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outdoors

The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service will hold public meetings the week October 12 in Richland, Washington, about opening Rattlesnake Mountain to the public.

Sen. Henry M. "Scoop" Jackson fishes with his son, Peter, on an unnamed lake in an undated photo.
Courtesy of Henry M. Jackson Foundation

The federal Land and Water Conservation Fund paid for state, federal and local parks without any taxes, relying on royalty money from federal oil and gas leases. Or at least it did until Republicans recently killed it by letting the funding expire.

Heather Anderson, trail name Anish, posted this picture of herself after beating the Appalachian Trail unsupported record.
Facebook Photo/Anish Hikes

A Seattle-area woman has set a new speed record for an unsupported hike along the Appalachian Trail: 54 days, 7 hours, 48 minutes.

To put Heather Anderson’s feat in perspective:

Howard Lake, north of Stehekin in Washington's North Cascades.
Courtesy of Mike Annee

Several years ago a Seattle man hiked into a lake in the North Cascades that had an unusual name:  Coon Lake.

Jonathan Rosenblum thought that sounded racist. "This was a wrong that needed to be corrected," he told David Hyde on KUOW's The Record.

He convinced Washington state officials to change the name to Howard Lake after Wilson Howard, a miner who staked claims in the area and was one of only two black miners to stake claims in the North Cascades.

David Calahan (left) and Chandra LeGue (center) hike up a trail in Southern Oregon. LeGue is carrying the Google Trekker to photograph the sights.
EarthFix Photo/Jes Burns

Earlier this summer, EarthFix reporter Jes Burns took us on a walk in the Southern Oregon woods with Oregon Wild. The conservation group had been chosen by Google to use a backpack-mounted Trekker camera. The plan was to document trails on Bureau of Land Management lands that could be affected by upcoming changes to how the forests are managed.    

Mount Baker glacier as seen from a helicopter in 2009.
Flickr Photo/judy_and_ed (CC BY NC 2.0)

Jeannie Yandel talks with Seattle Times science reporter Sandi Doughton about her story on the alarming melting of Northwest glaciers due to hot weather and low snowpack. Scientists say glaciers across the North Cascades could shrink by as much as 10 percent this year.

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack announced a key step Friday in completing a 1,200 mile trail from Glacier National Park to the Pacific Ocean.

Hikers already use what's called the "Pacific Northwest Trail," but it has gaps, and isn't fully built out.

Vilsack has named 23 advisers to help finalize the trail corridor, including Jon Knechtel with the Pacific Northwest Trail Association.

North America's highest mountain has a new name. Or rather, an old one. President Obama has announced that Alaska's Mount McKinley will now be called Denali, which is what natives call the peak.

Twenty-two-year-old professional rock climber Sasha DiGiulian is attempting to become the first woman to scale the Paciencia route on the north face of Mount Eiger. The peak in the Swiss Alps is known as the "Wall Of Death."

The giant sequoias in the Sierra Nevada are one of America's treasures, but for the first time in Sequoia National Park's history, the trees are showing visible signs of exhaustion due to the drought.

On a hike last summer, a scientist noticed that the needles of the giant sequoias were browning and more sparse than usual. This finding got ecologists thinking: Did the drought cause this?

Everyone is accounted for and no one was injured by a flash flood and debris flow in Mount Rainier National Park. It happened Thursday when the terminus of the South Tahoma Glacier broke off and released trapped meltwater.

DNA tests confirm a captured grizzly bear was the animal that killed Lance Crosby while he was hiking in Yellowstone National Park last week. The bear was put down Thursday, according to a National Park Service news release.

The tests also conclude that, in addition to the adult grizzly, cubs were at the site of the attack, the statement says:

Idaho fish and game regulators want there to be no doubt that hunters cannot use drones. In Oregon as well, lawmakers have tried to head off a fair chase issue before it rears its head.

When people go hiking these days, all kinds of gadgets can help guide their way. But historically, humans used something a lot more low-tech: a pile of rocks.

The piles, technically called cairns, have marked trails for millennia, but in recent years, these stones have become steeped in controversy.

To Beth Dinet, stacking stones provides "an overwhelming sense of peace, and connecting with onenness."

Dawn Brown in a trailer for the documentary 'A New High.'
YouTube

Jeannie Yandel talks with Dawn Brown, a participant in Seattle Union Gospel Mission's program that takes a team of homeless people who are also struggling with addiction up Mount Rainier. Brown's experience is chronicled in a new documentary, "A New High."

Oregon and Washington officials are curtailing fishing starting Saturday on many of the states' rivers in hope of helping salmon, trout and steelhead survive drought conditions.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is imposing restrictions on 30 of the state's rivers. On some waterways it will be a complete closures; on others the prohibition takes effect from 2 p.m. until midnight.

home, house, housing: An aerial shot of the Greenwood neighborhood in Seattle, 1969.
Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives (CC-BY-NC-ND)

A draft city report pokes at Seattle’s single-family character. Also: Why don’t we rope off the dangerous Big Four Ice Caves in the Cascades? Would a Seattle gun tax infringe on your right to bear arms? And in a super-dry Seattle summer, should you be conserving water, or not?

Bill Radke debates the week’s news with Crosscut's Knute Berger, journalist Tonya Mosley and former state GOP chair Chris Vance.

A view from the Big 4 ice caves in Washington from December 2014. Last weekend, warm weather caused a collapsed that killed one hiker and injured five others.
Flickr Photo/Michael Matti (CC BY NC ND 2.0)

Kim Malcolm talks to Doug Clark, associate professor of geology at Western Washington University, about the different types of ice caves, how they are formed and their risks.

Living witnesses to the forced relocation of West Coast Japanese-Americans during World War II are growing fewer every year. Many who were incarcerated are in their 80s and 90s now.

David Whitmer from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife pumps rainbow trout into Seattle’s Green Lake on Friday, June 19, to the delight of a crowd of anglers and passersby.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Watched by an eager crowd, two trucks backed carefully toward Green Lake, their tanks awash in black water and something more. It’s time to plant trout.

It might not seem sporting, but the large rainbows that were pumped into Green Lake last Friday provide some city dwellers their only chance to fish – and it’s practically in their own back yards, said David Whitmer of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. He and co-worker Scott Meechan had just driven their tanker trucks down from the state hatchery in Arlington.

An example of animal bridge on the Flathead Indian Reservation in Montana. Washington is building wildlife overpasses over I-90 near Snoqualmie Pass.
Flickr Photo/Jitze Couperus

Ross Reynolds talks with Washington State Department of Transportation project manager Brian White about the new wildlife overpass that connects habitat on either side of I-90 east of Snoqualmie Pass. It will be part of a project that also includes underpasses already in place near Gold Creek.

Crater Lake National Park, Oregon.
Courtesy of Nicole Lux

Ross Reynolds interviews journalist Emma Marris about her recent essay in Orion magazine about human intervention to save endangered species in wilderness areas.

Marris explores the example of  Oregon’s Crater Lake National Park where seeds, grown from cones for two years at the Dorena Genetic Resource Center near Cottage Grove, Oregon, are being planted to preserve dying whitebark pine trees.

A team of 13 Afghan women is training to climb the country's highest mountain. Only two Afghans — both men — have ever made it to the 24,580-foot-high summit. NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson has been following the female mountaineers' progress. You can read and listen to the previous report here.

David Hyde talks to Seattle freelance writer Christopher Solomon about glamping, or glamorous camping, in Washington State parks.

Attention seagulls: neither of the creatures shown here are Wayne Kinslow.
Flickr Photo/Yuri Levchenko (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Wayne Kinslow about surpassing 1,000 days swimming in Puget Sound.

Officials from the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare are asking people to take precautions around ground squirrels after a squirrel south of Boise tested positive for plague.

A compromise plan to designate 275,000 acres of wilderness in central Idaho got a much-anticipated hearing in the U.S. Senate Thursday.

Some of Oregon’s most colorful hills could see increased protections under legislation introduced Thursday.

Oregon Senator Jeff Merkley is proposing to create 58,000 new acres of Wilderness covering the Painted Hills and Sutton Mountain. The area is located northeast of Prineville in Eastern Oregon.

The bill also proposes a 2000-acre land transfer from the Bureau of Land Management to Wheeler County for economic development projects, like a new RV park.

Skiing Leg Of Iconic Bend Race Cancelled

May 6, 2015

Organizers for Bend's Pole, Pedal, Paddle race have cancelled the cross country skiing leg of the annual athletic event due to lack of snow.

The Pole, Pedal, Paddle is a multisport competition that combines skiing, cycling, running and boating into one big race. With very little snow left on the course, the event organizers have cancelled the nordic leg of the competition. Instead, athletes will complete a short trail run.

From Wenatchee, Washington, to Bend, Oregon, whitewater rafting guides are preparing for a flood of business as school lets out. But this year’s low snowpack could mean less whitewater and more demand for trips.

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