Oso

Chief Willy Harper inside the Oso fire house. It has reverted to a quiet volunteer fire department in the months since the slide.
KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

Sunday marks one year since the Oso landslide. Highway 530 will shut down in the morning as people gather to commemorate the day.

Darrington Mayor Dan Rankin.
KCTS Photo/Aileen Imperial

Marcie Sillman talks with Dan Rankin, who was transformed from sawmill owner and part-time mayor of Darrington to full-time leader of a community facing its greatest challenge after the deadly mudslide in nearby Oso, Washington on March 22, 2014.

The site of the deadly Oso, Washington mudslide on March 22, 2014.
Flickr Photo/Washington State DNR (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to David Montgomery, University of Washington geology professor, about his geological recommendations for the state after last year's Oso landslide and how much progress has been made since the slide.

The site of the deadly Oso, Washington mudslide on March 22, 2014.
Flickr Photo/GovInslee (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Kim Malcolm talks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the policy changes state lawmakers are considering one year after the Oso landslide that killed 43 people. 

A Snohomish County Sheriff’s Deputy has been named “officer of the year” for his actions in the aftermath of the Oso landslide.

KUOW Photo/John Ryan

A state commission on landslides is urging nearly two dozen improvements in the way Washington state prepares for and responds to landslides.

Statewide mapping of landslide hazards, better funding and coordination for emergency responders, and "innovative" land-use regulations to improve public safety top the commission's preliminary list.

Courtesy of King County Sheriff's Office

State officials adopted a more cautious approach to logging near landslide-prone slopes on Wednesday.

The adoption of new, voluntary guidelines came in response to the Oso landslide that killed 43 people in March.  

Six months after 43 people lost their lives in the Oso landslide, nearly 60 legal claims have been filed against the state of Washington.

After Oso, Being Mayor Is Now A Full-Time Job

Sep 21, 2014
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KCTS Photo/Aileen Imperial

Darrington Mayor Dan Rankin grew up in this small town, like his father and his father before him. Though he moved away when he was younger, Rankin felt he had to move back. The town, he says, is something you can't get out of your soul.

In Oso, We Pulled Everybody Out Of The Mud

Sep 21, 2014
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KCTS Photo/Stacey Jenkins

Bob DeYoung helped recover bodies of friends and neighbors killed in the Oso slide. His wife Julie took care of people who survived. Today they're figuring out how to take care of their own needs.

After Oso, Reborn From Water And Mud

Sep 21, 2014
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KCTS Photo/Stacey Jenkins

Robin Youngblood cherished the nature around her home in Oso’s Steelhead Haven. When the landslide struck, she and a visiting friend were talking about a deer they had just seen. After the disaster, she left the Oso area. But something called her back. Now she lives a stone’s throw from state Route 530, a few miles east of the slide.

We Are All To Blame For The Oso Slide

Sep 21, 2014
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KCTS Photo/Katie Campbell

As a geomorphologist, Dan Miller has extensively studied the land formations and landslide history of the Stillaguamish Valley and Steelhead Haven. Miller and other scientists knew it to be a hazardous place, long before the devastating slide occurred. 

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KCTS Photo/Aileen Imperial

Gary Ray was the pastor at the Oso chapel in March. While doing work for the church on the morning of Saturday, March 22,  he received a call from another pastor in Darrington. There had been a massive landslide and he should come back, the pastor said. After the slide, Ray provided spiritual and emotional support for a community that prided itself on its strong sense of independence.

We're Staying In Oso, But Every Day We Say Goodbye

Sep 21, 2014
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KCTS Photo/Aileen Imperial

Ron Thompson was known as the mayor of Steelhead Drive. He and his wife Gail Thompson lost their home and many neighbors in the Oso landslide. But they’ve decided to stay in Oso, and start over in a new home just four miles from the old one. They find hope in rebuilding their community while striving to find meaning in the disaster.

John Ryan / KUOW

An independent commission will delve into the deadliest landslide in Washington history. The commission will seek statewide lessons from the Oso landslide, land use in the Oso area before the slide and the emergency response in the days and weeks afterward.

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