No Child Left Behind | KUOW News and Information

No Child Left Behind

President Obama called it "a Christmas miracle. A bipartisan bill signing right here."

The "right here" was the South Court Auditorium, part of the White House complex. More importantly, the bipartisan bill being signed was the Every Student Succeeds Act — a long-overdue replacement of the unpopular federal education law known as No Child Left Behind.

U.S. Senator Patty Murray
Flickr Photo/Senate Democrats (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks to Senator Patty Murray (D-Wash.) about the Every Student Succeeds Act, the first major education bill since No Child Left Behind, and what it means for Washington students. 

The U.S. Senate is expected to vote as soon as Wednesday on replacing the nation's big education law, known since 2001 as No Child Left Behind.

And President Obama is expected to sign the new version, ending an era marked by bitter fights between the federal government, states and schools.

So as it dies, we thought an obituary was in order.

Yup, an obituary. Because the law's critics and defenders all agree on one thing: No Child Left Behind took on a life of its own.

Desk school education
Flickr Photo/alamosbasement (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., about the revised No Child Left Behind bill she crafted with Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn.

Flickr Photo/Christos Tsoumplekas

School districts across Washington are examining how they’ll be affected by the state’s loss of its No Child Left Behind waiver and resulting loss of flexibility over how they spend $38 million in federal funding. That amount represents 20 percent of the federal Title 1 funding for the state's highest-poverty schools.

Flickr Photo/Richelle Antipolo (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Alyson Klein, Education Week reporter, about what Washington losing its No Child Left Behind waiver means for federal education policy.

Flickr Photo/Xavier (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Superintendent of Public Instruction Randy Dorn about Washington state losing its No Child Left Behind waiver and what that means for state public schools.

Washington has become the first state to have its "No Child Left Behind" waiver revoked by the Obama administration. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan notified the state of his decision today, which will restrict Washington's flexibility in spending federal education dollars.

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Ross Reynolds talks with Donna Blankinship, Washington state education reporter for The Associated Press, about lawmakers coming up with a compromise to revise the teacher evaluation system.

Flickr Photo/Kathy Cassidy (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with Tacoma News Tribune columnist Peter Callaghan about Washington's No Child Left Behind waiver and why the state is at risk of losing it.

From Randy Dorn's Facebook page.

David Hyde talks with State Superintendent Randy Dorn about meeting federal teacher evaluation requirements and why Washington might lose their waiver from the No Child Left Behind law.

Flickr Photo/Chris Campbell (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Washington state Superintendent of Public Instruction Randy Dorn is calling on the Legislature to add more than half a billion dollars for K-12 education over the next two years.

Washington state has been given one year to change its teacher evaluation law or risk losing $38 million in federal education funding.

In a letter Wednesday to state Superintendent of Public Instruction Randy Dorn, US Department of Education Assistant Secretary Deborah Delisle said the state was being granted a one-year extension of its conditional waiver from the requirements of the federal law known as No Child Left Behind.