mountaineering

Alpine Ascents International Monday released the name of the second company guide who was killed in this weekend’s climbing tragedy on Mount Rainier. His name was Eitan Green, a Colby College graduate from the Boston area. He was based in Seattle and had guided for Alpine Ascents since 2009.

Flickr Photo/Rupert Taylor-Price (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Sherpa senior guide Lakpa Rita Sherpa about the avalanche that killed five of his men on Mount Everest last Friday. Lakpa is also the leader of an expedition from Alpine Ascents International.

Sillman also talks with David Morton, a mountaineer who has started the Juniper Fund to help Sherpas who are injured or killed on the job.

The deadly avalanche on April 18 killed 16 men.

Monitors flash Kaji Sherpa's vital signs as he recovers in the ICU of Katmandu's Norvic International hospital. Miraculously, the 39-year-old senior climber survived the wall of deadly ice and snow that crushed 16 of his colleagues in the largest loss of life in a single day on Everest, the mountain Sherpas call "Mother Goddess of Earth."

The team had been preparing a path for their clients, fixing ropes on a treacherous stretch known as the "Popcorn" ice field, so-called for its bulging chunks of ice.

"There was a small hill" that acted as a buffer, Kaji says.

Courtesy Alpine Ascents International

Last Friday’s avalanche on Mount Everest was especially devastating for one Seattle-based mountaineering company.

Of the 16 Sherpa guides killed, five of them were employees of Alpine Ascents International.

Flickr Photo/Jack Brauer

Mountaineer Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner is the first woman to summit all 14 of the world’s 8,000-plus meter peaks without supplemental oxygen. This accomplishment came with a price. Her 2010 attempt to summit K2 — her last peak — ended when her good friend and partner slipped and fell to his death. A year later, she tried again and was rewarded with a view like she’d never imagined. She said, “I had the feeling that I was one with the universe." We’ll talk with National Geographic's 2012 explorer of the year.