Native Americans

Tulalip Tribe
12:05 pm
Wed April 17, 2013

From Vietnam To Fisherman: Tulalip Tribe Chairman Mel Sheldon Talks Life Then And Now

Mel Sheldon is chairman of the Tulalip Tribe, but he wasn’t always in politics. Chairman Sheldon fished for 25 years. Before that he worked as a houseboy at two University of Washington sororities. And before that, Sheldon served as a pilot in Vietnam.

Chairman Sheldon says he likes “life on the edge," he likes being busy and he likes working hard. Ross Reynolds talks with Tulalip Tribe Chairman Mel Sheldon about his life, career and hopes for the future.

Chief Seattle Treaty
5:39 pm
Tue March 26, 2013

Duwamish Tribe Renews Hopes For Federal Recognition

Cecile Hansen, chairwoman of the Duwamish Tribe.
Courtesy Photo

At the Duwamish Longhouse in West Seattle, Cecile Hansen traces her finger down a plaque of names. “Look at all our leaders, starting with the chief here,” Hansen says.

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Indian Health Service
5:27 pm
Mon December 10, 2012

Native American Veterans Get New Access To Local Health Care

American Indian and Alaska Native veterans can now see local Indian Health Service providers for care that is covered by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

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Law
1:34 pm
Mon November 26, 2012

Northwest Tribes Begin To Try Reservation Crime Cases Under Tougher Laws

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 5:27 pm

A tribal court on the Umatilla Indian Reservation is one of the first to hand-down a long prison term under new tougher criminal sentencing laws enacted by Congress in 2010.

It used to be that tribes could only sentence a Native American criminal to up to one year of jail time -- no matter the crime. Typically the U.S. Justice Department was called in for everything else -– but many cases were dropped.

Now, tribal courts have the power to sentence native criminals who commit crimes on a reservation up to three years per count, for up to nine years.

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Arts & Life
9:00 am
Thu November 8, 2012

Photographer Matika Wilbur On Documenting Native America

Photographer Matika Wilbur
Credit Matika Wilbur

Photographer Matika Wilbur is a member of the Tulalip Tribe raised on the Swinomish Reservation. Her work explores themes of Native American identity and cultural duality, and has appeared in the Royal British Columbia Museum of Fine Arts, The Nantes Museum of Fine Arts in France, the Seattle Art Museum and the Burke Museum. She joins us to talk about her new project to photograph Native Americans from all 562 tribes in the United States.

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History
6:08 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Oregon Panel Considers Proposals For Renaming 'Squaw Creeks'

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 4:53 pm

Two relatively obscure waterways in rural southeast Oregon are generating a heated dispute over geographic names. The small streams are both named "Squaw Creek," which is considered offensive to Native Americans. But the landowners in each case object to the proposed new names.

A 25-member volunteer panel called the Oregon Geographic Names Board is methodically working to erase the term "squaw" from the state map. Often, the new names are suggested by Native Americans.

Board president Sharon Nesbit says that's the case for two remote creeks in rural Harney County.

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