mudslide

Bill Radke talks with photojournalist Joshua Trujillo about his experience covering the Oso mudslide through photography.

Flickr Photo/Doc Searls (CC BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks with Los Angeles Fire Captain Ronald Klamecki about his own work in a landslide recovery in California and how authorities will decide regarding their next steps.

"As days go by, the potential of finding live victims diminishes. The rescuers are really putting forth the great effort and it wears on them too," he said. "They're doing their very best to bring closure to the victims' families."

U.S. Geological Survey

The last time the U.S. Geological Survey made a national map of landslide hazards, it did so on paper. It didn’t use laser imaging for landslide detection and it didn’t render the maps with high-powered geographic software near-universally used in today’s maps.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

The catastrophic mudflow that destroyed lives and homes a week and a half ago has come to be known as the Oso Landslide. That's led many to think the town has been wiped away.

KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Editor’s note: An earlier version of this story stated that land above the Oso landslide zone was logged in 2005. The site was logged in 2004 and replanted in 2005.

Seattle just wrapped up its wettest March on record, with 9.4 inches of rain reported at Sea-Tac International Airport. 

Geologists say near-record rain in the Cascade foothills was key in triggering the fatal landslide near the town of Oso, Wash., on March 22. But they say clear-cutting nearby could also have worsened the risk of the hillside collapsing.

Courtesy of Rae Ellen Bichell

About a dozen Seattle Seahawks and Sounders FC players visited the Darrington area Monday.

In a statement the Seahawks company said the teams wanted to offer a brief distraction for families devastated by the landslide near Oso, Wash.

This post was updated at 1:45 p.m. ET.

The search continues in Oso, Wash., for victims of the massive mudslide that swept through about 50 homes and properties on March 22.

Focus In Oso Shifts To A Search For Justice

Mar 31, 2014
AP Photo/Rick Wilking

David Hyde speaks with Karen Willie, an attorney who specializes in water law, about what the law can — and cannot — do for victims of the Oso mudslide.

Flickr Photo/GovInslee (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Washington Governor Jay Inslee Monday filed a formal request for a federal disaster declaration. If this is granted, it means the survivors of the massive landslide near Oso, Washington, would be eligible for federal assistance. Many of them will be counting on that since they don’t have landslide insurance.

KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

One week after a massive landslide wiped out the community of Oso, Wash., community members gathered at Darrington's First Baptist Church on Sunday to pray and tell stories of survival.

KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

As the local community held Sunday church services a week after the devastating Oso mudslide, searchers continued their work in the sodden destruction zone.

The Snohomish County Medical Examiner confirmed on Sunday evening that 21 people have died in the mudslide. Of these, only 15 have been officially identified.

The massive landslide in Oso, Wash., has shined a national spotlight on the damage this kind of natural disaster can cause.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Flickr Photo/Snohomish County

The death toll has risen to 18 following the devastating landslide near Oso, Washington. One bright spot: The number of people missing has fallen dramatically. It's now down to 30. 

KUOW Photo/Phyllis Fletcher

It's been nearly a week since the devastating landslide occurred near Oso, Wash. During this week, we've brought you official updates on rescue and recovery, and the voices of witnesses, survivors and community members trying to help. Here's a look back at the past week, from people in their own words.

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