obesity

More than one-third of Americans are obese, and one recent study showed that obese drivers are more likely to die in a car crash. So the world's largest maker of dummies is making one that is obese.

KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Ross Reynolds speaks with Dr. James Levine about his book, "Get Up! Why Your Chair is Killing You and What You Can Do About It." Dr. Levine treats obesity at the Mayo Clinic and he’s the inventor of the treadmill desk.

New figures on weight show Idaho stands out among Western states -- but not in the way public health officials would like. 

If there's a single invention that helped shape New York City, literally, it might be the elevator. Along with steel frame construction, the elevator allowed New York City to grow up.

But according to architect David Burney, former New York City commissioner of the Department of Design and Construction, it's time to celebrate the steps.

We're constantly hearing messages that we're eating too much and not moving around enough. Now researchers suggest that we're actually not eating more than we did 20 years ago, it's that we're much less active. And that includes not just middle-aged workers tied to their desks, but also young men and women who spend their days sitting in front of their laptops.

Is Obesity A Disease?

Jul 7, 2014

Last year the American Medical Association voted to recognize obesity as a disease. In a June 18, 2013, press release, AMA board member Dr. Patrice Harris explained:

"Recognizing obesity as a disease will help change the way the medical community tackles this complex issue that affects approximately one in three Americans."

Transcript

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It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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Dr. Deborah Cohen's book, “A Big Fat Crisis."

Ross Reynolds talks with Dr. Deborah Cohen about her new book, “A Big Fat Crisis: The Hidden Forces Behind The Obesity Epidemic – And How We Can End It."

She says there are two reasons for the obesity epidemic. First, we’re hardwired to eat and no matter how many diets we try, we can’t overcome the limits of self control. Second, in the modern food environment, corporations aggressively market cheap, unhealthy food.

Flickr Photo/Kevin Krejci

Even if you haven’t been exposed to DDT in your lifetime, researchers say it could still have an effect on you – and your weight.

For years, researchers have been connecting the dots between socioeconomic status and obesity rates. A new study from the University of Washington makes those connections even stronger.

The study, published in the International Journal of Obesity looked at nearly 60,000 men and women in King County. It found that people in South and Southeast King County were much more likely to be obese. The biggest factors were education levels and home values.

Adam Drewnowski is the study’s lead author. He’s a professor of epidemiology at the University of Washington and the director of the UW’s Center for Public Health Nutrition. He talks with Marcie Sillman.

KUOW Photo/Amina Al-Sadi

 


Childhood Obesity Declining Among America’s Poorest
Since the mid 1970’s, childhood obesity rates in America have doubled. In recent years however, the tide seems to be turning. Between 2008 and 2011, obesity rates among poor children fell in 18 states – including here in Washington according to a new study from the Centers For Disease Control. Why do poor children suffer from high obesity rates? And what are some of the factors that are helping close the gap? We talk with Simone French of the University of Minnesota’s Obesity Prevention Center.

Thoughts On Ramadan
Muslims around the world have been fasting during the day and attending religious gatherings at night during the annual celebration of Ramadan, Islam’s holiest of holidays. Weekday producer Amina Al-Sadi reflects on this year’s Ramadan as it draws to a close.

Radio Retrospective
Katy Sewall takes a weekly listen back to the sounds of radio’s Golden Age.

Recommended Eating
Food writer Sara Dickerman joins us with a lunch recommendation. Today she highlights “Phnom Penh,” a Cambodian restaurant in Seattle’s International District. Prefer to cook for yourself? She also recommends a cookbook.

Do You Want The Government All Up In Your Junk Food?

Mar 26, 2013

Over 60 percent of Americans are overweight or obese. Most of us can agree that’s high. But we don’t agree how to fix it, nor can we agree on who is responsible for the problem. Is it time for the government to step in and step up food regulation in the United States? Ross Reynolds and Dr. William Hallman discuss the challenges facing out food system when it comes to advertising, warning labels and regulation.

How Healthy Is Seattle?

Mar 8, 2013
Gallup-Healthways, 2012

What is well-being? How do you measure it? And how do Seattle and Washington state measure up in terms of healthy behaviors and happy outlook?

Ross Reynolds talked to Dr. Carter Coberley, vice president of Health Research and Outcomes at Healthways Center in Franklin, Tennessee, about a social-measurement index that goes beyond the gross domestic product or the Dow Jones Industrial average.

Ruby de Luna

Most science exhibits focus on animals, robots or body parts. But a new exhibit at Seattle’s Pacific Science Center focuses on wellness. The goal is to help kids understand how the choices they make affect their overall health.