music | KUOW News and Information


Slideshow: Fallout Records

Jan 18, 2013
Tim Hayes

Tim Hayes and Rob Fletcher share their memories of Fallout Records.

Tim Hayes, Owner, 1999-2003

"Fallout Records was a fiercely independent record-skateboard-zine/comic store that supplied the progressive, free-thinking consumer with creative alternative choices they couldn't find elsewhere or had no idea existed.

Want to Hear Beck’s New Music? Do It Yourself!

Jan 18, 2013
Wayne Horvitz

In the days before records were mass-produced, people learned about popular songs through sheet music.  The pop musician known as Beck (no relation to KUOW’s Dave Beck) was so intrigued by that idea that his latest album isn’t even a recording at all. 

Luz Bratcher / Flickr

Tomorrow is a dark day for many a Seattle vinyl enthusiast — Easy Street Records, the lower Queen Anne record store, is closing after serving the Emerald City for more than a dozen years. Many are bemoaning the loss of the Queen Anne record store, but what about you? Do record stores matter to you? I mean, do they really matter? Do you still buy music from stores, and how much?

With music available online through iTunes and services like Spotify, why do we still need record stores? Ross Reynolds talks with local music writer Charles Cross, Sarah Moody from Hardly Art and Eli Anderson from Neumos and takes listener calls.

Flickr photo/Laura Musselman Duffy

Seattle record store Easy Street is closing its Queen Anne location on Friday. While many local music lovers try to comfort one another, they’re also waxing poetic about how record stores used to be.

The Song That Sings The Year

Dec 28, 2012
Phil Hilfiker / Flickr

What is the song that sings 2012 for you? Is it a timeless favorite or a new track that captures your mood? Adele, Rihanna, Taylor Swift and Justin Bieber topped the pop charts. Carly Rae Jepsen’s “Call Me Maybe” was inescapable for a minute there.

Who topped the charts in your life? We want to hear about the one song that best sums up your experiences in 2012. Share your songs and music-related stories with us at 800.289.5869 or

We'll also get our regular weekend weather forecast from Nick Bond.

RICHLAND, Wash. – We’ve heard a lot about whistleblowers at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in southeast Washington. Some workers there have gone public with serious concerns about how the government is cleaning up radioactive waste.

But this story is about a different kind of Hanford Whistleblower.

Every Sunday evening at 7:15 p.m. sharp, Chris Doran welcomes several Hanford Whistleblowers into his book-filled home. His wife Nancy brings out the tea and homemade baked goods. They sit and chat politely. And then, they start to play.

Ann Powers' Top Albums And Songs Of 2012

Dec 12, 2012

Every year as I make my lists of best releases, I feel like that cartoon bodybuilder at the beach, ridiculously flexing in hopes of gaining some fluttery attention. How silly! My ego is all wrapped up in proving my superior powers of discernment, and here's the big competition, where my picks prove that I have more muscle than than my peers. Some years defeat the critic's effort to show off, however: consensus is so strong about a few releases that we all have to strike the same adoring poses.

courtesy of Experience Music Project

Jimi Hendrix may be one of Seattle’s most famous musical sons, but the legendary guitarist really made his name after he left home. A new show at the Experience Music Project, “Hear My Train A Comin': Hendrix Hits London,” argues that while Jimi Hendrix had a solid musical career in the United States, it wasn’t until he arrived in London in 1966 that he became the rock icon we remember.

How We Mourned John Lennon Before The Internet

Dec 7, 2012
Roy Kerwood / Wikipedia

John Lennon was murdered 30 years ago. We'll look back at how Seattleites mourned the death of the former Beatle in a time before the Internet, social media and cell phones.

The Year In Music

Dec 3, 2012
Flickr photo/Dave Lichterman

What kind of year was 2012 musically? Which artists rose to the top? What musical trends did you hear? We review the year in music with The Vera Project's Beth Warshaw-Duncan, Liz Riley of Three Imaginary Girls and writer/DJ/hip-hop artist Larry Mizell. What musical discoveries did you make this year? Share them with us at 206.543.5869 or

On today's show, we bring you some of our favorite segments of the year. We talk about vulnerability, photography and The Boss.

Is There Power In Vulnerability?

Being vulnerable and open to failure makes us uncomfortable, but according to the research of Brene Brown, we can’t have success without vulnerability. Ross Reynolds discusses the power of vulnerability with University of Houston Professor Brene Brown.

Seattle-Based Artist Goes Small Then Large To Highlight The Big Picture

Commemorating The Holocaust In Music

Nov 16, 2012
Photo courtesy of Music of Remembrance

Mina Miller is a Seattle pianist who founded the organization Music of Remembrance 15 years ago. Her passion for the organization springs in part from her family history. Mina comes from a Holocaust family.

Taj Mahal On A Life In Music

Nov 16, 2012
Jay Blakesberg

Two-time Grammy Award-winning musician, composer and vocalist Taj Mahal is celebrating four decades in American blues and roots with a new album, "Maestro." He joins us in the studio to talk about his musical life and legacy ahead of a run of shows with the Taj Mahal Trio starting tonight at Seattle's Jazz Alley.

KUOW Photo/Dave Beck

Stuart Zobel is the guitarist in the Seattle-based band Choroloco. The band plays music from Brazil called “choro.” Stewart says the infectious rhythms and melodies of the music, and the spirit of community associated with the choro style is what draws him to the music. He says:

AP Photo/Chris Pizzello

Wayne Kramer was the guitarist of the protopunk 60s band, the MC5. When the band broke up, Kramer drifted into addiction and drug dealing which landed him in a federal prison with a four-year term. Today he works on a program called Jail Guitar Doors, working to get music into prisons.  Ross Reynolds talks with Wayne Kramer about music programs in prison.

We speak with Karen Porterfield, candidate for Congress in Washington's 8th District, and Priya Guha, Britain's top diplomat in the Northwest. Plus, we hear live music from members of the award-winning Roosevelt High School Jazz Band and get a weekend weather forecast from Nick Bond.

Seattle's Tudor Choir sings choral music from Renaissance England and colonial America
Photo courtesy Tudor Choir

Seattle’s Tudor Choir is a 20 year-old institution founded by a University of Washington student with a passion for music and history. During his years at the University of Washington, Tudor Choir founder and artistic director Doug Fullington put together a group of fellow students to sing English Renaissance music associated with the Tudor Monarchy of the 15th and 16th centuries.

Elaine Brown. Image courtesy of Pat Thomas.
(Image courtesy of Pat Thomas)

Local record producer and writer Pat Thomas recently compiled a collection of music written by and for the Black Power movement,  "Listen, Whitey! The Sounds of Black Power 1965–1975." One of the musicians he discovered in putting the album together is a woman named Elaine Brown. She was the head of the Black Panther party during the mid '70s. Today, she's most well known for her activism for prisoners, but Pat thinks her music from the late '60s and early '70s has a message that still applies today.  He recommends listening to "Seize The Time," "The End of Silence" and "Until We're Free."

Seattle native and MC Macklemore and producer Ryan Lewis sit down with Ross Reynolds to discuss their careers, upcoming album and involvement with Washington’s pro same-sex marriage campaign. 

Sounds Familiar: Chopin's 'Funeral March'

Oct 2, 2012

KUOW Swing Years Host Amanda Wilde digs into the history behind the songs that sound familiar. This time out, we explore Chopin's “Funeral March.” Since it first appeared in the early 19th century, the famous tune has found its way into movies, cartoons, and funk and hip–hop music.  Amanda Wilde traces the lineage of Chopin's “Funeral March” with KUOW's Dave Beck. 

A Conversation With Dave Matthews

Oct 2, 2012
(Photo/Cifo aka Big Cif)

Musician Dave Matthews has a new album called “Away From The World.” He's just home from tour and joins us to muse on everything from the upcoming presidential election to avoiding wheat. Tune in for an off-the-cuff conversation between Dave and Steve, and pledge your support for KUOW.

Marcus Pimpleton Builds A Family Through All-City Band

Aug 16, 2012
Marcus Pimpleton wears a blue All-City Band polo shirt and talks into a microphone at the bottom of a set of bleachers where the All-City Band is practicing.
Kristin Viray

Marcus Pimpleton talks a lot about family. When he's teaching music, Pimpleton might compare a decrescendo to the way teens yell at their parents: they start loudly, but quickly get quiet when they realize it's a bad idea.

"People [in the band] appreciate you and treat you like family," Pimpleton told RadioActive's Farhan Vohra. He was describing the close-knit group of 150 students and mentors from the greater Seattle area who participate in the All-City Band. "They make it a comfortable place to be who you are."