Macklemore's latest effort with producer Ryan Lewis is "Kevin," a funk-flavored tirade against the ravages of addiction, with a particularly scathing indictment against overprescription of medication. The Seattle duo is joined by soul singer Leon Bridges for the hook. "Doctor please give me a dose of the American dream," Bridges implores. "Put down the pen and look in my eyes. We're in the waiting room and something ain't right."

A portrait of composer Claude Debussy painted by Marcel  Baschet, 1884.
Public Domain

Pop music has always  borrowed liberally from classical themes: think Al Jolson’s 1920 hit “Avalon” lifting Puccini’s opera “Tosca,” 1970s disco sensation "A Fifth of Beethoven” or Vitamin C’s more modern sampling of Pachelbel’s “Canon in D Major.”

But it's a two-way street! In fact, the first borrowing might have taken place on the classical side.  

Carrie Brownstein: "Sleater-Kinney was a band that wanted to be heard. We had a set of ambitions and sometimes they felt anathema to those politics from which we came."
Autumn de Wilde

Rocker/actress/writer Carrie Brownstein spoke with The Record’s Ross Reynolds about the music scene in Olympia in the 1990s and why she thinks of Portland as a shrug.

Brownstein, of Sleater-Kinney and “Portlandia” fame, has a new memoir, "Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl." She did a reading Friday night at the Neptune Theatre in Seattle.

music symphony
Flickr Photo/Jason Burrows (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/

Calling all Francophiles!

Front Row Center is headed to the Seattle Symphony on Dec. 6 for Gabriel Fauré's "Requiem," which the Symphony calls "a masterpiece of utter serenity".

The Seattle Symphony and Chorale will perform together for this all-French program which will include Olivier Messiaen's "Poèmes pour Mi," and Claude Debussy's "Danses Sacrée et Profane."

Musician Wayne Horvitz.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

When Wayne Horvitz moved to Seattle, he was looking for a quiet place to chill out between road trips.

He never imagined himself in a symphony hall.

Bruce Pavitt and Adam Farish show off the 8Stem app, which they expect to launch to the public next year.
KUOW Photo/Ross Reynolds

When you play recorded music you can turn the volume up and down or adjust bass and treble – that’s about it.

Bruce Pavitt, co-founder of Sub Pop records, the record label that unleashed Nirvana on the world, thinks that’s pretty boring. So he’s teaming up with inventor Adam Farish to develop a new music format called 8Stem.

Pavitt and Farish told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds that it will upend recorded music by letting listeners engage more deeply with what they hear.

The White House sent out this pool report by Seattle Times reporter Jim Brunner.
White House local pool report

Our radio friends at KEXP and KNDD got some love from the Obama press corps when the president was in town last week.

Jim Brunner, a government reporter at the Seattle Times, was taking notes for local reporters. At 6:39 p.m., Brunner filed a brief report that was later shared by the White House press office. The motorcade had just left the Westin Hotel in downtown Seattle, where Obama was fundraising for Sen. Patty Murray.

Jazmyn Scott stands in front of a mural created for MOHAI by SPECSWIZARD who has been making art and beats in Seattle since 1978.
KUOW Photo/Jenna Montgomery

This week MOHAI opened a new show called The Legacy of Seattle Hip-Hop. The exhibit is not just about the history here, it’s also about how Seattle hip-hop fits into the larger culture.

For Daudi Abe, author of the upcoming book “Emerald Street: A History of Hip-Hop in Seattle 1979-2015,” it all began 36 years ago.

As part of a series called My Big Break, All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

A run-down bar in rural Alaska isn't any place for a kid. But when she was a child, that's where songwriter Jewel found her voice — on dingy stages at lumberjack joints.

Charles Corey of the University of Washington plays the chromelodeon, one of 57 instruments that composer Harry Partch created for his music.
KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

The door to room 5 at the University of Washington School of Music is solid wood, nothing to distinguish it from other classrooms.

But inside this cramped space is a collection of unusual instruments, handcrafted to play one man’s music.

Hospitals have a free and powerful tool that they could use more often to help reduce the pain that surgery patients experience: music.

Scores of studies over the years have looked at the power of music to ease this kind of pain; an analysis published Wednesday in The Lancet that pulls all those findings together builds a strong case.

Macklemore's "Thrift Shop" made Amanda Wilde's list. Here  the Seattle artist performs at the Gorge Amphitheater in George, Washington.
Flickr photo/Dave Lichterman

Washington state is on the edge – the geographical edge of the continental United States and the cutting edge of music.

Say the name "Les Paul" to anybody born after 1960, and they'll probably think you're talking about an electric guitar. But the musician and inventor, who was born 100 years ago Tuesday, was also an accomplished jazz guitarist. Paul was never happier than when playing for a live audience.