movies

River Health
3:05 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

'DamNation' Documentary Explores The Snake River Dam Controversy

The Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River in Washington.
Flickr Photo/Roberta Schonborg

Steve Scher talks to the filmmaker Travis Rummell, dam engineer Jim Waddell and Jim Ahern, a Lewiston, Idaho, native,  about the new documentary "DamNation." The film discusses the change in attitudes towards dam and river health.

SIFF
2:42 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

Shawn Telford's Tale Of Teens In "BFE"

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle actor Shawn Telford about his first feature film, "BFE."  It's the story of disaffected youth in a small Idaho town. The film had its local premier at the Seattle International Film Festival.

Seattle's Past
4:32 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Matt Smith's Last Year With The Nuns

Matt Smith in "My Last Year With The Nuns"
Credit John Jeffcoat, courtesy Matt Smith

Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood is hipster central these days: the place to go for the latest in music clubs, trendy restaurants and street style.

That wasn't always the case.

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Cage Fighting Ministers
10:43 am
Fri May 16, 2014

'I Can Love My Neighbor And Punch Him In The Face'

Preston "Pastor of Disaster" Hocker, KUOW's Ross Reynolds and Bryan Storkel, co-director of the documentary "Fight Church" in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Ross Reynolds interviews Bryan Storkel, the co-director of a new documentary called "Fight Church" about cage fighting Christian ministers, and Preston Hocker, one of those ministers who is known as the "Pastor of Disaster." 

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Author Interview
2:34 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

President Of Pixar And Disney Animation On Fostering Creativity

Ed Catmull, president of Disney.
Credit AP Photo/Joel Ryan

David Hyde talks to Ed Catmull, the co-founder of Pixar Animation Studios and president of Pixar and Disney animation, about managing creative people and his new book "Creativity Inc: Overcoming The Unseen Forces That Stand In The Way Of True Inspiration."

Movies
11:17 am
Fri April 25, 2014

But You Can Never Leave: 'The Girl And Death' In A Creepy Hotel

Sylvia Hoeks in The Girl and Death.
Jos Stelling Films

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 9:38 am

At the German hotel where Jos Stelling's The Girl and Death takes place, the guests include everyone from incapacitated men and women patiently awaiting death (the hotel seems to function in part as a makeshift sanatorium) to lively if somewhat unhinged residents given to impromptu performances of Romeo and Juliet monologues in the dining hall.

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Movies
11:15 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Tracing One Life, Lost In The Desert

Gael Garcia Bernal narrates and travels in the documentary Who Is Dayani Cristal?
Kino Lorber

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 3:41 pm

Who Is Dayani Cristal? attempts to humanize the many who illegally cross the U.S.-Mexico border by focusing on just one: a corpse found in the lethal Arizona desert with the words "Dayani Cristal" tattooed on his chest. The documentary follows the models of several genres of fictional films: the forensic procedural, the road movie, the man-who-wasn't-there mystery.

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Movies
11:14 am
Fri April 25, 2014

In 'Blue Ruin,' Revenge Is Not Served Cool

Macon Blair plays Dwight in the unsettling revenge thriller Blue Ruin.
Radius TWC

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 5:20 pm

Revenge at the movies is a dish best served not cold, but cool. Homemade justice isn't just meted out by the wronged onscreen; it's delivered with swagger, style, and steely-eyed bad-assery. Michael Caine as Carter, Uma Thurman as The Bride, Charles Bronson as Paul Kersey: These are all individuals who are suave under pressure and look pretty hip to boot, in well-tailored three-piece suits, canary yellow racing leathers, and black leather jackets. (Shotgun, katana, and .38 Special accessories definitely not optional.)

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Interview
8:40 am
Fri April 11, 2014

Kristen Wiig Gets Serious For Alice Munro Adaptation

Kristen Wiig plays a quiet caretaker named Johanna in Hateship Loveship.
Courtesy of Patti Perret, Hateship Capital LLC IFC Films

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 5:39 am

The new film Hateship Loveship was adapted from an Alice Munro short story and stars Saturday Night Live alumna Kristen Wiig in a performance that's a far cry from her outrageous characters on the comedy show.

In it, Wiig plays Johanna, a caretaker in Iowa assigned to help a grandfather, played by Nick Nolte, look after his 14-year-old granddaughter, Sabitha. Sabitha's mother died in a car accident when Sabitha's father, Ken, played by Guy Pearce, was driving drunk and high.

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Documentary
9:08 am
Fri March 21, 2014

'Jodorowsky's Dune': The Greatest Film That Never Was

A design sketch, by H.R. Giger, for the Harkonnen Castle as he envisioned it for Alejandro Jodorowski's Dune.
Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 2:03 pm

"Dune will be the coming of God."

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Movie Reviews
9:08 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Foreign Policy, With A Pugnacious French Twist

Arthur (Raphael Personnaz) is a new hire at the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, where Alexandre Taillard de Worms (Thierry Lhermitte) is the eccentric foreign minister.
Courtesy of Sundance Selects

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 2:03 pm

A frisky tour of the Gallic equivalent of the U.S. State Department, The French Minister boasts robust pacing, screwball-comedy banter and an exuberant central performance. For most American viewers, though, the movie could use footnotes to go with its subtitles.

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Movie Reviews
9:07 am
Fri March 21, 2014

A Teen On The Hunt, And Maybe In Over Her Head

Fourteen-year-old Lila (Gina Persanti) spends her summer looking for love — and finds a rough-edged older boy in It Felt Like Love.
Variance Films

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 2:03 pm

Feared and feared for in equal measure, today's teenagers are prisoners of pop and punditry. Branded as bad seeds or delicate flowers, they take shape in the public mind as either neglected or overprotected by their parents, abused by or abusive of the Internet, oversexed or terrified of sex. Is coming of age the pits, or what?

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Movie Reviews
9:07 am
Fri March 21, 2014

It's Either Art Or A Fire Hose, And We're Calling It The Latter

James (James Franco) is a retired actor who may or may not be suffering from a degenerative mental illness in Maladies, an art film from New York painter, sculptor and filmmaker Carter.
Tribeca Films

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 3:10 pm

Many years ago, the great and grumpy British TV writer Dennis Potter (The Singing Detective, Pennies From Heaven) rounded a corner in a prominent New York art museum and stood wondering whether the coiled thingy on the wall in front of him was a work of art or an emergency fire hose.

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Movie Interviews
9:07 am
Fri March 21, 2014

From Action Hero To Teenage Nerd, Shailene Woodley Has Range

Shailene Woodley, pictured at this year's Independent Spirit Awards, stars in the forthcoming Divergent, a big-screen adaptation of the first book in Veronica Roth's dystopian trilogy.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 4:45 am

"I'm sorry you have to see my pancake face."

Those are among Shailene Woodley's first words as she opens the door to a suite in the Beverly Wilshire Hotel. She's got a publicists' luncheon later in the day — otherwise, she explains, under absolutely no condition would she have worn makeup for an interview.

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Movie Reviews
8:51 am
Fri March 7, 2014

Wes Anderson's New Hotel Proves Pretty Grand Indeed

Gustave H. (Ralph Fiennes, with Saoirse Ronan and Tony Revolori) is a hotel concierge in an Eastern Europe falling under Hitler's shadow — a man pining for the Old World sensibility that's fading all around him.
Bob Yeoman Fox Searchlight Pictures

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 5:07 am

Chances are you've already made up your mind about Wes Anderson. Either you're willing to go with the meticulous symmetry of his dollhouse compositions, the precious tchotchke-filled design sensibility and the stilted formality of his dialogue, or you check out of his storybook worlds in the first five minutes. On the evidence of his eighth feature, The Grand Budapest Hotel, it's clear no one is more aware of his idiosyncracies than Anderson himself — and he's not apologizing.

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