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This Not Just In

Photo by Frank Shaw, and used with permission by Paul Dorpat.

In 1965, a local businessman towed a giant orca into Elliott Bay. Namu the Killer Whale became a huge hit with the public, inspiring local musicians and even a movie.

1962: Remembering The Deadly Columbus Day Storm

Oct 12, 2015
Columbus Day Storm damage at 30th Avenue and East Spruce Street. The photo was taken Oct. 15, 1962, three days after the storm struck.
Seattle Municipal Archives

A lot of strange things happened in October 1962.

In Hollywood, Bobby "Boris" Pickett topped the charts with “Monster Mash.” In New York, James Brown recorded his incredible "Live at the Apollo" album. And in Cuba, offensive missile sites were being built, marking the start of the Cuban missile crisis.

Closer to home, the Pacific Northwest was about to face one of the most destructive natural disasters in American history.

Seattle Post-Intelligencer Collection, Museum of History & Industry, Seattle; All Rights Reserved

As World War II came to a dramatic end 70 years ago on Aug. 14, the role that the Northwest played in the conflict was fully revealed in the aftermath of the atomic bombing in Japan.

President Harry S. Truman goes for a car ride during a Puget Sound fishing trip. From left to right, Truman, Sen. Warren G. Magnuson, Gov. Monrad C. Wallgren, and Maj. Gen. Harry H. Vaughan.
Harry S. Truman Library & Museum

World War II was still boiling toward its end when President Harry S Truman left the nation’s capital, headed out West in one of history’s most momentous months.

His mission in June 1945? A little rest and relaxation among political allies and Puget Sound scenery in Washington.

Courtesy Boeing

There is an old saying in the Pacific Northwest about the state’s largest private employer: “When Boeing sneezes, Seattle catches cold.” 

The Puget Sound region has had its fair share of sniffles over the years, but 14 years ago Boeing made a decision that was one of the most dramatic in the company’s entire history.

Rain And Wind Bring Back Memories Of Hanukkah Storm

Dec 11, 2014
US Naval Research Laboratory

It was eight years ago this weekend that a massive storm brought deadly rain and wind to the Pacific Northwest, disrupting the holidays and leaving tens of thousands in the dark and cold.

On Thursday, December 14, 2006, the busy holiday season was in full swing.  Christmas Eve was 10 days away, and it was the night before Hanukkah.  In SODO, the Seahawks were hosting the San Francisco 49ers in a late season match-up.

Remember Washington's 2004 Election Soap Opera?

Nov 4, 2014
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

If you can’t remember the details of the 2004 Washington state governor’s race, you shouldn’t feel bad. It was pretty complicated and had more twists and turns than a soap opera.

Celebrating Bobo, Seattle’s Most Famous Primate

Jul 18, 2014
Flickr Photo/Jesse Means (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Mid-July in Seattle means Seafair events, the actual arrival of summer and – if you lived here in the 1950s and '60s – it meant the annual birthday celebration for the city’s most famous primate, Bobo the gorilla.

Mixed Reaction To Lincoln's Death On West Coast

Apr 14, 2014
Wikipedia/Alexander Gardner

On that Saturday afternoon, April 15, 1865, the news reached Seattle by telegraph. President Abraham Lincoln was shot dead by an assassin at Ford’s Theatre on Good Friday evening.

U.S. Geological Survey Photographic Library

Fifty years ago, a large earthquake centered near Anchorage, Alaska, set off a fatal chain of destruction that reached through Washington and all the way down into California.

March 27, 1964 – Good Friday – was a typical early spring day in Seattle. But just after 7:30 p.m., an earthquake disrupted the peaceful evening all along the Pacific coast.

Photo courtesy Washington State Department of Transportation

The Lacey V. Murrow Memorial Bridge that connected Seattle to Mercer Island sank to the bottom of Lake Washington 23 years ago this weekend.

Dave Niehaus was the “Voice of the Seattle Mariners.” His sudden and unexpected death on Nov. 10, 2010 from a heart attack was more than just a sports story. The news hit people hard. Niehaus was part of the cultural fabric of the Pacific Northwest, a role he played since the time he called the first pitch at the first Mariners game back in 1977.

Husky Stadium Has Long History Beyond Football

Aug 30, 2013
javacolleen / Flickr

Early September means college football. And down along Montlake Boulevard, the University of Washington Huskies are getting ready to play in their remodeled and expanded stadium. Though most of the structure is new, there’s been a stadium on this same spot since 1920. And in nearly a century, it’s played host to a lot more than football games.

SR 520 Floating Bridge Celebrates 50 Years

Aug 27, 2013
Flickr Photo/WSDOT

August 28, 1963 was a momentous day in American history, and it was also a pretty big day in Seattle. At the same time that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was giving his landmark “I Have A Dream” speech at the Lincoln Memorial, then-Washington governor Albert Rosellini was also addressing a crowd. But Rosellini was in the middle of Lake Washington, on a brand-new floating bridge that would eventually be known as State Route 520.

copyright © Timothy Eagan

The first wave of the British Invasion hit the shores of the Pacific Northwest with the arrival of The Beatles on August 21, 1964.

AP Photo

In the summer of 1982, Kirkland, Wash., was a quiet bedroom community. That was, until the local underdog Little League team made it to the World Championship game and became a part of sports history.

Wikipedia

On July 27, 1923, Warren G. Harding spoke at Husky Stadium. It would be the last public speech the president would ever give.

Dream About To Take Flight For Seattle Couple

Jun 28, 2013
Courtesy of Bob and Diane Dempster

In 1924, Seattle’s Sand Point was the site of one of the greatest aviation milestones of all time. But the event was eclipsed by other aviators like Charles Lindbergh and the Wright Brothers. Now, a Seattle couple wants to breathe new life into that momentous time with their own pioneering project.

Mary Levin / UW Photography

Seattle pioneer descendant Brewster Denny passed away this past Saturday from natural causes. He was 88 years old.  Denny spent much of his life as a champion of local history, and for many, he was a living embodiment of Seattle’s pioneer era.

Remembering The SuperSonics World Championship

May 31, 2013
Seattle Municipal Archives.

So far, attempts to bring the SuperSonics back to Seattle have fallen short. Fans might be a little down, but 34 years ago the Sonics really gave us something to cheer about.

Courtesy MOHAI/Seattle Post-Intelligencer Collection

The Boeing Dreamliner was been grounded since Jan. 16 as authorities try to sort out problems with the plane’s high tech batteries and electrical system. Meanwhile, it was 70 years ago this coming week that an earlier Boeing plane caught fire over Seattle during a test flight, causing one of the worst air disasters in the city’s history.

This NOT Just In: The Last Episode Of J.P. Patches

Dec 28, 2012
J.P. Patches and Gertrude from The J.P. Patches Show.
Courtesy of Chris Wedes

Chris Wedes passed away earlier this year after a long battle with cancer.  Wedes was the host of the long-running JP Patches Show on KIRO TV and one of the region's most beloved figures.  "This NOT Just In" looks back to the final weekday episode of the popular program, back in December 1978.

How We Mourned John Lennon Before The Internet

Dec 7, 2012
Roy Kerwood / Wikipedia

John Lennon was murdered 30 years ago. We'll look back at how Seattleites mourned the death of the former Beatle in a time before the Internet, social media and cell phones.

D.B. Cooper
Courtesy/Wikipedia

On November 24, 1971, a man who is referred to as D.B. Cooper hijacked a Boeing 727 on a flight between Portland, Oregon and Seattle. He extorted $200,000 in ransom, and parachuted from the plane. A look back at the hijacking which has become legendary in the Pacific Northwest and the rest of America.

Library of Congress Van Vechten Collection

On October 30, 1938, Orson Wells' infamous "War of the Worlds" broadcast across the nation.  Fake news of a Martian landing fooled a lot of people on the East Coast, especially around New Jersey, where phony live reports described the alien landing site. But the most infamous panic of all didn't happen in the East. And it wasn't just a single person. It was an entire town, and it happened right here in Washington state.