Microsoft

Microsoft confirmed Tuesday that Satya Nadella, who has risen through the tech company's ranks since he joined it in 1992, is its new CEO.

Nadella has most recently been executive vice president of Microsoft's "cloud and enterprise" group.

While it's never been considered a "cool" company, Microsoft is still a force — worth $300 billion, and Windows operating systems still run on a big chunk of the world's computers. While the profile of founder and former CEO Bill Gates still looms large, outgoing leader Steve Ballmer took the reins in 2000. And Tuesday, the board chose an internal candidate — 46-year-old Indian-American engineer Satya Nadella — to head the company.

Wikipedia Photo/ Le Web Paris 2013 (CC BY)

Published reports have recently speculated that long-time Microsoft executive Satya Nadella is about to be named the company's new CEO.

But who is this man, and why is the Microsoft board of directors so interested in him?

KUOW's Lisa Brooks spoke with Geekwire co-founder Todd Bishop about Nadella and other rumors around Bill Gates' status as board chair.

Seattle Tops Denver In 'Startup Bowl'

Jan 27, 2014
Flickr Photo/UK Ministry of Defence

Steve Scher compares the strength of the technology communities in Colorado and Seattle with Todd Bishop of Geekwire.

Flickr Photo/Henry Alva (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde discusses with economics columnist Jon Talton Boeing and Microsoft's big decisions and how they will effect the Puget Sound economy in 2014.

Ross Reynolds talks with US Rep. Suzan DelBene, D-Wash., about a bill called the USA Freedom Act that would reign in government surveillance capabilities.

KUOW's Jamala Henderson attended a conference about encouraging young women to pursue careers in tech on Wednesday. Below are a collection of tweets -- many of them from Jamala -- that emerged from the conference. 

Microsoft store
Flickr Photo/Joe Wilcox (CC-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with Washington Post reporter Lydia DePillis about why internet giants are venturing into traditional brick and mortar.

Flickr Photo/Fabien Lavocat (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Dr. Tahira Probst about the controversial practice of "stack ranking" (which Microsoft announced it will do away with) and other employee evaluation methods. She is a professor of psychology and the interim Assistant Vice Chancellor Of Academic Affairs at Washington State University- Vancouver.

Flickr Photo/cheukiecfu (CC BY-NC-ND)

There was big news from our region’s tech giants this week: Microsoft's profits are up nearly 17 percent over the past year, and Amazon now has more than 110,000 employees — passing Microsoft for the first time ever.

Nick Wingfield covers technology for The New York Times. He talks with Marcie Sillman about the latest tech news coming out of Seattle.

Flickr Photo/Vernon Chan

Microsoft stock rose 6 percent after an earnings report that had analysts cheering. The Redmond, Wash.-based employer has been struggling to change as consumers move away from computers and toward mobile devices.

Flickr Photo/Vernon Chan

Microsoft servers around the world are dishing out a new version of Windows 8. The new version brings back a start button, something users said they missed.

A lot is riding on the success of the operating system, which is the backbone of Microsoft’s transformation into a devices company. It’s Microsoft’s effort to create a single experience for all Microsoft devices, from smartphone to tablet to laptop.

Bill Gates
(AP Photo/John Minchillo)

William Henry Gates III is an American business magnate, investor, programmer, inventor and philanthropist. You probably know him as Bill. He has done a few things, most notably, perhaps, building the software empire Microsoft. Although Bill Gates has stepped away from the daily operations at Microsoft, he’s still chairman of the board. And some influential Microsoft investors are calling for Gates to step down. That’s according to a story from Reuters Corporate Board Correspondent, Nadia Damouni.

KUOW Photo/Jake Warga

Technology companies have been among the bright spots for job growth in the region. They are hiring a lot of one particular kind of employee—software engineers. Those are the people who design, develop and test systems and software.

It’s Friday — time to talk over the week’s news with Joni Balter of the Seattle Times, The Stranger's Eli Sanders and Peter Jackson of the Everett Herald. This week President Obama said he'll ask Congress to approve a military strike against the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

 Governor Inslee floated the idea of another special legislative session to get a transportation package passed. Plus, Microsoft buys a $7.2 billion chunk of Nokia, Amazon's Jeff Bezos makes his first visit to the Washington Post as its newest owner and former president Bill Clinton tries to explain the Affordable Care Act to America. 

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