net neutrality

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler gestures near the end of a hearing for a vote on Net Neutrality, Feb. 26, 2015
AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Today, the Federal Communications Commission approved net neutrality in a 3-2 vote. That means that Internet service providers, which includes cable companies like Comcast, can’t selectively slow down Internet data speeds in favor of paid fast lanes.

So what does that mean for consumers and companies in the Seattle area?

Later this morning, the Federal Communications Commission will take a vote on adopting new rules that would keep the Internet neutral.

Update at 1 p.m. ET 2/26: FCC Adopts Net Neutrality

Flickr Photo/Douglas Woods (CC-BY-NC), edit by KUOW/Kara McDermott

Ross Reynolds talks with Cheezburger Networks' CEO, Ben Huh, about net neutrality and what that means for Washington business.

Can We Even Really Have Net Neutrality?

May 20, 2014
Flickr Photo/espensorvik (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks to Seattle Times technology columnist Brier Dudley about net neutrality. As advocates worry about the FCC's proposed rules on net beutrality, Dudely explains why the whole idea might be a myth anyway.

Flickr Photo/Ian Britton (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Maggie Reardon, senior writer for CNET News, about the Federal Communications Commission's decision to forgo an appeal of the court ruling that threw out net neutrality rules. The FCC has announced it will rewrite the existing rules instead.

Flickr Photo/Jonathan Moreau (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with CNET News senior writer Maggie Reardon about Tuesday's federal appeals court decision that says Internet service providers aren't required to treat all Internet traffic equally.