Olympia | KUOW News and Information

Olympia

Jessyn Farrell was a state legislator representing northeast Seattle. She was also a candidate for Seattle mayor.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

 


Jessyn Farrell wants to see a profound culture shift in Olympia.

KUOW PHOTO/KARA MCDERMOTT

Seattle's City Council votes to tax the rich, but a court battle looms.

We check in on the race to be Seattle's next mayor with just over two weeks to go before the August 1 primary.

President Trump defends his son Donald Jr. over a recently disclosed 2016 meeting with a Russian lawyer who promised dirt on Hillary Clinton.

And Seattle Repertory Theater says it's working on a new musical that would bring grunge to the theater audience.

Time is running out for Washington lawmakers to pass a capital construction budget. Less than one week remains in the state’s third overtime session of the legislature.

Lesson #1: Don't feel wild animals. Lesson #45: Don't forget to put a card in the camera when you take a photo of your guest panel.
Flickr Photo/Richard Towell (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9TGR8V

Seattle is America's fastest-growing big city, but how does it treat those new arrivals?

President Trump's proposes budget cuts to light rail, university research and the cleanup at Hanford.

Will San Fransisco 49er Colin Kaepernick become a Seattle Seahawk? He reportedly visited the team this week and has Seattle's Socialist Councilmember Kshama Sawant in his corner.

And you wouldn't feed a lion by hand, so why do we act any differently when that lion lives in the sea? 

Having a phone in your hand while driving could cost you $136 under the new law.
Flickr Photo/Intel Free Press

Jeannie Yandel talks to Austin Jenkins, KUOW's Olympia correspondent, about the distracted driving bill that lawmakers have been working on this session and how it would change the current law. 

The Washington state Capitol in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/amishrobot (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/4PxvK4

There's a new sanctuary city in Washington.

Olympia's City Council passed a resolution Tuesday to make it a sanctuary for immigrants. The city will not ask people about their immigration status and won't give the federal government information on residents' legal status.

Fear that someone might be watching her has kept Morshida Islam out of her garden, where she spends her evenings.
Flickr Photo/Shereen M (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) http://bit.ly/2c2ZxqY

They first called when I was at my son’s open house, and they left me a message.

Hello, Morshida ... On behalf of the Donald Trump Association, I was just calling to see if I can get your support in getting all the foreigners out of the country. And f**k ‘em. F**k the Islamic community too. Nothing to do with your last name – get out of here though. Seriously.

The Washington state Capitol in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/amishrobot (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/4PxvK4

A group of citizens in Olympia want the city to be the first in Washington to have an income tax. Their initiative could be on the November ballot.

As the election nears, leaders in Olympia’s city hall are fighting the measure.

Washington state has a fraught relationship with the idea of an income tax. The state currently does not have one.
Drew Christie

Olympia could become the first city in Washington to charge an income tax.


The Washington state Capitol campus could soon be a no-fly-zone for drones. The agency that oversees the 486-acre campus is considering a strict ban.

  The two, unarmed black men shot by a white Olympia police officer early Thursday morning are expected to survive.

The Washington state Capitol in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/amishrobot (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/4PxvK4

State lawmakers are supposed to finish up their work for the year by Sunday. But with budget negotiations stalled, Gov. Jay Inslee says it looks like this year's legislative session will again take extra time. Kim Malcolm talks with KUOW's Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins.

The Washington state Capitol in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/amishrobot (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/4PxvK4

Marcie Sillman talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the dysfunction in Olympia and what that means for the state budget.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

UPDATE 12/03/13 10 p.m. PT:

As expected, Democratic Party activists chose state Rep. Jamie Pedersen to replace Ed Murray in the state Senate.

Pedersen was the only candidate in the running. He vowed to work to regain the Democratic majority in the Senate and to find new revenue for essential programs.

Pedersen's move to the Senate put his House seat up for grabs.

Flickr Photo/Flickstorage

Marcie Sillman talks with Everett Herald columnist Jerry Cornfield about a new warning over the financial future of Washington's 100-year-old State Parks system.

Just a few blocks away from Washington’s Capitol campus in Olympia you can find a street culture where young adults and teenagers live by their own rules – sometimes with tragic consequences.

Olympia resident Ben Charles, of Crazy Faith Outreach, has been serving food to the homeless in an Olympia parking lot for nearly three years. Now the city has banned the group, citing public safety concerns.

Ben Charles and the Crazy Faith Outreach group have been  feeding homeless people in a parking lot in Olympia every Thursday evening. But now city official want them to shut it down. Ross Reynolds talks to Tom Hill, Olympia’s building official.

Washington Senate Democrats say the misuse of campaign funds last year may have cost them a key race – and therefore control of the state Senate.

Washington’s Legislative Ethics Board is tackling the issue of how often lawmakers can accept meals from lobbyists. The Board spent nearly two hours behind closed doors Thursday discussing a complaint against several lawmakers who dined out regularly with lobbyists last session.

The complaint was triggered by our investigation with the Associated Press into lawmakers who accept free meals from lobbyists. That’s permitted if legislative business is discussed, but only on an infrequent basis.

There are nearly 900 registered lobbyists in Washington state. These are the paid professionals who try to influence the outcome of the legislative process. But this year, a determined dad proved even outsiders can play the legislative game – with a bit of help.

So how does a Microsoft test manager become a citizen lobbyist? For Jeff Schwartz it all started back in 2007 when his son Jacob was about four months old.

“It was right about December that he started excessively throwing up and vomiting,” Schwartz recalls.

Flickr Photo/jseattle

Former Washington State Republican Party Chairman Kirby Wilbur surprised many of his colleagues when he resigned close to a month ago. Wilbur went to work for Young America’s Foundation, a conservative organization with a mission to train young people for jobs in the media.

Flickr Photo/Mark Atwood

  

Olympia And The Transportation Package
When state lawmakers adjourned in June, they left a $10 billion transportation package on the table. Now, senate leaders have announced they’ll hold hearings in the fall on the state’s transportation priorities and how to pay for them. Everett Herald reporter and columnist Jerry Cornfield joins us with details.
 

Letters Written In Wartime
Wartime letters capture a uniquely vivid history not found in text books. They place us in the author’s shoes. Take this quote from a letter written in 1941: “A man just brought us our gas masks. I don’t know why I’m writing this, because if we’re hit with a bomb they won’t find enough of me — let alone this letter. I imagine it’s to show myself that I can be calm under fire.”  We experience history by reading the letters of those who lived it.


Greendays Gardening Panel
Our gardening panel includes a flower expert, native plant expert and vegetable gardening expert.  They’re on hand to answer your gardening questions. 

Fickr Photo/Julian Bleecker

State Lawmakers Move On Transportation Package
When state lawmakers adjourned in June, they left a $10 billion transportation package on the table. Now, Senate leaders have announced they’ll hold public hearings in the fall on the state’s transportation priorities and how to pay for them. Everett Herald reporter and columnist Jerry Cornfield joins us with details.

Junk Foods We Have Loved
Admit it – as healthy as we may try to be, we all have our guilty pleasures when it comes to food. Food writers and co-hosts of the Spilled Milk podcast, Molly Wizenberg and Matthew Amster-Burton, join us to talk favorite junk foods and fess up to their cravings. What are yours? Call us at 206.543.5869 or write weekday@kuow.org.

Future Of Wash. State GOP After Kirby Wilbur

Jul 30, 2013
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Kirby Wilbur, the head of the Washington state GOP, resigned on Monday and has left the party struggling to find a new leader. As chair he led the Republicans to take greater control of the state Legislature but lost key races for governor and attorney general.

Christopher Parker's book "Change They Can't Believe In."

  This (Last) Week In Olympia 
The 2013 Washington state legislative session draws to a close. Everett Herald reporter and columnist Jerry Cornfield gives us a roundup of what lawmakers did – and did not – achieve in Olympia.

Working In Television: Frank Buxton Did It All
Frank Buxton spent much of his career working in television as an actor, director, writer and producer before moving to Bainbridge Island. He hosted a game show, wrote for “The Odd Couple” and appeared in countless TV commercials. He talks with Katy Sewall about what it was like to work with Woody Allen and travel the world for ABC.

“Change They Can’t Believe In”
The Tea Party has risen in politics over the past few years, bringing conservatism on social issues and economic policy to Washington, DC. They've impacted local and national politics, so what’s their message that’s bringing people together? University of Washington professor Christopher Parker joins us to talk about his new book examining what motivates the Tea Party.

Conversation News Quiz

Jun 28, 2013

  Once again, it is the ever popular The Conversation news quiz — where one lucky listener gets the chance to demonstrate his or her news knowledge of what we talked about this week on the show. Our winner gets to wear The Conversation Crown for a week on our Facebook page.

Flickr Photo/Noelle Noble

Budget Deal In Olympia
Everett Herald columnist and Weekday’s regular Olympia guru Jerry Cornfield brings us analysis of the tentative budget deal reached by state lawmakers.
 
Immigration Deal In DC
Yesterday's immigration reform vote is being hailed as a rare example of bipartisanship. The Senate voted 68 to 32 yesterday to overhaul the nation’s immigration system. It now heads to the House. We talk with Jill Jackson of CBS News from Washington, DC.

Rethinking How We Study Cancer
A scientist at Johns Hopkins University developed a mathematical model to better understand why some cancer tumors are resistant to cancer fighting drugs. Science reporter Carl Zimmer explains the study and how scientists are changing the way they think about cancer.

Pet Questions Answered
Got a difficult dog or cat? Pet trainer, Steve Duno, tackles your questions at 206.543.5869 (KUOW).  Also, is neutering dogs always a good idea?  

What Do Lobbyists Expect When They Take Washington State Lawmakers To Dinner?

May 31, 2013
Flickr Photo/Robyn Lee

Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins joins Ross Reynolds with a special report on state lobbying efforts.  Plus, Austin and Ross discuss the late Republican Washington State Senator Mike Carrell of Lakewood.   

Courtesy Kate Hess

This Week In Olympia
State lawmakers begin week three of the special legislative session today. Everett Herald reporter Jerry Cornfield joins us with a look at what to expect.

Comic Actress Kate Hess Parodies Masterpiece Theater
Everyone loves “Downton Abbey” these days and Hollywood is paying attention by hiring British actors for American roles. Are American actors hired in Britain?  Not really. Katy Sewall talks with writer and actress Kate Hess about the British invasion in her costume-drama parody, “Murder Abbey.”

How Should Doctors Navigate The Various Beliefs Of Dying Patients?
Doctors treat a wide variety of patients. How well versed in world cultures and religion should doctors be?  And how do encounters with dying patients change doctors' views of death? Katy Sewall talks with retired pulmonary/critical care doctor Jim deMaine.

The Weather And Hike Of The Week
Michael Fagin suggests a hike that matches the week’s weather forecast.

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