Orlando shooting | KUOW News and Information

Orlando shooting

Noor Salman, the wife of the man who killed 49 people last June at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Fla., has pleaded not guilty to two federal charges.

Salman was arrested earlier this week and charged with providing material support to a terrorist and obstruction of justice for allegedly knowing about Omar Mateen's plan to slaughter people at the nightclub.

It was the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history. Mateen was killed by police.

Two Orlando-area hospitals are waiving the medical bills of victims of the Pulse nightclub shooting, praising the community response and saying they want to contribute.

More than 50 people were wounded in the June 12 attack on the Florida gay nightclub, and 49 people died.

Orlando Regional Medical Center has treated 44 victims of the shooting — more than any other hospital. The center's parent company, Orlando Health, says it will not charge victims for their treatment, reports Abe Aboraya of member station WMFE.

AR-15 rifle with a Stag lower receiver California legal (only with fixed 10-round magazine)
Wikimedia Commons

The day after the Orlando nightclub shooting, Tami Michaels, a Seattle talk show host, took to Facebook.

Orlando nightclub killer Omar Mateen was shot at least eight times by police, according to an autopsy report released by the medical examiner in Orange County, Fla.

Mateen's attack on the Pulse nightclub left 49 people dead, and he was killed by law enforcement officers after an hours-long standoff.

The FBI held a press conference this morning to discuss calls Omar Mateen made to 911 before the shooting at the Pulse nightclub.

NPR national reporter John Burnett joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to discuss these calls and new details that have emerged in the F.B.I.’s investigation of the case.

Guest

John Burnett, NPR Southwest Correspondent. He tweets @radiobigtex

This weekend in Orlando, Fla., families are burying their loved ones — the people gunned down at Pulse nightclub. There are many different ways to grieve death. Sadness, remorse, rage. And then there's pure love.

If such a thing is possible, Daniel Alvear embodies it — in his feelings for his daughter, who died that night in Orlando, and for her killer.

'Week in Review' panel Gyasi Ross, Bill Radke, Joni Balter and Rob McKenna.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Early Sunday morning a man walked into a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida and massacred 49 people and injured 53 others. It's a tragedy that has raised questions for the nation over the safety and treatment of the LGBTQ community, gun violence, immigration and terrorism. We'll raise those questions with our panel.

The Senate is set to vote on four gun control measures Monday evening — and none of them is expected to pass.

Getting these votes scheduled was the singular goal of a 15-hour talking marathon Senate Democrats mounted on the Senate floor Wednesday. But because the outcome of the votes is already a foregone conclusion, some senators are wondering out loud: "What's the point?"

"This is unfortunately about politics on Monday night, not about finding a solution that will work for our country," said Republican Bob Corker of Tennessee.

"If there was ever a moment for all of us to reflect and reaffirm our most basic beliefs that everybody counts and everybody has dignity, now's the time," President Obama said in remarks during a visit to Orlando, Fla., to express his support for the victims of Sunday's deadly attack and their families.

As NPR's Scott Horsley tells our Newscast unit, "The president hopes his presence in Orlando will provide some support to the families of the 49 people who died in Sunday's massacre, as well as the dozens of people who are still recovering from the wounds they suffered."

Asher Rohen is organizing a march in response to the Orlando attack
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with Asher Rohen about a march he's organizing in response to the Orlando attack. Rohen lost a friend in the attack and he wants to take action with a political march, scheduled for June 18, 2016, that stands separate from the joy of the Pride parade. 

The rainbow pride flag was raised over the Washington state Capitol Wednesday. It was then immediately lowered to half-staff in honor of the victims of last weekend’s mass shooting in Orlando.

Dan Savage and husband Terry Miller are seen in a 2011 photo.
Flickr photo/Chris Tse (CC BY-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/a69LS4

Bill Radke talks with The Stranger's Dan Savage about why gay clubs and bars haven't faded into the past for the LGBTQ community.

Flickr photo, 2008.
Flickr Photo/Patrick S (CC BY-NC 2.0) http://bit.ly/1UIR7nD

 Bill Radke talks with senior editor Jim Gates about a surprising occurrence during his morning commute: a bus rider burst into song on a packed C-Line bus to help process grief over the Orlando shooting.

How do you process grief when tragedies happen? Call our feedback line at 206.221.3663, or email record@kuow.org with your stories and thoughts. 

Dennis Coleman, artistic director of the Seattle Men's Chorus and Seattle Women's Chorus.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Marcie Sillman talks with Dennis Coleman, artistic director of the Seattle Men's Chorus and Seattle Women's Chorus, about the mass shooting in Orlando. Coleman is retiring this year and he talks about how the Orlando shooting is reflected in the music of his final shows at the podium on June 24 and 25.

His name is Eddie Meltzer and he's 34 years old, though according to NPR's Ari Shapiro, he looks about 10 years younger. But it's his humanitarian act to assist many families of the victims of the Orlando shooting massacre that brought him to Shapiro's attention.

Updated 2:30 a.m. ET Thursday:

Nearly 15 hours: The Associated Press reports that's how long Connecticut Sen. Chris Murphy and his Democratic colleagues held the floor before yielding early Thursday, with a pledge that he would aggressively press for a legislative response to the Orlando, Fla., mass shooting. Murphy has been upset with congressional inaction on gun violence.

Original Post:

Senate Democrats say they are bringing Senate business to a halt in an effort to force some action on gun control.

Bill Radke speaks with Shaun Knittel, spokesman for Seattle gay nightclub Neighbours, about how he along with 750 other people narrowly escaped a tragic fate on New Year's Eve, 2013. 

Russian police detains gay couple for Orlando tribute

Jun 14, 2016

The world openly holds vigils for the Orlando shooting victims. In Moscow, you get arrested.

That's what happened yesterday to Islam Abdullabeckov and his boyfriend, Felix Glyukman.

They tried to leave flowers and a sign in front of the US Embassy in Moscow to commemorate the victims. Abdullabeckov and Glyukman were arrested and escorted away.

A victim and his doctors described a "war zone" following the deadliest mass public shooting in modern United States history.

Dr. Chadwick Smith, a surgeon at the Orlando Regional Medical Center in Orlando, Fla.,, said that a little after 2 a.m. ET on Sunday, patients began arriving into the emergency room. It was quickly filled to capacity with people suffering with wounds to the extremities, the chest, the pelvis and the abdomen. Some had small wounds others had large-caliber wounds.

Omar Mateen, who authorities say killed 49 people at the gay nightclub Pulse in Orlando, Fla., was reportedly no stranger to the club.

Multiple media outlets are reporting that some Pulse regulars recognized Mateen, saying that he had spent time at the nightclub before the shooting early Sunday. Witnesses have said the same to authorities, NPR's Dina Temple-Raston reports, citing U.S. officials with knowledge of the investigation.

Meanwhile, at least two men have told the media they interacted with Mateen on gay dating apps. Investigators have not commented on the claims.

R
Adrees Latif/Reuters

Many of the victims of the Sunday shooting in Orlando were in their 20s and Latino. It's a young age, and a really important time for people who are "coming out" to their families.

"Imagine those folks who were not out to their families, or who were barely starting to come out to their families," says Jorge Gutierrez, national coordinator for Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement. "We know how important family is to us as Latinos. Now they don't have that opportunity to be authentic, in their homes with their own families."

Middle school students at the Muslim Association of Puget Sound attend a press conference concerning a recent threat following the Orlando shooting.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

A mosque in Redmond, Washington has added extra security patrols due to a recent threat.  It came just hours after the Orlando shooting.

Redmond police say they received an anonymous call Sunday night. The individual was not making the threat, but passing on information he had overheard.

Editor's note, June 16: An earlier version of this story said Omar Mateen carried an AR-15, based on comments from Orlando Police Chief John Mina, who said Sunday that the gun was an "AR-15-assault-type rifle." Law enforcement officials subsequently told NPR that the gun was a Sig Sauer MCX, a rifle similar to an AR-15 but also different in fundamental ways. This story reflects the change.

When we tried to put the killing of 49 people at an Orlando nightclub on Sunday morning in context, we said and wrote that it was the "deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history."

It was a deadlier attack than the shooting at Virginia Tech, which left 33 people dead, including the shooter.

Aishah Jilani, left, wrote the hashtag #notinmyname in Arabic during a vigil at Cal Anderson Park for the victims of the Orlando shooting.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Emily Fox talks with Seattle Mayor Ed Murray about the mass shooting in Orlando and how Seattle is stepping up safety efforts for the Pride Parade later this month.

My wife's the reason anything gets done

She nudges me towards promise, by degrees

She is the perfect symphony of one

Our son is her most beautiful reprise

We chase the melodies that seem to find us

Until they're finished songs, and start to play

When senseless acts of tragedy remind us

That nothing here is promised, not one day

This show is proof that history remembers

Ricquel Sears of Capitol Hill with her 3-month-old daughter. For Sears, the Orlando shooting hit home. Her brother is gay, and her fiance is Muslim.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

At a vigil Sunday night, Seattleites shared their thoughts about the Orlando shooting that occurred earlier that morning. Ricquel Sears of Capitol Hill, who was at the park with her two children, said her heart dropped:

"My brother is homosexual. It sucks that you would kill someone just because of that. Not only one or two people, but you tried to kill over 100 people.


At blood banks in Orlando, Fla., lines stretched around the block as people waited, in some cases for hours, to donate blood in support of those wounded in a deadly attack at a local gay nightclub.

But, as some people noted with frustration and anger, FDA restrictions currently bar sexually active gay and bisexual men from donating blood, leaving many members of the LGBT community unable to contribute.

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