mudslide

After Oso, Being Mayor Is Now A Full-Time Job

Sep 21, 2014
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KCTS Photo/Aileen Imperial

Darrington Mayor Dan Rankin grew up in this small town, like his father and his father before him. Though he moved away when he was younger, Rankin felt he had to move back. The town, he says, is something you can't get out of your soul.

In Oso, We Pulled Everybody Out Of The Mud

Sep 21, 2014
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KCTS Photo/Stacey Jenkins

Bob DeYoung helped recover bodies of friends and neighbors killed in the Oso slide. His wife Julie took care of people who survived. Today they're figuring out how to take care of their own needs.

After Oso, Reborn From Water And Mud

Sep 21, 2014
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KCTS Photo/Stacey Jenkins

Robin Youngblood cherished the nature around her home in Oso’s Steelhead Haven. When the landslide struck, she and a visiting friend were talking about a deer they had just seen. After the disaster, she left the Oso area. But something called her back. Now she lives a stone’s throw from state Route 530, a few miles east of the slide.

We Are All To Blame For The Oso Slide

Sep 21, 2014
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KCTS Photo/Katie Campbell

As a geomorphologist, Dan Miller has extensively studied the land formations and landslide history of the Stillaguamish Valley and Steelhead Haven. Miller and other scientists knew it to be a hazardous place, long before the devastating slide occurred. 

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KCTS Photo/Aileen Imperial

Gary Ray was the pastor at the Oso chapel in March. While doing work for the church on the morning of Saturday, March 22,  he received a call from another pastor in Darrington. There had been a massive landslide and he should come back, the pastor said. After the slide, Ray provided spiritual and emotional support for a community that prided itself on its strong sense of independence.

We're Staying In Oso, But Every Day We Say Goodbye

Sep 21, 2014
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KCTS Photo/Aileen Imperial

Ron Thompson was known as the mayor of Steelhead Drive. He and his wife Gail Thompson lost their home and many neighbors in the Oso landslide. But they’ve decided to stay in Oso, and start over in a new home just four miles from the old one. They find hope in rebuilding their community while striving to find meaning in the disaster.

Maggie Garrett’s eight Arabian and Appaloosa horses whinnied and struggled last Thursday night in their pens, mud up to their bellies. Garrett had jumped in a truck with her neighbor to save the horses she calls her babies from drowning in a flash flood.

Scientists Draw Lessons From Oso Landslide

Jul 22, 2014
Flickr Photo/Washington State DNR (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with David Montgomery, professor of geomorphology at the University of Washington, who was part of a team of scientists studying the aftermath of the Oso mudslide in order to help other communities prepare for future disasters.

Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Lisa Brooks speaks with Snohomish County Council Chair Dave Somers about a temporary ban on development in two landslide-prone areas near the site of the Oso, Wash., landslide that killed 43 people in March.

The Timberbowl Rodeo, in the town of Darrington, Washington, saw some of its largest crowds ever this past weekend. Neighbors gathered at the event to hug, shake hands and heal up a bit from this year's nearby terrible Oso landslide.

Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Martha Rasmussen, organizer of Darrington Day, about the fortuitous connection between the re-opening of state Route 530 and the annual celebration of Darrington Day. Both events take place Saturday May 31.

KUOW Photo/Ashley Ahearn

Barbara Ingram furrows her brow as she peers into a patch of woods up the road from her house. Developers have had their eyes on this place, too.

Amid Grief, Darrington Students Dress Up And Head To Prom

May 20, 2014
Courtesy of Taylor Lindeman

Taylor Lindeman and her boyfriend Anthony Smith drink Red Bull, waiting to get their hair done. Taylor will get a waterfall braid. Anthony wants a haircut, but he’s resisting Taylor’s efforts to have his red bushy beard trimmed. He keeps telling people he wants to grow it out and go “mountain man.”

KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

Aid agencies are reducing their presence in Oso and Darrington, a month and a half after a landslide hit the small community there, killing at least 41.

How Drones Quietly Mapped Oso Landslide Area

May 5, 2014
Tamara Palmer

As Washington Gov. Jay Inslee vetoed a bill in April that would have regulated drone use statewide, a consortium of disaster recovery specialists quietly negotiated the use of drones to make a 3-D model of the Oso mudslide.

Inslee vetoed the Legislature's bill on April 4 citing privacy and transparency concerns that he said were not adequately addressed, but he said he would still let drones fly in emergencies.

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