news

Violence In Cairo
8:29 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Egypt Declares National Emergency

A protester comes to the aid of a wounded comrade as security forces clear a sit-in by supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in the eastern Nasr City district of Cairo August 14.
AP Photo/Ahmed Gomaa

Egypt's presidency has declared a state of emergency after scores of people were killed when security forces stormed protest camps in Cairo.

The camps had been occupied by supporters of former president Mohammed Morsi, who was deposed in early July.

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8:21 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Kenneth Bae, American Imprisoned In North Korea, Moved To Hospital

Lead in text: 
Kenneth Bae, an American man from Lynnwood, Wash., has spent more than nine months imprisoned in North Korea. Bae had been telling his family that his health was failing, possibly from diabetes-related complications. Bae is now suffering from severe back and leg pain and has lost more than 50 pounds, his sister Terri Chung told CNN late Sunday.
Seoul, South Korea (CNN) -- Kenneth Bae, the American citizen sentenced to 15 years in a North Korean labor camp, has been moved to a hospital after a serious deterioration in his health, his sister said.
Future of Newspapers
12:40 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Seattle Times Editor Departing For Dean Position

Flickr Photo/European Citizen

In this era of digital media David Boardman, the departing executive editor of the Seattle Times, said he sees a great future ahead for newspapers.

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Law
12:09 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

State Supreme Court Blasts “Institutional Racism” In Jury Selection

Race, racism and fairness are at the heart of a stack of opinions released today by the Washington state Supreme Court. The court issued 110 pages about one murder conviction, even though it was not overturned today. KUOW’s Phyllis Fletcher gives us the lowdown on the latest Supreme Court ruling.

Entrepreneurship
7:57 am
Thu August 1, 2013

'Hackerspaces' Double As Private Incubators For Entrepreneurship

Tom Banse Northwest News Network

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 10:17 am

"Hackerspaces" are popping up all over the Northwest. But these aren't dens of computer infiltrators.

What we're talking about are community workshops for tinkering, machine tooling, 3-D printing and any other hands-on creativity you can think of. Some market themselves under the more benign-sounding label of "maker space." These workshops are now drawing attention as private incubators for entrepreneurship.

But let's straighten out this name business.

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Pot Investment
11:27 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Potreprenuers Get Ready For A New Kind Of Drug Deal

Flickr Photo/Benoit Deniaud

With recreational pot legal in Washington state, the marijuana business is moving from back alleys to storefronts. Former Silicon Valley banker Brendan Kennedy wants to lead the way in the new pot economy. He is CEO of Privateer Holdings, a cannabis-focused venture capital fund. He’ll explain to Ross Reynolds why he sees it as a $50 billion legal business.

Aging Population
11:21 am
Tue July 30, 2013

The Dangers Of Senior Assisted Living

Flickr Photo/ma neeks

Seattle-based Emeritus Senior Living is the country’s largest assisted living operator, housing approximately 37,000 elderly Americans in more than 400 facilities across the country. Frontline and ProPublica teamed up to investigate reports on the failures of Emeritus. The year-long investigation resulted in a series of articles and a documentary on the dangers of senior care. Ross Reynolds hears from A.C. Wilson, a reporter at ProPublica, about the dark side of senior assisted living.

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Republican Chair Resigns
11:07 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Future Of Wash. State GOP After Kirby Wilbur

State Republican chairman Kirby Wilbur stands atop stairs in his home to explain the caucus process on March 3, 2012. Wilbur resigned Monday from his position in order to work for the Young America's Foundation.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Kirby Wilbur, the head of the Washington state GOP, resigned on Monday and has left the party struggling to find a new leader. As chair he led the Republicans to take greater control of the state Legislature but lost key races for governor and attorney general.

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Soldier Award
8:19 am
Tue July 30, 2013

JBLM Solider To Receive Medal Of Honor

Staff Sgt. Ty Carter.
US Army

A solider from Joint Base Lewis-McChord will be awarded the Medal of Honor.

Spokane-born Staff Sgt. Ty Carter of  will be one of only a handful of living American soldiers to receive the nation’s highest military honor. The Army says US troops were far outnumbered that day in 2009 at Combat Outpost Keating in eastern Afghanistan. During the battle the Army says Carter killed enemy troops and risked his own life to save an injured soldier pinned down by a barrage of enemy fire.

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Family Hopes For Release
4:46 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Will Jimmy Carter Help Free Lynnwood Man Held In North Korea?

AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon

Several news outlets reported Monday that former President Jimmy Carter may travel to North Korea to secure the release of Kenneth Bae, who's been imprisoned in North Korea for nine months.

The unconfirmed reports raised hopes for Bae's family members, though they said they had not been informed of any specific plans to seek his release.

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Economy
11:25 am
Thu July 25, 2013

How Will The President's Economic Plan Play In Washington?

President Obama has set off on a short trip with a few speeches discussing the long term needs of our economy, but what would these policies mean in Washington state? Ross Reynolds sits down with Marilyn Watkins, policy director at the Economic Opportunity Institute, and Paul Guppy, vice president for research at the Washington Policy Center, to find out more on what the president's goals mean for the Evergreen State.

Megaload Hurdles
10:23 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Shipper, Forest Service At Standoff Over 'Megaloads'

Bett Haverstick/Friends of the Clearwater. A member of the environmental group Friends of the Clearwater took this photo on July 22 at the Port of Wilma of what appear to be Omega Morgan’s 'megaload' shipments.

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 4:02 pm

An Oregon shipping company and the U.S. Forest Service appear to be at a standoff over whether huge pieces of oil equipment will pass through a scenic stretch of Idaho. These so-called “megaloads” are ultimately headed to the oil sands of Alberta, Canada.

The Forest Service says it can’t authorize shipments that are as wide as two lanes and the length of five semi-trailers to use a protected portion of Highway 12. At least, not without a lengthy review.

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Pot, Boeing And Art
9:00 am
Thu July 25, 2013

DEA Raids Pot Dispensaries, Art Of Our City, Boeing, Losing Art Collections

Seattle Art Museum's collection is privately owned, unlike the city-owned Detroit Institute of Arts. But it begs the question: What would Seattle look like without its cultural icons?
Flickr Photo/Alex Abboud and illustration by Kara McDermott

DEA Raids Puget Sound Pot Dispensaries
Federal drug enforcement agents raided marijuana dispensaries around Puget Sound on Wednesday afternoon. We’ll bring you the latest and speak with Alison Holcomb of the ACLU of Washington.

Art Of Our City: Precious Little
What are the limits of language? Sometimes we speak better when we communicate without traditional words or vocabularies. That’s one of the themes of Madeline George’s play “Precious Little.” It opens August 2 at Seattle’s Annex Theater. Director Katherine Karaus and cast members give us a taste of the play and talk about the role of language onstage and in life.

Update On Boeing
Boeing’s profit is up 13 percent, despite the troubles the company has been facing lately. The Boeing 787, 737 and 777 have all been in the headlines for fires and faulty landings. Boeing is looking for fixes to the problems as the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board continue to investigate the Asiana 214 crash in San Francisco, the 787 fire at Heathrow airport and the Southwest crash at LaGuardia. Christopher Drew, the Pentagon and aerospace reporter for the New York Times explains the latest news from Boeing.

What Does It Mean For A City To Lose Its Art Collection?
When the city of Detroit declared bankruptcy last week, creditors began to eye existing assets. One stood out: The art collection at the city-owned Detroit Institute of Arts. Appraisers put its value at roughly $2.5 billion. But is it that easy to sell off a cultural collection to pay off a city’s debt? And what does it mean to a city to lose that cultural collection? Seattle Art Museum Director Kimerly Rorshach explains some of the intangibles when it comes to valuing art.

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Income Mobility
11:43 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Seattleites Have An Easier Time On The Economic Ladder Than Others

It’s much easier to climb the economic ladder in Seattle than other affluent US cities such as Atlanta. That’s according to a new study by Harvard economists. So what makes Seattle a better place to grow up if you’re born into a low-income household? Ross Reynolds talks with co-author of the study, Nathan Hendren. 

Copper Theft
11:25 am
Thu July 18, 2013

Copping Copper: State Struggles With Illegal Scrap Metal Trade

Flickr Photo/Grant Hutchinson

Copper wire theft is a persistent problem. Most recently it put out the lights for property owners along Tacoma’s Thea Foss Waterway. Why is copper such a valuable thing to steal? And where is it being sold? Jay Sternoff is the legislative liaison for the Washington Chapter of the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries. He talks to Ross Reynolds about the world of stolen copper.

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