kyndall, 4, to preschool at Disney Elementary in Tulsa, Okla.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 8:08 am

President Obama has called repeatedly on Congress to help states pay for "high-quality preschool" for all. In fact, those two words — "high quality" — appear time and again in the president's prepared remarks. They are also a refrain among early childhood education advocates and researchers. But what do they mean? And what separates the best of the nation's preschool programs from the rest?

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Anthropological Study
12:41 am
Mon April 21, 2014

For The Children's Sake, Put Down That Smartphone

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 9:29 am

It's not just kids who are overdoing screen time. Parents are often just as guilty of spending too much time checking smartphones and e-mail — and the consequences for their children can be troubling.

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Author Interview
2:55 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Seeking Reconciliation For Fathers And Sons

Credit Garth Stein's book, "How Evan Broke His Head and Other Secrets."

Steve Scher talks with Garth Stein, author of "How Evan Broke His Head and Other Secrets." The book is about the ways fathers and sons seek some peace and mutual acceptance as they age.

Program Venture Fund
9:52 am
Fri March 28, 2014

'A Weighty Subject:' A Family Comes To Terms With A Trans Child

A drawing by Bridget, who came out as trans when she was four years old.
Credit KUOW Photo/Rosette Royale

Her eyes focused on the arcade screen, Bridget awaits her moment of transformation.

The 9-year-old is playing the video game Ms. Pac-Man, where the title character eats a magic pellet that turns her into a super being. As Bridget grips the joystick, the sunlight streaming in through a nearby window highlights her features: She has a face full of freckles, glinting, grey eyes and brown hair that tumbles past her shoulders.

“I’m good at this,” she says of the game.

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