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obituary

Jeannie Yandel talks to Mike Regis, director of procurement at Northwest Harvest, about his friend and former colleague Ruth Velozo.

Velozo was one of the founders of Northwest Harvest and served as their executive director for 21 years. 

Oliver Sacks, the famed neurologist and best-selling author of books such as The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, died of cancer today in New York City at the age of 82, a longtime friend and colleague has confirmed.

The London-born academic's 1973 memoir Awakenings, about his efforts to use the drug L-Dopa to bring patients who survived the 1917-1928 encephalitis epidemic out of their persistent catatonic state, was turned into a 1990 Hollywood film starring Robin Williams and Robert De Niro. He was the author of a dozen other books.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Patrice Demombynes, a long-time friend of artist Rolon Bert Garner and the owner of the Virginia Inn. Garner died on  Aug. 17. He had a big impact on the Seattle art scene during his life. 

Former NAACP chairman Julian Bond takes part in the "Heroes of the Civil Rights Movement" panel during the Civil Rights Summit on Wednesday, April 9, 2014, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Jack Plunkett)
AP Photo/Jack Plunkett

Julian Bond, a leading civil rights activist and anti-war campaigner who helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and later served as chairman of the NAACP, has died at age 75.

In 2008, Bond spoke with Steve Scher, then host of the KUOW program Weekday. He told Scher that nonviolence was an “overwhelmingly effective weapon.”

Ivan Doig, the award-winning writer, most often wrote about his home state of Montana. He was 75 when he died on Thursday.
University of Washington Photo/Anil Kapahi

Award winning writer Ivan Doig died Thursday at his Seattle home. He was 75.

Doig was one of the most respected writers of the American West and often wrote about his native state of Montana.

He wrote 16 books, including the so-called McCaskill trilogy, three novels about a fictional Montana family covering the first 100 years of state history.

Moodette Ka'apana in a photograph taken at her 60th birthday celebration.
Courtesy of KaLehua Ka'apana

To people who knew Moodette Ka’apana, she was Aunty Moody.

“There’s a saying in the Hawaii community: ‘Huiiii, Aunty! How you?’” said Stephen Gomes, a friend.

“Everybody knew Aunty,” Gomes said, “they knew Aunty Moody.”

I had what the guys would call the dubious distinction of putting Tom on NPR's air. For 10 years they'd had a weekly program on WBUR in Boston. In 1987, when we were launching Weekend Edition Sunday, we asked stations for tapes of local programs that might work nationally. WBUR sent cassettes of Tom and Ray, and their five-minute spots became the hit of Sunday mornings.

Tom Magliozzi, one of public radio's most popular personalities, died on Monday of complications from Alzheimer's disease. He was 77 years old.

Tom and his brother, Ray, became famous as "Click and Clack the Tappet Brothers" on the weekly NPR show Car Talk. They bantered, told jokes, laughed and sometimes even gave pretty good advice to listeners who called in with their car troubles.

If there was one thing that defined Tom Magliozzi, it was his laugh. It was loud, it was constant, it was infectious.

Benjamin Crowninshield Bradlee, who led The Washington Post to national eminence through charm, drive, instinct and, most notably, an epic confrontation with the Nixon White House, died Tuesday. He was 93.

For many years, Robin Williams seemed like a talent who had no off switch.

From his standup comedy work to TV roles to talk show appearances to Oscar-caliber movies and performances on Broadway, Williams was a dervish of comedy — tossing off one-liners, biting asides and sidesplitting routines in a blizzard of accents, attitudes and goodhearted energy.

Ross Reynolds talks with Seattle Chamber of Commerce Acting CEO Maud Daudon about former Seattle Mayor Paul Schell. Daudon served as deputy mayor and chief of staff under Schell from 1998 to 2001. In addition, Ross discusses Schell’s legacy with David Brewster, founder of the Seattle Weekly, who was a personal friend. Schell died Sunday at the age of 76.

Margot Adler, one of the signature voices on NPR's airwaves for more than three decades, died Monday at her home in New York City. She was 68 and had been battling cancer.

Margot joined the NPR staff as a general assignment reporter in 1979. She went on to cover everything from the beginnings of the AIDS epidemic to confrontations involving the Ku Klux Klan in Greensboro, N.C., to the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives

He is the reason fish fly at the Pike Place Market, or so the story goes.

On Sunday, Paul Schell, a former Seattle mayor and champion of urban neighborhoods, died. He was 76.

A spokeswoman for Mayor Ed Murray confirmed that Schell died at Swedish Hospital.

KUOW Photo/Sage Van Wing

Local photographer Jini Dellaccio died last week. She was 97.

Jini was best known for her images of the Pacific Northwest music scene in the 1960s. But Jini came to photography later in life. She was a musician first, a homemaker and a painter. She didn't even pick up a camera until she was in her 40s.

Paul Morigi/AP Images for National Portrait Gallery

Marcie Sillman talks to Colleen McElroy and Jen Marlowe about the legacy and impact of Dr. Maya Angelou on their lives.

McElroy is a writer and lecturer emeritus at the University of Washington. Marlowe is a Seattle writer and activist.

Poet, performer and political activist Maya Angelou has died after a long illness at her home in Winston-Salem, N.C. She was 86. Born in St. Louis in 1928, Angelou grew up in a segregated society that she worked to change during the civil rights era. Angelou, who refused to speak for much of her childhood, revealed the scars of her past in I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, the first of a series of memoirs.

Credit Seattle Rep Theatre

Jerry Manning, the artistic leader of Seattle Repertory Theatre, died suddenly on Wednesday following complications from a routine surgery in March, according to a news release from the theater. He was 58.

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America's best-known writer.

His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.

A Writer Shaped By His Beginnings

Courtesy of Outdoor Research

Last Friday, mountaineer legend Chad Kellogg was killed climbing Mount Fitz Roy in Argentina.

His death has been a blow to the local climbing community.

YouTube Photo/Patricia O'Brien & Gabriel Miller

In 1985, KUOW’s Marcia Alvar interviewed Norman Durkee, the longtime music director of Teatro Zinzanni, the over-the-top musical theater production held in a tent on lower Queen Anne. Durkee died on Sunday at the age of 65.

Durkee, a soft-spoken man with a long white beard, had a long career in jazz, classical and rock music, including playing the piano part on Bachman Turner Overdrive’s song, “Takin’ Care of Business.” He also did a stint making ads in Los Angeles, where his creative impulses didn’t always meet the approval of the businesses that hired him.

Courtesy of the Booker family.

William Booker, a bomber with the Tuskegee Airmen, never complained.

He didn't complain about being pushed from town to town – from Texas to Florida, to Michigan, to Indiana and to Kentucky – because whites didn’t want black troops stationed near their homes. Nor did he complain about being segregated from other fighter squadrons.

Nelson Mandela, South Africa's 'Greatest Son,' Dies At 95

Dec 6, 2013
AP Photo

Nelson Mandela, South Africa's first black president and anti-apartheid icon has died, according to South Africa President Jacob Zuma. He was 95.

One of rock's most beloved and contrarian figures has died. Lou Reed epitomized New York City's artistic underbelly in the 1970s, with his songs about hookers and junkies. He was 71.

The Seattle classical music community lost one of its most respected leaders Thursday. Toby Saks was a cellist, music professor at the University of Washington and the founder of the Seattle Chamber Music Society. Her death at age 71 from pancreatic cancer came just after the completion of the annual summer festival that she has overseen for more than 30 years.

The Legacy Of Kip Tokuda

Jul 16, 2013

  Former State Legislator Kip Tokuda passed away this weekend. The South Seattle Democrat served four terms in the House of Representatives. He was a champion for Asian-American rights, co-founding the Asian Pacific Islander Community Leadership Foundation to encourage young people for leadership roles in politics and nonprofit organizations. Ross Reynolds discusses his legacy with Jill NiShii, a longtime friend and former mentee of Tokuda.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

A prominent leader in Seattle's Asian-American community has died.

Kip Tokuda passed away suddenly, according to a statement from his family. He was 66 years old.

Mary Levin / UW Photography

Seattle pioneer descendant Brewster Denny passed away this past Saturday from natural causes. He was 88 years old.  Denny spent much of his life as a champion of local history, and for many, he was a living embodiment of Seattle’s pioneer era.

Cheryl Chow, Educator And Politician Dies At 66

Mar 29, 2013
The Seattle Channel

Cheryl Chow died Friday. Chow served on the Seattle City Council and the Seattle School Board. She grew up in Seattle and had also worked as a teacher, a principal and an assistant director for Girl Scouts of Western Washington.

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Booth Gardner, Washington’s 19th governor, has died at age 76. Gardner’s family says he passed away Friday night from complications of Parkinson's disease. Gardner had lived with the illness for more than a decade.

Democrat Booth Gardner took office in January of 1985. He was a Harvard-educated businessman with a playful manner. Longtime newspaper columnist Joel Connelly offers these snapshot memories.

Courtesy University of Washington

Alden Mason was a Pacific Northwest native and a lifelong resident, but his artistic influence reaches far beyond this corner of the country. Mason was born in Everett, Wash., in 1919, and he grew up enamored with the outdoor world around him. 

He planned to study entomology when he enrolled in the University of Washington.  By chance, he told an interviewer, he wandered over to the art building, where a nude model was posing for painting students.  Mason was only half-joking when he says that encounter changed his career path.

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