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Microsoft

America's business leaders are speaking out against President Trump's move to end DACA.

The president of Microsoft, Brad Smith, took a notable stand. He said not only will his company lobby for a legislative solution but also that Microsoft is calling on Congress to make immigration the top priority, before tax reform. And he is calling on other business leaders to follow suit.

With an assist from Microsoft, Washington state’s Department of Transportation has launched a feasibility study of bullet train service in Cascadia.

A previous attempt at providing broadband service through a public-private partnership fell apart in 2013.
Flickr Photo/Steve Rhode (CC BY-NC-ND)

Washington is one of the states that could benefit from Microsoft's new plan to boost broadband Internet access to rural communities.

Microsoft is announcing a new effort to connect more people to the Internet. Not people far away, in the so-called emerging markets — where other American tech giants have built Internet balloons and drones. Instead, Microsoft is focusing right here at home, on the 23.4 million people in rural America without broadband access.

Microsoft is trying to put the brakes on its greenhouse gas emissions.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

It’s rush hour in Wallingford, and commuters are stepping off a bus, closing up their laptops and heading into the evening sun. It’s not public transit. It’s a Microsoft Connector bus.

Canada Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, right, and Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee before a meeting Thursday, May 18, 2017, in Seattle. The two were to discuss trade, regional economic development, and climate.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

As Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau arrived in Seattle Wednesday, protesters rallied on the steps of the Canadian consulate downtown.

The Native and environmental activists were protesting pipelines Trudeau approved in November, including the Trans Mountain pipeline that would multiply oil tanker traffic through British Columbia and Washington waters up to sevenfold.

Microsoft has had a whirlwind last few days. The company's Windows operating system was the target of a massive cyberattack that took down hundreds of thousands of computers across 150 countries. While it's too soon to say the worst is over — there could be another wave — the president of the company does have two big takeaways.

One takeaway is sexy and edgy. The other is boring, plain vanilla — but no less important to Brad Smith, president of Microsoft.

When the National Security Agency lost control of the software behind the WannaCry cyberattack, it was like "the U.S. military having some of its Tomahawk missiles stolen," Microsoft President Brad Smith says, in a message about the malicious software that has created havoc on computer networks in more than 150 countries since Friday.

KUOW Photo/Andy Hurst

Last week President Trump signed an executive order that could bring significant changes to the H-1B visa program, which lets companies temporarily hire a limited number of foreign workers. Created in 1990, the program is popular among local tech companies, especially Microsoft.


Detta Hayes, 9 year driver for Microsoft's connector bus and vanpool service. Hayes is prone to frequent bursts of laughter, such as when I asked her if her bus ever gets stuck in traffic.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Chuck Collins is the guy who ran Metro in the 1970s.

He should be the kind of guy who salivates over light rail. But instead, he’s dreaming of more vanpools.

Will DNA molecules replace DVDs and flash drives?
Flickr Photo/Tom Woodward (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/7hTafL

In a  lab test tube at the University of Washington, scientists stored an HD video of the song “This Too Shall Pass” by OK Go on DNA molecules. They also stored the text of 100 books and the Declaration of Human Rights in multiple languages.

Now, they've broken their own record for the amount of media rich data they've encoded onto DNA.


Independent radio producer Brie Ripley.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Bill Radke asks independent radio producer and millennial Brie Ripley for help deciphering a slang-heavy invite from a Microsoft recruiter calling interns 'bae" for an event involving 'hella noms' and 'getting lit on a Monday night'. 

Britain's decision to leave the European Union is shaking investor confidence around the world. Stocks plunged, staged a minor rebound and then trailed downward as the uncertainty caused by the Brexit vote sunk in.


Todd Bishop does his best to explain LinkedIn to KUOW's Bill Radke.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Bill Radke talks to Geekwire's Todd Bishop about what Microsoft's $26.2 billion acquisition of LinkedIn means for the company and the region. "LinkedIn is to business what Facebook is to the rest of our lives," Bishop said. 

Microsoft is making a massive bet on professional social networking: It has reached an agreement to buy LinkedIn for $26.2 billion. The deal is the biggest ever for Microsoft and one of the largest for the tech industry.

What this represents is effectively a bet on a new kind of connected workplace, in what Microsoft calls the "productivity" industry. The companies hope to merge Microsoft's Office 365 and other business products with LinkedIn's professional social network.

Nokia Lumia Windows phone. microsoft
Flickr Photo/Vernon Chan (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/bWZ4L4

Kim Malcolm talks with Geekwire's Todd Bishop about why Microsoft is scaling back its smartphone business and laying off 1,850 employees.

Saying its customers "have a right to know when the government obtains a warrant to read their emails" — and that Microsoft has a right to tell them about gag orders — the tech giant has filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Justice Department.

Microsoft is asking a judge to declare part of a federal law, specifically 18 U.S.C. § 2705(b), unconstitutional under both the First and Fourth Amendments.

As NPR's Aarti Shahani reports for our Newscast unit:

Micrsoft technology
Flickr Photo/Fabien Lavocat (CC BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/6FfQtk

Bill Radke speaks with reporter Dina Bass about Microsoft's chat bot that (she says) will not lead to a new race of robot Terminators that try to destroy humans.  

Editor's note: This post contains language that some readers might find offensive.

Her emoji usage is on point. She says "bae," "chill" and "perf." She loves puppies, memes, and ... Adolf Hitler? Meet Tay, Microsoft's short-lived chatbot that was supposed to seem like your average millennial woman but was quickly corrupted by Internet trolling. She was launched Wednesday and shut down Thursday.

Microsoft sign on the company's Redmond, Washington campus.
Flickr Photo/Wonderlane (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1NM853Z

David Hyde speaks with Geekwire co-founder Todd Bishop about the top three tech stories in Seattle in 2015, including a revival at Microsoft, Amazon deliveries, and the murky story of the $70,000 wage at Gravity Payments.

Courtesy Washington Environmental Council

Microsoft is investing in 520 acres of forest land next to Mount Rainier National Park – but not to turn it into another corporate campus.

The software giant is trying to offset its carbon emissions by buying carbon credits.

Street sign on Microsoft campus in Redmond, Washington.
Flickr Photo/Todd A Bishop (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1MGSP5J

Bill Radke talks with University of Washington history professor Margaret O'Mara about the impact of Microsoft on the economy and culture of the Pacific Northwest.

Tim Porter and Matt McIlwain of Madrona Venture Group, a heavy funder of Seattle's cloud startups
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Seattle has become the center of a giant, invisible, global business, with Amazon and Microsoft as its core.

That business is the cloud, now estimated to be worth more than $15 billion to those two companies, which have become world leaders.

In this Sept. 10, 2014 file photo, detained immigrant children line up in the cafeteria at the Karnes County Residential Center in Texas. About 70 children from the border have been placed with foster families in Washington state.
AP Photo/Eric Gay

Expansion plans are underway for an immigration program linked to Microsoft, but it's something that has nothing to do with computers or technology.

It’s a non-profit called KIND, or Kids In Need of Defense, and it provides free attorneys to immigrant children who face deportation.

Seattle Seahawks' Marshawn Lynch watches the closing moments of an NFL football game against the Arizona Cardinals on Dec. 21, 2014.
AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin

Marcie Sillman speaks with GeekWire's Todd Bishop about a partnership between Microsoft and the NFL that, among other things, will allow fans access to data about players' on-field speed and distance.

Microsoft sign on the company's Redmond, Washington campus.
Flickr Photo/Wonderlane (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1NM853Z

Former and current employees are getting a letter from Microsoft this week.

It says no more Microsoft stock will be bought for the company’s 401k plan. The question is why.

Marcie Sillman speaks to Todd Bishop about what's new in Microsoft's Windows 10 operating system.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Jon Talton, economics columnist for The Seattle Times, about why the Washington State Legislature repealed a $57 million tax break for Microsoft.

Marcie Sillman speaks with technology journalist Todd Bishop about a leaked company-wide Microsoft memo that signals a new culture and direction for the company after a year of new CEO Satya Nadella's leadership.

Microsoft sign on the company's Redmond, Washington campus.
Flickr Photo/Wonderlane (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1NM853Z

David Hyde talks with University of Washington philosophy professor Michael Blake about the ethics of proposals by companies in this region -- like Microsoft -- to hire more foreign workers.

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