music

Latin Music
12:50 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

From Austin, Con Amor: Our Favorites From SXSW

Cafe Tacvba performs at Stubb's during SXSW 2013.
Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 8:02 am

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Guitar Making During Wartime
11:37 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Rosie The Riveter Had A Sister, Laura The Luthier

Courtesy of John Thomas

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 1:40 pm


PORTLAND - During World War II, a popular song called "Rosie the Riveter" turned female assembly workers into icons. Women filled in at places like the Boeing airplane factory in Seattle and the Kaiser shipyards in Portland while the men went off to war.


But one famous guitar company allegedly tried to hide the fact that it was using female replacements to keep making its musical instruments. Now, seven decades later, a Portland guitarist is helping to tell that story.

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Musical Performance
9:00 am
Fri March 8, 2013

Singer-Songwriter Shelby Earl Live In Studio

Shelby Earl performing at Neumos in 2011.
Credit Photo Credit/Dave Lichterman For KEXP

Seattle singer-songwriter Shelby Earl released her debut album, the folk-rock "Burn the Boats," in 2011. Since then she’s been touring and working on her second album, due out this year. She stops by the studio to play a few songs ahead of her trip to Austin's South by Southwest festival.

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Musical Maladies
12:29 pm
Thu February 21, 2013

The Science Of Songs You Can't Escape

I just can't get you out of my head!
Flickr Photo/hobvias sudoneighm

It sounds shocking, but earworms are an epidemic that affect at least 90 percent of people as often as once a week. That’s according to a Goldsmiths University study. But before you go logging onto WebMD, fear not! These earworms are more commonly referred to as songs, regular old songs — often radio hits or catchy grooves that burrow deep within the human brain. For instance, maybe you've been visited by this hungry earworm:

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Energy & Environment
9:00 am
Thu February 21, 2013

The Price Of North Dakota's Oil Boom

A winter sunrise across an oil field in North Dakota.
Credit Flickr photo/Adam Schreiner

North Dakota is booming. The state's unemployment rate is just 3.2 percent — well below the national average of 7.9 percent. Officials are trying to keep pace with a population surge brought on by oil industry jobs that have made North Dakota the country's number two oil-producing state. But what will extracting millions of barrels from the Bakken oil field mean for the region's environmental and economic future? Writer and reporter Richard Manning joins us with the story of North Dakota's oil boom.

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Celebrating The Past
5:00 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

New Life For Restored Memories From Seattle’s Female Rockers

Sarah Rudinoff in "These Streets."
Photo/Charles Peterson

You probably know the bands that put Seattle on the international music map in the early 1990s. Nirvana, Soundgarden and Pearl Jam have become legends, but they're only part of the Seattle music story. Women rocked the scene, too. Gretta Harley came to Seattle in 1990, looking for her tribe, and she says she found it.

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First Listen
3:10 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

First Listen: 'Son Of Rogues Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys'

Keith Richards collaborates with Tom Waits in "Shenandoah" for Son of Rogues Gallery, out Feb. 19.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun February 24, 2013 5:40 am

Audio for this feature is no longer available.

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Support Services
9:00 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Is Help On The Way For Kids "Aging Out" Of Foster Care?

What support systems do foster kids have as adults?
Credit Flickr photo/James Evans

Turning 18 marks a form of adulthood at least, bringing new independence and legal rights. For a foster child in Washington state, turning 18 can also mean the end of a stable home life. InvestigateWest reporter Claudia Rowe joins us with the story of one young woman’s experience “aging out” of foster care, and what state government might do to help.

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Love Songs
2:37 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

From Alt.Latino, With Love: A Valentine's Day Extravaganza

Chilean rapper Ana Tijoux.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 8:03 am

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Brazillian Music
1:41 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Jovino Santos Neto: The Sorcerer's Apprentice

Jovino Santos Neto, piano, and Paul Taub, flute, play the little-known flute music of Jovino's mentor, Hermeto Pascoal.
Credit Cornish College of the Arts Photo

In 1977, Cornish College of the Arts faculty member Jovino Santos Neto was coming back home to Brazil after university studies in Canada. Jovino was planning to do graduate work in biology in the Amazon rain forest. But on a whim, Jovino decided to first knock on the door of the famous Brazilian composer, bandleader and multi-instrumentalist Hermeto Pascoal.

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Arts & Entertainment
10:00 am
Tue February 12, 2013

Chat Room: Grammys Awarded, Bushes Hacked, Soderbergh Out

Portland musician Esperanza Spalding accepts the jazz vocal album for "Radio Music Society" at the 55th annual Grammy Awards on Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013, in Los Angeles.
Credit Photo by John Shearer/Invision/AP

More than 28 million people tuned in to watch the Grammy Awards — how much do the Grammy's actually have to do with music? Bush family photos are posted online after a hacker breaks into several private email accounts. What kind of a window is it into the former president’s life, and is it a window we should be caught looking through? Also, director Steven Soderbergh says he's retiring from filmmaking. What legacy does he leave behind and how does film fit into the storytelling medium today? Northwest Film Forum’s Lyall Bush, singer and songwriter Rachel Flotard and Three Imaginary Girls co-founder and editor Liz Riley join us to discuss the week's art and culture news.

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Pop Legend
8:19 am
Mon February 4, 2013

The Roots Of Beyonce's Super Bowl Spectacular

Beyonce performs during the Super Bowl halftime show Sunday night.
Ezra Shaw Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 9:38 am

One of the Twitter hashtags devised by rabid Beyonce fans before last night's Super Bowl halftime show was religious in nature: #praisebeysus. Praise Beysus! This bit of hyperventilating resonated in interesting ways. Strutting into the very center of America's biggest television spectacle, the 31-year-old superstar intended to secure her place in the musical pantheon next to recent Super Bowl-approved legends Madonna, The Who, Bruce Springsteen and Prince.

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Arts & Entertainment
9:00 am
Fri February 1, 2013

A Conversation With Music Legend Dr. John

Dr. John performing in 2011.
Credit Flickr photo/Jazz Fest Wien Team

Dr. John has been in the right place and the wrong place but it's always the right time for his music. The multiple Grammy Award-winner and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee has been playing music since he was a teenager. His most recent album, "Locked Down," was produced by Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys and has him playing a Farfisa organ while he sings of revolution, the scourge of crack and the goodness of god. We talk with Mac Rebennack, a.k.a. Dr. John, ahead of his shows at Seattle's Jazz Alley.

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Classical Music
5:14 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Schubert And The Minimalists: Savoring The Journey

Seattle Weekly music writer and composer Gavin Borchert.
Credit Courtesy/Gavin Borchert

  

The old saying “it’s about the journey, not the destination” is one that comes to mind when listening to the music of Franz Schubert. Seattle Weekly music writer and composer Gavin Borchert has been thinking a lot lately about Schubert and the distinctive way the composer’s music slowly unfolds over time. To Gavin’s ears, Schubert, an early 19th century composer, has a strong kinship with American minimalist composers of the 20th and 21st centuries. That kinship is explored in a new recording called “The Knights:  A Second of Silence.”

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Immigration
10:00 am
Tue January 29, 2013

The Politics Of Federal Immigration Reform

Sen. Robert Menendez and Sen. Charles Schumer join a bipartisan group of leading senators to announce that they have reached agreement on the principles of sweeping legislation to rewrite the nation's immigration laws, during a news conference at the Capitol in Washington, Monday, Jan. 28, 2013. The deal covers border security, guest workers and employer verification, as well as a path to citizenship for the 11 million illegal immigrants already in this country.
Credit AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite


There appears to be a bipartisan deal in Congress to reform the country's immigration policy, as Democrats and Republicans dance a delicate dance in the hopes that neither party jeopardizes the agreement. The proposal by a Senate "Gang of Eight" creates a path to citizenship for 11 million people living in the US without documentation, creates a more secure border and, the GOP hopes, could reshape the political calculations of a growing segment of the electorate. We look at the policy and the politics of immigration reform with University of Washington pollster Matt Barreto.

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