outdoors

America has more than 560 wildlife refuges. Most of them are what you’d expect: remote, untrammeled places where humans are visitors.

Susan Marie Conrad completed a solo kayak trip from Washington to Alaska in 2010.
Courtesy of Susan Marie Conrad

Ross Reynolds interviews Susan Conrad about her 1,200 mile solo kayak trip from Washington to Alaska. She recounts the 2010 trip in her new memoir, "Inside: One Woman’s Journey Through the Inside Passage."

REI's famous flagship store in downtown Seattle.
Flickr Photo/brewbooks (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/49tVma

REI workers are demanding better schedules and higher wages.

Monday night, employees from the outdoor equipment company shared their concerns publicly in a forum at Seattle's City Hall. City Councilmember Kshama Sawant helped organize the event.

Mount Rainier, or Tahoma, Tacobet, Ti'Swaq or Pooskaus.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with executive director of Washington's National Parks Fund Laurie Ward about Mount Rainier National Park winning ninth place in an online competition for grant money. The park won $42,000 to restore a cabin to house search and rescue volunteers. 

Mount Rainier, or Tahoma, Tacobet, Ti'Swaq or Pooskaus.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with Fitz Cahall about why we over think camping and how we can go camping on the fly. Cahall hosts the podcast The Dirtbag Diaries, stories about life in the outdoors. 

Can we make the wilderness less white?

Jun 30, 2016
Flickr Photo/Steve Snodgrass (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/e2A4sb

Bill Radke speaks with Jourdan Keith, founder and director of Urban Wilderness Works, about why she leads young people of color on 17-day camping trips in the North Cascades National Park.   

Water loving willows hug the edges of the shore. Lost Lake, at its peak, is around 79 acres. Right now, it is draining away.

About half way around from the lake entrance, a sharp eye might spot a footpath leading out onto the grassy, muddy lake bed. Follow that and soon the sound of rushing water is audible.

Then, there it is. The hole.

Dave Kretzing has a pretty good grasp on the mystery of Lost Lake. He's a retired hydrologist with the U.S. Forest Service and he's spent years thinking about what happens here and why.

Every place has its own sound. A small group of scientists is hard at work recording the natural sounds of national parks all across the U.S. — more than 70 soundscapes so far.

For our series on the centennial of the national parks, we traveled to Colorado, to find out how they create these portraits of sound.

First Lesson: It's Very Hard To Escape The Sound Of Humans.

Colorful acrylic paintings on red and gray rock formations and profiles of people smoking cigarettes, signed with a repetitive "Creepytings," caused an uproar on Reddit more than a year ago. Now, the uproar is calming.

After spending a month drawing and painting on the rocks in seven national parks, Casey Nocket, 23, of San Diego, was banned this month from national parks and other federally administered lands, according to the National Park Service.

As the weather teeters between 1997 DJ Jazzy Jeff and 2002 Nelly, we've been spending a lot of time staring out the window, wishing to be anywhere but inside: the beach, the pool, the basketball court, Grand Teton National Park.

Mount Rainier, or Tahoma, Tacobet, Ti'Swaq or Pooskaus.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Kim Malcolm talks with Laurie Ward about why Mount Rainier National Park is participating in an online contest to win grant money. Ward is executive director of Washington's National Park Fund. The park is hoping to restore a cabin that would provide housing for search and rescue volunteers.

She sails by the memory of the stars.

Her bones are lashed together with 6 miles of rope. Her twin wooden masts are lowered and outstretched only by the power of muscled arms. And once fully extended, the red, V-shaped sails announce who she is.

She is the Hokule'a, Hawaii's famous voyaging canoe, built in the double-hulled style used by Polynesian navigators thousands of years ago to cross the Pacific.

Climbers descend Mount Everest in good weather.
Courtesy Madison Mountaineering

Death again has marked the climbing season on Mount Everest: four climbers died last week and two more are missing.

Seattle-based guide Garrett Madison’s team was hit by tragedy last year. But he told KUOW’s Emily Fox there was no doubt that he would return to the world’s tallest mountain.

An inventory by public radio of Northwest geography found more than 200 places with names some people might consider ethnically or racially offensive. For instance, there's Negro Ben Mountain in southwest Oregon, Chinamans Hat in western Idaho, Jew Valley in southern Oregon and Redman Creek in north central Washington.

Oregon’s House Interim Committee on Rural Communities, Land Use and Water held a hearing Monday on potential conservation measures for a remote high desert and canyon land area known as the Owyhee in Southeast Oregon.

Pages