music

Can You Make A Living Making Music?

Jul 10, 2013

From buskers in the market to the flood of Seattle musicians over the speakers at Sea-Tac airport, Seattle has long been known for its musical ties. But can you make a living making music? Ross Reynolds talks about why Seattle University's Quinton Morris wants to destroy the idea of the starving artist and what Sub Pop's Tony K thinks musicians should know about publishing rights. 

You sang it in elementary school, summer camp or church, and you probably still remember the lyrics. Woody Guthrie’s “This Land Is Your Land” is arguably the most iconic American folk song, though history has glossed over the political messages hidden in some of the seldom-sung verses. Robert Santelli unravels the song in this talk recorded at the Elliott Bay Book Company on May 23, 2012.

On The Job, And The Band Lemolo

Jul 3, 2013
Flickr Photo/David Lee

On The Job: Bear Keeper
Katy Sewall gets up close and personal with the grizzly bears at Woodland Park Zoo.

Lemolo
Meagan Grandall and Kendra Cox met while teaching kayaking during the summer in Poulsbo. A few years later they started the dream-pop band Lemolo and began opening for local group The Head And The Heart. In 2012 they self-released their debut album "Kaleidoscope" and have played Sasquatch, Bumbershoot, Neumos and the Showbox. They talk about their music and perform in studio.  

From Seattle Brain Cancer Walk's Facebook page.

New Music Picks
Are you stuck in a music listening rut? Music writer Jonathan Zwickel is here to help you branch out. He recommends two Seattle electronic music artists with an aeronautical theme.

In Memoriam: Dr. Foltz On Brain Cancer
Dr. Greg Foltz dedicated over 25 years of his life to brain cancer research and treatment.  He was the director of the Ivy Brain Tumor Center and he founded Seattle’s annual Seattle Brain Cancer Walk.  Dr. Foltz died last Thursday, a short time after receiving a pancreatic cancer diagnosis.  

The Weather And Hike Of The Week
Michael Fagin suggests a hike that matches the week’s weather forecast.

From Queensryche's Facebook page.

President Obama Visits Africa
President Obama is making his third and longest trip to Africa, his first visit since winning reelection. The president intends to “reinforce the US' commitment to expanding economic growth” in Africa. We talk with Witney Schneidman, nonresident fellow with the Africa Growth Initiative.

Art Of Our City: Dueling Queensrÿches
Fans of the Seattle band Queensrÿche have a lot be psyched about this week: a brand new album and two live shows. Queensrÿche performed last night at The Crocodile, and they’ll perform again this Saturday night at The Moore. Problem is, it’s actually two different bands, both using the name Queensrÿche. Following a huge fight last summer, the band split in two. What’s going on here? Decibel Magazine editor-in-chief Albert Mudrian helps us sort it out.

Seattle Transgender Pride
The Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act this week, paving the way for same-sex married couples to receive the same federal rights and protections afforded to heterosexuals. The ruling is celebrated within the LGBT community as a huge step towards equality. But for transgender people – the T in LGBT – discrimination and inequality is still a very real and pressing threat across the country.

Flickr Photo/Dan4th Nicholas

U.S. Supreme Court Rules on Voting Rights Act
The U.S. Supreme Court issued another of its long-awaited decisions, this one on the landmark 1964 Voting Rights Act. The Court ruled 5-4 to strike down a provision of the law that involves federal oversight for states with a history of racial discrimination in voter registration. How might the ruling affect current charges of voter suppression? We talk with attorney and voting rights advocate Brenda Wright.

New Music Recommendation
Are you stuck in a music listening rut?  We are surrounded by new music and innovative artists.  Branch out! Paul De Barros, critic for the Seattle Times, recommends jazz violinist Zach Brock.

What’s In Your Food?
Take a look at a food label. Under the list of ingredients there are sure to be items you recognize, but what about polyglycerol? Aspartame? Or phosphoric acid? The Food Additives Amendment of 1958 was enacted to make sure chemical ingredients were safe for consumption, but how does the FDA monitor all of the chemicals and ingredients food producers use? Professor Marion Nestle, from the department of nutrition food studies and public health, explains what goes into the food we consume and how to be a more informed consumer.

The Weather And Hike Of The Week
Michael Fagin suggests a hike that matches the week’s weather forecast.

Listener Call-In: What Is Your Theme Song?

Jun 24, 2013
Flickr Photo/Cliff Nordman

  What Is Your "Walking Into A Room" Theme?
When you think of Darth Vader, you undoubtedly hear "The Imperial March" playing as he swoops in, black robes flowing behind him. His theme song is as distinct to him as his dark clothing and red light saber. It sets the mood of the room before he even enters it, and it tells you a lot about him and his personality, without having to say a word. So if a theme song played every time you walked into a room, what song would you choose? Tell us what your song is and why by leaving a message on our feedback line at 206.685.2526 or by  emailing Weekday.

Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives

 McGinn Testifies About Coal Exports In Washington DC
The US House Energy and Commerce Committee is holding a panel entitled U.S. Energy Abundance: Regulatory Market and Legal Barriers to Export." Seattle mayor Mike McGinn is in Washington DC testifying. KUOW's Ashley Ahearn reports on the latest.

Worth Listening To: A Music Recommendation
Are you stuck in a music listening rut?  We are surrounded by new music and innovative artists. Branch out! New music recommendations every Tuesday at 9:20 a.m. This time Seattle Weekly classical music writer Gavin Borchert recommends Seattle musician Hope Wechkin.

Anticipating The Big Northwest  Earthquake
There was a time, 90 years ago when the Puget Sound area was declared “earthquake-proof” by a prominent geologist. As scientists have continued to study the Northwest, however, they’ve come to realize that statement couldn’t be further from the truth. This area is in fact prone to not just earthquakes, but mega-quakes too. Sandi Doughton, science reporter for The Seattle Times explains what scientists know about the “the big one" that is due to strike the region.

Author Collaborates With Decemberists Offshoot Black Prairie

Jun 17, 2013
Flickr Photo/David Lee

The New York Times and Slate Magazine journalist Jon Mooallem is the author of "Wild Ones: A Sometimes Dismaying, Weirdly Reassuring Story About Looking at People Looking at Animals in America." Mooallem collaborated with the Portland-based band Black Prairie to create a soundtrack for the book. David Hyde talks to Mooallen about the ever-worsening fate of polar bears, and then Black Prairie provides the musical backdrop with a live, in-studio performance.

The Seattle Times/Genevieve Alvarez

Audio Pending...

Sub Pop Records may have started small but the label has always made a big impression. Sup Pop, which began as a fanzine and evolved into a record label in the late 1980s, is considered the epicenter of the grunge movement. Megan Jasper, vice president at Sub Pop, gives Ross Reynolds a tour of the office.

Jazz Alley

Jazz vocalist Jane Monheit first visited us in the KUOW studios just after we moved into our then new facility on University Avenue in 1999. 

Public radio listeners and music lovers have followed Monheit's career for more than a decade now.  She made a sensational debut recording shortly after graduating from the Manhattan School of Music in the late 1990s.

Flickr Photo/brewbooks

 Snohomish County's New Executive
Former Snohomish County Sheriff John Lovick has been sworn in as the new Snohomish County Executive. He replaces former executive Aaron Reardon who left the office amid a series of scandals. Lovick said he hopes to “change the tone and tenor of county government” in his term. He talks about the challenges and opportunity awaiting him as Snohomish County Executive.

New Music Recommendation
Are you stuck in a music listening rut?  We are surrounded by new music and innovative artists.  Branch out! Ma'Chell Duma LaVassar shares thoughts on the women of Northwest music, past and present. 
     
Elwha: River Reborn, A Conversation With Lynda Mapes
After decades of debate, the two dams on the Elwha River are down.  Scientists are watching to see if the traditional salmon runs return and how that will impact the ecosystem near this river on the Olympic Peninsula.  Seattle Times reporter Lynda Mapes has followed this story.  Her new book, “Elwha: River Reborn,” chronicles the history, the controversy and the aftermath of the dam removal.

The Weather And Hike Of The Week
Michael Fagin suggests a hike that matches the week’s weather forecast.

Flickr Photo/Dan Muller

Science News: Understanding Scientific Data
Earlier this year research conducted by epidemiologist Katherine Flegal suggested that people who are “overweight” might live longer than those who are considered “thin” or “obese.” Her paper angered many in the public health sector whose research has long suggested that extra weight hurts a person’s health. One in particular, Dr. Walter Willett, the head of nutrition at Harvard’s School of Public Health, called Flegal’s study a “pile of rubbish.” Science writer Virginia Hughes explains the study and why it is being criticized.

Stone Gossard's New Album: "Moonlander"
Ten weeks prior to its release date, Seattle musician Stone Gossard began releasing songs off his new album "Moonlander" one week at a time. It is his second solo album since 2001. In addition to his solo career, Gossard continues to make music with Pearl Jam. Gossard joins us to discuss music, his career and his new album.

This hour on The Conversation we’re taking a long, strange trip through Seattle’s musical history. We’ll start before rock 'n roll was invented; when Seattle had a vibrant, professional music scene, thanks in part to powerful unions. We’ll learn about Jimi Hendrix’s early days when he got by as a backup guitarist for the likes of Little Richard. Also, author Charles R. Cross tells us how Ann and Nancy Wilson from the Seattle band, Heart, went from middle-class Bellevue teenagers to international stars.

What happened over the weekend? At 8:34 on Friday night, Kanye West tweeted. He said he'd be premiering a song in a half hour and we'd have to do what he said to hear it – we'd have to go to a particular address and stand outside with other people and watch a video projected onto the side of a building. Of course, the first video of the video was up within minutes, so most people didn't have to do any such thing.

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