Oso

This post was updated at 1:45 p.m. ET.

The search continues in Oso, Wash., for victims of the massive mudslide that swept through about 50 homes and properties on March 22.

KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

One week after a massive landslide wiped out the community of Oso, Wash., community members gathered at Darrington's First Baptist Church on Sunday to pray and tell stories of survival.

KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

As the local community held Sunday church services a week after the devastating Oso mudslide, searchers continued their work in the sodden destruction zone.

The Snohomish County Medical Examiner confirmed on Sunday evening that 21 people have died in the mudslide. Of these, only 15 have been officially identified.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Flickr Photo/Snohomish County

The death toll has risen to 18 following the devastating landslide near Oso, Washington. One bright spot: The number of people missing has fallen dramatically. It's now down to 30. 

KUOW Photo/Phyllis Fletcher

It's been nearly a week since the devastating landslide occurred near Oso, Wash. During this week, we've brought you official updates on rescue and recovery, and the voices of witnesses, survivors and community members trying to help. Here's a look back at the past week, from people in their own words.

KUOW Photo/Phyllis Fletcher

Ross Reynolds speaks with Joel Reidenberg, who teaches law at Fordham and Princeton universities, about the ethical complexities of releasing the names of those missing or unaccounted for in the Oso mudslide. Reidenberg co-authored a report on privacy and missing persons after natural disasters.

Flickr Photo/pnwbot (CC BY-NC-ND)

Search and rescue efforts continue after a massive mudslide engulfed the town of Oso on March 22. A study out of Seattle Mayor Ed Murray's office finds who is making $15 minimum wage in the city, and the enrollment deadline for the Affordable Care Act approaches. 

Steve Scher reviews these stories and more with news analyst Joni Balter, Crosscut's Knute Berger, Eli Sanders of The Stranger and Livewire host Luke Burbank.

Washington Department of Natural Resources

Editor’s note: An earlier version of this story stated that land above the Oso landslide zone was logged in 2005. The site was logged in 2004 and replanted in 2005.

State officials say they didn't approve clear-cutting inside a no-logging zone directly above Saturday's deadly landslide that struck the town of Oso. But aerial photos show a clear-cut extending into the zone where a loss of trees would heighten the risk of landslides.

The waiting continues for family and friends of the dozens of people missing after last weekend's deadly landslide near Oso, Wash.

In a clearing on a hillside above one side of the mudflow, searchers in all sorts of uniforms and bright safety vests are picking through the crushed and barely recognizable remains of homes.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's day six of the search and rescue operation at the site of the landslide in Oso, Washington. The death toll stands right now at 26. Ninety people are still reported missing. That's left many families in limbo waiting for news. NPR's Martin Kaste reports on why the recovery work has been so excruciatingly slow.

Oso Mudslide Victims Likely To Face Financial Woes

Mar 27, 2014
Flickr Photo/GovInslee (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Jim Davis, editor of the Herald Business Journal in Everett, about the bleak financial outlook facing Oso victims whose homes were damaged in the recent mudslide.

"There are 1.5 million single-family homes in the state of Washington. Only 4,700 homeowners and business owners have landslide insurance," Davis said.

The Washington National Guard has now deployed two Black Hawk helicopters to the Oso landslide. On the ground, specially-trained search teams looked for victims in the mud and debris.

Courtesy of WSDOT / Bill McMillan

Editor’s note: An earlier version of this story stated that land above the Oso landslide zone was logged in 2005. The site was logged in 2004 and replanted in 2005.

Saturday's deadly slide was the latest in a long string of landslides to hit the area known as the Hazel or Oso slide along the North Fork Stillaguamish River.

State and tribal officials have known about and tried to block landslides on that spot for half a century.

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