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We're updating this post as new information comes in.

There's still no sign of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 or the 239 people on board.

The plane went missing March 8, less than an hour after taking off from Kuala Lumpur on what was supposed to be about a six-hour flight to Beijing.

This post was updated at 7:22 p.m. ET.

Rescue workers in New York pulled an eighth body out the smoldering rubble of two Harlem buildings that collapsed because of a gas explosion that also injured more than 70 people.

Unfortunately, according to NBC New York, not everyone has been accounted for: Crews are still looking for three people who remain missing.

This post has been updated. Click here to jump to that news.

Revelry turned to horror early Thursday "after a car plowed through South by Southwest crowds in Downtown Austin," KUT reports.

Suspicion is immediately focusing on the Islamist group Boko Haram as word emerges about another horrific attack on school children in Nigeria.

Ukraine's Prime Minister And Government Resign

Jan 28, 2014
AP Photo/Sergei Chuzavkov

Ukraine's President Viktor Yanukovych has accepted the resignation of the prime minister and his cabinet amid continuing anti-government protests. Mykola Azarov had offered to step down as prime minister to create "social and political compromise."

Deadly Blasts Hit Police In Cairo

Jan 24, 2014
AP Photo/Sabry Khaled

Six people have been killed and some 100 others wounded in a series of explosions in the Egyptian capital of Cairo.

A powerful car bomb exploded outside the police headquarters in central Cairo on Friday morning, killing four people and wounding at least 76.

AP Photo/Sergei Chuzavkov

Violent protests in Ukraine have spread beyond the capital, Kiev, as President Viktor Yanukovych held a meeting with three opposition leaders to try to end the unrest.  The governor of Lviv, in the west, was forced to sign his resignation as protesters stormed his offices.

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A woman in her 20s was found shot dead at 4:30 a.m. on Friday morning just off the Burke-Gilman trail in Seattle’s Wallingford neighborhood.

Police believe this was a targeted hit and that the woman was not killed at random. Officers have not yet identified the woman, according to a police spokesman.

A passerby found the woman on the popular trail at North Northlake Way and Eastern Avenue North and called 911.

Homicide detectives initially cleared the area and have since reopened the trail to pedestrians and cyclists.

Golden Dawn party members are on trial today in Greece. Golden Dawn is an anti-immigrant party on the rise there. The government cracked down on the group over the weekend. They're responding to a toxic stew of racism and poverty reminiscent of pre-WW2 Germany.

Sentencing begins soon for Carri and Larry Williams. They were convicted of several charges this week in the death of their 13-year-old adopted daughter Hana Williams.

In May 2011, the Ethiopian teenager died in her own backyard from hypothermia. Her autopsy also found that malnutrition was a contributing factor.

This week, her adopted parents were both convicted of first-degree manslaughter. Carri Williams was convicted of the most serious charge: homicide by abuse. Larry Williams was not. On that charge, the judge declared a mistrial.

Many questions involving a possible retrial, appeals, and sentencing remain unanswered. Rich Weyrich is the prosecuting attorney for Skagit County. He talked with Ross Reynolds. Cassie Trueblood served as defense attorney for Larry Williams. She talked with Marcie Sillman.

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

The city of Seattle has no basketball team yet, but the fight over a proposed arena continues.

The state Court of Appeals upheld a decision to dismiss a lawsuit by the International Longshore and Warehouse Union over the proposed site for a new basketball arena in SODO.

The longshoremen argued that an environmental review should have happened before the city made an agreement with arena investor Chris Hansen.

The appeals court ruled that the Memorandum of Understanding between the city of Seattle, King County and Hansen did not constitute final approval for the project. In essence, the court wrote that there was no action as of yet to challenge.  

More than 300 people turned out Thursday in Spokane for the burial of World War II veteran Delbert Belton. The 88-year-old was robbed and beaten to death last week while he waited in his car.

Scores of veterans turned out to honor Belton at a cemetery in west Spokane. Friends and family remember a man who loved to repair cars by day and go out dancing at night, and went by the nickname Shorty.

The service also drew many people in Spokane who never knew Belton, but, like Karen Schute, felt compelled to be there.

Police have arrested the second teenager accused of beating to death an 88-year-old World War II vet in Spokane. The two 16-year-old males have been charged with first degree robbery and first degree murder in case that's attracted national attention.

Delbert Belton was beaten beyond recognition while he waited in his car outside the Eagles Lodge in north Spokane last week. Belton, known as "Shorty" to his friends, served in the Army and had survived injuries in the battle of Okinawa.

A federal review team is taking a close look at the Snohomish County Jail in Everett this week. The review comes after last month’s death of a jail inmate. It was the eighth such death since 2010.

AP Photo/Hassan Ammar

Hundreds of people gathered at a mosque in Ramses Square on Friday, after the Muslim Brotherhood, of which Mr. Morsi is a member, appealed to its supporters to join a "march of anger".

The demonstrations are taking place under the slogan "the people want to topple the coup" - referring to the military's removal of Mr. Morsi on 3 July.

Egypt Declares National Emergency

Aug 14, 2013
AP Photo/Ahmed Gomaa

Egypt's presidency has declared a state of emergency after scores of people were killed when security forces stormed protest camps in Cairo.

The camps had been occupied by supporters of former president Mohammed Morsi, who was deposed in early July.

Seattle Times Editor Departing For Dean Position

Aug 1, 2013
Flickr Photo/European Citizen

In this era of digital media David Boardman, the departing executive editor of the Seattle Times, said he sees a great future ahead for newspapers.

State Supreme Court Blasts “Institutional Racism” In Jury Selection

Aug 1, 2013

Race, racism and fairness are at the heart of a stack of opinions released today by the Washington state Supreme Court. The court issued 110 pages about one murder conviction, even though it was not overturned today. KUOW’s Phyllis Fletcher gives us the lowdown on the latest Supreme Court ruling.

"Hackerspaces" are popping up all over the Northwest. But these aren't dens of computer infiltrators.

What we're talking about are community workshops for tinkering, machine tooling, 3-D printing and any other hands-on creativity you can think of. Some market themselves under the more benign-sounding label of "maker space." These workshops are now drawing attention as private incubators for entrepreneurship.

But let's straighten out this name business.

Potreprenuers Get Ready For A New Kind Of Drug Deal

Jul 30, 2013
Flickr Photo/Benoit Deniaud

With recreational pot legal in Washington state, the marijuana business is moving from back alleys to storefronts. Former Silicon Valley banker Brendan Kennedy wants to lead the way in the new pot economy. He is CEO of Privateer Holdings, a cannabis-focused venture capital fund. He’ll explain to Ross Reynolds why he sees it as a $50 billion legal business.

The Dangers Of Senior Assisted Living

Jul 30, 2013
Flickr Photo/ma neeks

Seattle-based Emeritus Senior Living is the country’s largest assisted living operator, housing approximately 37,000 elderly Americans in more than 400 facilities across the country. Frontline and ProPublica teamed up to investigate reports on the failures of Emeritus. The year-long investigation resulted in a series of articles and a documentary on the dangers of senior care. Ross Reynolds hears from A.C. Wilson, a reporter at ProPublica, about the dark side of senior assisted living.

Future Of Wash. State GOP After Kirby Wilbur

Jul 30, 2013
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Kirby Wilbur, the head of the Washington state GOP, resigned on Monday and has left the party struggling to find a new leader. As chair he led the Republicans to take greater control of the state Legislature but lost key races for governor and attorney general.

US Army

A solider from Joint Base Lewis-McChord will be awarded the Medal of Honor.

Spokane-born Staff Sgt. Ty Carter of  will be one of only a handful of living American soldiers to receive the nation’s highest military honor. The Army says US troops were far outnumbered that day in 2009 at Combat Outpost Keating in eastern Afghanistan. During the battle the Army says Carter killed enemy troops and risked his own life to save an injured soldier pinned down by a barrage of enemy fire.

AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon

Several news outlets reported Monday that former President Jimmy Carter may travel to North Korea to secure the release of Kenneth Bae, who's been imprisoned in North Korea for nine months.

The unconfirmed reports raised hopes for Bae's family members, though they said they had not been informed of any specific plans to seek his release.

How Will The President's Economic Plan Play In Washington?

Jul 25, 2013

President Obama has set off on a short trip with a few speeches discussing the long term needs of our economy, but what would these policies mean in Washington state? Ross Reynolds sits down with Marilyn Watkins, policy director at the Economic Opportunity Institute, and Paul Guppy, vice president for research at the Washington Policy Center, to find out more on what the president's goals mean for the Evergreen State.

An Oregon shipping company and the U.S. Forest Service appear to be at a standoff over whether huge pieces of oil equipment will pass through a scenic stretch of Idaho. These so-called “megaloads” are ultimately headed to the oil sands of Alberta, Canada.

The Forest Service says it can’t authorize shipments that are as wide as two lanes and the length of five semi-trailers to use a protected portion of Highway 12. At least, not without a lengthy review.

Flickr Photo/Alex Abboud and illustration by Kara McDermott

DEA Raids Puget Sound Pot Dispensaries
Federal drug enforcement agents raided marijuana dispensaries around Puget Sound on Wednesday afternoon. We’ll bring you the latest and speak with Alison Holcomb of the ACLU of Washington.

Art Of Our City: Precious Little
What are the limits of language? Sometimes we speak better when we communicate without traditional words or vocabularies. That’s one of the themes of Madeline George’s play “Precious Little.” It opens August 2 at Seattle’s Annex Theater. Director Katherine Karaus and cast members give us a taste of the play and talk about the role of language onstage and in life.

Update On Boeing
Boeing’s profit is up 13 percent, despite the troubles the company has been facing lately. The Boeing 787, 737 and 777 have all been in the headlines for fires and faulty landings. Boeing is looking for fixes to the problems as the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board continue to investigate the Asiana 214 crash in San Francisco, the 787 fire at Heathrow airport and the Southwest crash at LaGuardia. Christopher Drew, the Pentagon and aerospace reporter for the New York Times explains the latest news from Boeing.

What Does It Mean For A City To Lose Its Art Collection?
When the city of Detroit declared bankruptcy last week, creditors began to eye existing assets. One stood out: The art collection at the city-owned Detroit Institute of Arts. Appraisers put its value at roughly $2.5 billion. But is it that easy to sell off a cultural collection to pay off a city’s debt? And what does it mean to a city to lose that cultural collection? Seattle Art Museum Director Kimerly Rorshach explains some of the intangibles when it comes to valuing art.

Seattleites Have An Easier Time On The Economic Ladder Than Others

Jul 23, 2013

It’s much easier to climb the economic ladder in Seattle than other affluent US cities such as Atlanta. That’s according to a new study by Harvard economists. So what makes Seattle a better place to grow up if you’re born into a low-income household? Ross Reynolds talks with co-author of the study, Nathan Hendren. 

Copping Copper: State Struggles With Illegal Scrap Metal Trade

Jul 18, 2013
Flickr Photo/Grant Hutchinson

Copper wire theft is a persistent problem. Most recently it put out the lights for property owners along Tacoma’s Thea Foss Waterway. Why is copper such a valuable thing to steal? And where is it being sold? Jay Sternoff is the legislative liaison for the Washington Chapter of the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries. He talks to Ross Reynolds about the world of stolen copper.

Bill To Protect Veterans Against Discrimination

Jul 17, 2013
United States Congress

If you are a veteran looking for a job in Washington state, employers can’t refuse to hire you because of your military status. That’s because of a 2006 law protecting veterans against discrimination. But in most states that’s not the case. United States Congressman Derek Kilmer (WA-06) wants to change that. Ross Reynolds talks to Representative Kilmer about how his bill would protect all veterans and service members from employer and housing discrimination nationwide.

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