Olympia

Fear that someone might be watching her has kept Morshida Islam out of her garden, where she spends her evenings.
Flickr Photo/Shereen M (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) http://bit.ly/2c2ZxqY

They first called when I was at my son’s open house, and they left me a message.

Hello, Morshida ... On behalf of the Donald Trump Association, I was just calling to see if I can get your support in getting all the foreigners out of the country. And f**k ‘em. F**k the Islamic community too. Nothing to do with your last name – get out of here though. Seriously.

The Washington state Capitol in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/amishrobot (CC-BY-NC-ND)

A group of citizens in Olympia want the city to be the first in Washington to have an income tax. Their initiative could be on the November ballot.

As the election nears, leaders in Olympia’s city hall are fighting the measure.

Washington state has a fraught relationship with the idea of an income tax. The state currently does not have one.
Drew Christie

Olympia could become the first city in Washington to charge an income tax.


The Washington state Capitol campus could soon be a no-fly-zone for drones. The agency that oversees the 486-acre campus is considering a strict ban.

  The two, unarmed black men shot by a white Olympia police officer early Thursday morning are expected to survive.

The Washington state Capitol in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/amishrobot (CC-BY-NC-ND)

State lawmakers are supposed to finish up their work for the year by Sunday. But with budget negotiations stalled, Gov. Jay Inslee says it looks like this year's legislative session will again take extra time. Kim Malcolm talks with KUOW's Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins.

The Washington state Capitol in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/amishrobot (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the dysfunction in Olympia and what that means for the state budget.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

UPDATE 12/03/13 10 p.m. PT:

As expected, Democratic Party activists chose state Rep. Jamie Pedersen to replace Ed Murray in the state Senate.

Pedersen was the only candidate in the running. He vowed to work to regain the Democratic majority in the Senate and to find new revenue for essential programs.

Pedersen's move to the Senate put his House seat up for grabs.

Flickr Photo/Flickstorage

Marcie Sillman talks with Everett Herald columnist Jerry Cornfield about a new warning over the financial future of Washington's 100-year-old State Parks system.

Just a few blocks away from Washington’s Capitol campus in Olympia you can find a street culture where young adults and teenagers live by their own rules – sometimes with tragic consequences.

Olympia resident Ben Charles, of Crazy Faith Outreach, has been serving food to the homeless in an Olympia parking lot for nearly three years. Now the city has banned the group, citing public safety concerns.

Ben Charles and the Crazy Faith Outreach group have been  feeding homeless people in a parking lot in Olympia every Thursday evening. But now city official want them to shut it down. Ross Reynolds talks to Tom Hill, Olympia’s building official.

Washington Senate Democrats say the misuse of campaign funds last year may have cost them a key race – and therefore control of the state Senate.

Washington’s Legislative Ethics Board is tackling the issue of how often lawmakers can accept meals from lobbyists. The Board spent nearly two hours behind closed doors Thursday discussing a complaint against several lawmakers who dined out regularly with lobbyists last session.

The complaint was triggered by our investigation with the Associated Press into lawmakers who accept free meals from lobbyists. That’s permitted if legislative business is discussed, but only on an infrequent basis.

There are nearly 900 registered lobbyists in Washington state. These are the paid professionals who try to influence the outcome of the legislative process. But this year, a determined dad proved even outsiders can play the legislative game – with a bit of help.

So how does a Microsoft test manager become a citizen lobbyist? For Jeff Schwartz it all started back in 2007 when his son Jacob was about four months old.

“It was right about December that he started excessively throwing up and vomiting,” Schwartz recalls.

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