music

Ross Reynolds interviews Seattle jazz pianist, composer and bandleader Overton Berry about his long long career stretching back 50 years.

Berry played at clubs around the 1962 World’s Fair and performed during Seattle's funk explosion of the 1970s. 

File photo.
Flickr Photo/Lis Ferla (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Joel Beckerman about his new book, "The Sonic Boom: How Sound Transforms The Way We Think, Feel And Buy," and about his work as a composer and sound designer.

The people behind "Now I'm Fine," a performance that melds music, comedy and storytelling at On The Boards this week.
On The Boards

It was 2006, and Ahamlefule J. Oluo was not fine. 

"I was very young, in my early 20s," he says. "I had just gone through a divorce." 

His Nigerian father, a man he'd never met and only spoken with once on the telephone, had died before Oluo got to fulfill his wish of forging a relationship with him.

The Native American Music Awards recognize indigenous musicians from the U.S., Canada and Latin America. It is considered to be the Grammys of Native American music.

Morning Edition is celebrating its 35th anniversary this week.

Over the years, many stories, voices and sounds have come and gone on the show. But there has remained one constant — our theme music.

The Morning Edition theme was written by BJ Leiderman in 1979. At the time, he was a struggling college student who wrote jingles on the side. He gave a demo tape of his music to a friend who worked at NPR.

On that tape was one little musical phrase that eventually became the Morning Edition theme music.

Courtesy of Cey Adams

Ross Reynolds speaks with graphic artist Cey Adams about how Adams' career has paralleled the rise of hip hop and rap culture over the past 30 years. 

Eight years after his death, James Brown is suddenly everywhere.

Sleater-Kinney is back together, has a new album coming out Jan. 20 via Sub Pop records, and will go on tour early next year. The album is called No Cities to Love, and you can listen to the first single, "Bury Our Friends," right here.

Flickr Photo/Paul Elliott (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Forty years ago, busking, or playing music in the street for money, became legal in Seattle. Now, it's officially "Busking Week" to celebrate, and KUOW caught up with local musician Josh Philpott as he played guitar downtown.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

You may not know his name, but you've probably heard his music.

Antonin Dvorak's New World Symphony contains some of the catchiest tunes in the classical music repertoire. The Czech-born composer was best known for synthesizing European folk melodies into his music. After an extended stay in New York in the late 1800s, Dvorak incorporated traditional American and African American tunes as well.

How My Basement Led Me To The Jazz Scene On Jackson Street

Sep 3, 2014
Public domain, via BlackPast.org

Nia Price-Nascimento lives in a house built in the 1920s in the Central District, Seattle's historically African-American neighborhood.  Last year, she found out there are two chambers hidden under the wooden floorboards in her basement creating a sub-basement. That led her to a journey back in time, as she explains in her own words.

Before I get into the story, you need to know I’m African American and Brazilian. I grew up in a mostly African-American neighborhood, but most of my friends are white, and I never really felt like I fit in. I recently got curious about my heritage.

Young Seattleites Feel Limited By Lack Of All-Ages Live Music

Sep 2, 2014
KUOW Photo/Noah Phillips Reardon

At Seattle's Capitol Hill Block Party this July, a crowd at the Main Stage was waiting for hip-hop artist ASAP Ferg to come out. The crowd was chanting and everyone was excited.

"There's a lot of emotions attached to music that you don't get with talking to somebody or going down the street," observed Mila Widmayer, 16. She's a singer and a volunteer at the Vera Project, an all-ages concert venue. "Music just affects your life in ways that other things can't."

Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with music journalist and author Charles R. Cross about music festivals in the Pacific Northwest. Have they become too big and corporate?

Courtesy of Kathleen Gillette

Kathleen Gillette has had a passion for singing for as long as she can remember. She was always "very excited about bringing a piece of music to the audience. I loved it. I just loved it.”

Life is about making difficult choices. Sometimes you make them, and other times it’s not up to you. For Gillette, life pulled the stage out from under her.

Jess Van Nostrand, The Project Room

Seattle was at the epicenter of the international music scene in the early 1990s. You've probably heard the stories about the bands that got big record deals, like Soundgarden, Mudhoney and Nirvana.

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