Oso

Lawyers for victims of the deadly 2014 Oso landslide say the state of Washington has engaged in a “shocking” cover-up to hide evidence. The allegation, first reported by The Seattle Times, comes just five weeks before the state goes on trial.

Ron Thompson, whose home was destroyed in the Oso, Washington, slide, had a full workshop. He continues to carve signs, including these at his new home behind the Oso fire station.
KCTS Photo/Aileen Imperial

Jeannie Yandel speaks with president of the Darrington Historical Society, Scott Morris, who has partnered with a group of students from University of Washington's Master of Library and Information Science program to collect and preserve historical documents and histories from the Oso landslide. 

New Oso Analysis Sheds Light On Landslide Risks

Dec 23, 2015
A massive mudslide on March 22, 2014 in Oso, Washington killed 43. Pictured here is the mudflow taken on Monday, March 24, 2014.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Big landslides like the one in Oso that killed 43 people last year are fairly common in Stillaguamish Valley. According to a new study from the University of Washington, one occurs about every 140 years. 

David Hyde talks to UW geology professor David Montgomery about what the research means for politicians and where people decide to build and live.

Washington forestry officials have updated state guidelines for evaluating unstable slopes that, if logged, could contribute to landslides.

Lawsuits against the Washington Department of Natural of Resources and Snohomish County over the deadly Oso landslide can go forward.

Chief Willy Harper inside the Oso fire house. It has reverted to a quiet volunteer fire department in the months since the slide.
KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

Sunday marks one year since the Oso landslide. Highway 530 will shut down in the morning as people gather to commemorate the day.

Darrington Mayor Dan Rankin.
KCTS Photo/Aileen Imperial

Marcie Sillman talks with Dan Rankin, who was transformed from sawmill owner and part-time mayor of Darrington to full-time leader of a community facing its greatest challenge after the deadly mudslide in nearby Oso, Washington on March 22, 2014.

The site of the deadly Oso, Washington mudslide on March 22, 2014.
Flickr Photo/Washington State DNR (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to David Montgomery, University of Washington geology professor, about his geological recommendations for the state after last year's Oso landslide and how much progress has been made since the slide.

The site of the deadly Oso, Washington mudslide on March 22, 2014.
Flickr Photo/GovInslee (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Kim Malcolm talks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the policy changes state lawmakers are considering one year after the Oso landslide that killed 43 people. 

A Snohomish County Sheriff’s Deputy has been named “officer of the year” for his actions in the aftermath of the Oso landslide.

KUOW Photo/John Ryan

A state commission on landslides is urging nearly two dozen improvements in the way Washington state prepares for and responds to landslides.

Statewide mapping of landslide hazards, better funding and coordination for emergency responders, and "innovative" land-use regulations to improve public safety top the commission's preliminary list.

Courtesy of King County Sheriff's Office

State officials adopted a more cautious approach to logging near landslide-prone slopes on Wednesday.

The adoption of new, voluntary guidelines came in response to the Oso landslide that killed 43 people in March.  

Six months after 43 people lost their lives in the Oso landslide, nearly 60 legal claims have been filed against the state of Washington.

After Oso, Being Mayor Is Now A Full-Time Job

Sep 21, 2014
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KCTS Photo/Aileen Imperial

Darrington Mayor Dan Rankin grew up in this small town, like his father and his father before him. Though he moved away when he was younger, Rankin felt he had to move back. The town, he says, is something you can't get out of your soul.

In Oso, We Pulled Everybody Out Of The Mud

Sep 21, 2014
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KCTS Photo/Stacey Jenkins

Bob DeYoung helped recover bodies of friends and neighbors killed in the Oso slide. His wife Julie took care of people who survived. Today they're figuring out how to take care of their own needs.

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