parenting

Health News
12:46 am
Mon December 23, 2013

Screening Newborns For Disease Can Leave Families In Limbo

Vera Wojtesta was one of 300 babies flagged by New York's newborn screening program as at risk of having life-threatening Krabbe disease.
Ben Shutts Courtesy of the Wojtesta family

Originally published on Tue December 24, 2013 1:24 pm

For Matthew and Brianne Wojtesta, it all started about a week after the birth of their daughter Vera. Matthew was picking up his son from kindergarten when he got a phone call.

It was their pediatrician, with some shocking news. Vera had been flagged by New York's newborn screening program as possibly having a potentially deadly disease, and would need to go see a neurologist the next day.

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RadioActive Youth Media
2:23 pm
Thu December 19, 2013

Tough Stories With Happy Endings: Religious Tension, A Pregnant Immigrant, And Youth Homelessness

Ridwan had a secret he was keeping from his friends.
KUOW Photo/Iman Mohamed

Stories from the newest RadioActive youth producers delve into the personal struggles of a boy scared to reveal his religion to his friends, a single immigrant mother, and a girl who is getting back on track academically after having her life derailed by homelessness.

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Fairy Tales
9:28 am
Mon December 16, 2013

New Princesses Rescue Girls From A Distressed Damselhood

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Princess Vinnea, guardian of plant life (left), and Princess Terra, protector of the land, examine one of many "gulavores" plaguing the land of Hortensis in the children's book Princess Vinnea and the Gulavores.
Courtesy Setsu Shigematsu

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 9:31 pm

The princess industry is lucrative: DVDs, dresses, crowns, theme parties. But the story of going to the ball and waiting for Prince Charming is outdated.

So one Southern California mom has created a new princess series with modern sensibilities. Creator Setsu Shigematsu recasts princesses as environmentally conscious and not waiting around to be rescued.

At the heart of her series, The Guardian Princess Alliance, is what animates any fairy tale: simple storytelling.

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Sports
12:56 pm
Wed December 11, 2013

The Real Soccer Moms: Elite Women Players Return After Giving Birth

Seattle Reign FC defender Stephanie Cox and her daughter Kaylee are greeted by Washington Spirit opponent (but US National teammate) Ali Krieger at a league game in July.
Credit Courtesy of mikerussellfoto.com/Mike Russell

When US Soccer announced last year where national team members would play in the inaugural season of the National Women’s Soccer League, Seattle Reign FC scored offensive powerhouse Amy Rodriguez.

But Rodriguez, 26, would never play a single game for Seattle.

After the teams were set, Rodriguez found out that she was pregnant and unavailable for the season. “We were quite surprised. We weren’t planning on starting a family this year,” Rodriguez told KUOW.

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2:27 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Kids In Europe's "Adventure Playgrounds" Allowed To Take Risks

Lead in text: 
A tradition in Europe since World War II, "adventure playgrounds" look like junkyards and may be just as dangerous. Adults watch from a distance, making gentle suggestions like "perhaps you might try putting the fire out this way?" The link below will take you to a fascinating radio documentary that calls into questions all our assumptions about childhood risks - and what kids might miss out on when we eliminate all those risks. Warning to parents: this piece may cause you to ache with a vague sense of unease.
July 30th, 2013 | by Erin Davis with help from Viki Merrick Transom is proud to premiere another piece from our Donor Fund-work subsidized by those of YOU who contribute to Transom. Adventure Playgrounds are public spaces for children that encourage managed risk. At a quick glance, they look like junkyards.
Women and Health
6:56 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Breast Milk Bought Online Has High Levels Of Bacteria

A lab technician at the Mothers' Milk Bank Northeast in Newton Upper Falls, Mass., prepares donated breast milk for pasteurization in August 2012. The process kills harmful bacteria.
Elise Amendola Associated Press

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 10:53 am

Online breast milk marketplaces can be a godsend for a mother who might not be producing enough for her baby but still wants her child to get the the health benefits of breast milk. But milk sold on one popular website had more bacterial contamination than that from a milk bank, a study finds.

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Parenting
10:06 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Random Bedtimes Breed Bad Behavior In Kids

Play now, pay later: consistency matters when it comes to kids and sleep.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 10:06 am

Parents learn the hard way that late bedtimes make for cranky kids the next day. But inconsistent bedtimes may have a greater effect on children's behavior, a study says.

Kids who didn't go to bed on a regular schedule had more behavior problems at home and at school. When those children were put to bed at the same time each night, their behavior improved.

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Health Care Exchange
12:07 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Back To Work After A Baby, But Without Health Insurance

People get information on California's health exchange at a table at Union Station in Los Angeles on Tuesday, the exchange's opening day.
Reed Saxon AP

Originally published on Sat October 5, 2013 6:13 pm

Pardit Pri had health insurance until she decided to quit her job as a legal administrative assistant and stay home with her newborn son 20 months ago. She thought she'd have coverage by now. But it didn't work out that way.

"I knew that I wasn't going to be working for a while because I decided to stay home with my son, and I thought ... 'OK, fingers crossed. Nothing will happen during that time,' " she says, as she plays with her son in their Orange County, Calif., apartment.

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Child Care As Economic Indicator
5:27 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Job Recovery From Small Town To Big City

Lyman day care provider Amber Rooks.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

The economic downturn attributed to the Great Recession tested the resilience of many workers and careers.

King County’s unemployment rate is more than 2 percent lower than the national rate. In fact, the Seattle area is seen as a bright spot in the recovery. But the farther you get from the big city, the more likely a  different picture emerges. In some rural areas, incomes and job security are lower, and this has made for a tougher recovery.

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Math and Parenting
11:11 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Almost Everyone Can Master Algebra In 90 Minutes By Playing This Video Game

DragonBox Adaptive, a game developed by the UW Center for Game Science.
Credit UW Center for Game Science

Master Algebra in 90 Minutes: KUOW's Ross Reynolds interviews Zoran Popović from the UW Center for Game Design

The University of Washington's Center for Game Science has an outrageous claim: By playing a computer game called DragonBox Adaptive for 90 minutes, 92 percent of first graders can master algebraic linear equations.

But that's not just an untested claim — it's the result of tests done in Washington state's public schools. Amazingly, that statistic also held for the few kindergarten classes that have tested the game. Most school districts don't introduce this material until middle school. Today, Ross Reynolds speaks with the Center for Game Science's director, Zoran Popović.

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Internet Privacy
10:41 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Should Parents Post Baby Pics Online?

Michael Clinard

We’ve all seen them: cute baby pictures in our Facebook, Instagram or Twitter feeds. For many parents, it’s hard to resist the temptation to share just how adorable their kid looks in their first rain boots or winter hat. But some are saying parents should pause before hitting that "share" button. Marcie Sillman talks with Amy Webb about why she doesn’t post anything about her daughter online.

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Princess Culture
8:00 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

"Cinderella Ate My Daughter" With Peggy Orenstein

Peggy Orenstein's book "Cinderella Ate My Daughter."

Pink is no longer just a color for young girls — it’s a lifestyle. It celebrates girlhood, but more alarmingly, it fuses girlhood to an obsession with appearance, argues Peggy Orenstein.

Orenstein, an author and the mother of a young girl, was shocked by today’s “princess culture” that forces girls to value material objects and looking pretty over individuality. To research this phenomenon, Orenstein braved toddler beauty pageants, Disneyland and Miley Cyrus concerts, and her resulting book is a tough examination of the girlie-girl culture and its effect on young girls’ identities and futures.

Orenstein spoke at Seattle’s Town Hall on February 15, 2012.

Adaptive Playgrounds
9:17 am
Tue August 27, 2013

For Kids With Special Needs, More Places To Play

Brooklyn Fisher rolls down the ramp on the playground named for her in Pocatello, Idaho. The playground was built using accessible features so children of all abilities could play alongside each other.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 3:31 pm

Remember running around the playground when you were a kid? Maybe hanging from the monkey bars or seeing who could swing the highest?

It wasn't just a mindless energy burn. Many have called play the work of childhood. Play teaches children how to make friends, make rules and navigate relationships.

But for kids whose disabilities keep them from using playgrounds, those opportunities can be lost.

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Demographics
10:46 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Does Fewer Kids Mean Less Kid Friendly? Raising Children In Jet City

Flickr Photo/Michael Hanscom

 Seattle has one of the lowest populations of children in the United States. What does it mean when a city goes from a playground for kids to a playground for the rich? Ross Reynolds talks with Ali Modarres, professor of urban geography at California State University and co-author of a new report on the Childless City. And listeners answer the questions: Do you think is a bad place to raise kids? Did you leave the city to raise your kids in Shoreline or Bellevue? 

Climate Change
9:00 am
Tue August 6, 2013

MLB Suspensions, Technology And Sexuality, And William Ruckelsaus

Flickr Photo/Alex Abian

MLB Suspensions
Major League Baseball has handed down lengthy suspensions to more than a dozen players for using performance enhancing drugs, among them: former Seattle Mariner (and current New York Yankee) Alex Rodriguez. He was suspended for the remainder of this season and all of next season. A player in the Mariners’ minor league system was also suspended: Tacoma Rainiers catcher Jesus Montero. What do these suspensions say about the state of drug use in baseball?

Technology-Enabled Sexual Landscape
Technology has changed when and how kids are exposed to sexual activity.  Gone are the dirty magazines under the mattress.  On average, kids are exposed to full action, hardcore sexual activity by age 10.  How is this changing the behavior and expectations of teenagers?  How can you help your kids navigate a technology-enabled sexual landscape?

Climate Change And The Republican Party  
Former head of the Environmental Protection Agency and former co-chair of the Puget Sound Partnership, William Ruckelsaus explains why the Republican Party needs to take action on climate change.

The Weather and Hike of the Week
Michael Fagin suggests a hike that matches the week’s weather forecast.
 

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