Microsoft

Nokia Lumia Windows phone. microsoft
Flickr Photo/Vernon Chan (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/bWZ4L4

Kim Malcolm talks with Geekwire's Todd Bishop about why Microsoft is scaling back its smartphone business and laying off 1,850 employees.

Saying its customers "have a right to know when the government obtains a warrant to read their emails" — and that Microsoft has a right to tell them about gag orders — the tech giant has filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Justice Department.

Microsoft is asking a judge to declare part of a federal law, specifically 18 U.S.C. § 2705(b), unconstitutional under both the First and Fourth Amendments.

As NPR's Aarti Shahani reports for our Newscast unit:

Micrsoft technology
Flickr Photo/Fabien Lavocat (CC BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/6FfQtk

Bill Radke speaks with reporter Dina Bass about Microsoft's chat bot that (she says) will not lead to a new race of robot Terminators that try to destroy humans.  

Editor's note: This post contains language that some readers might find offensive.

Her emoji usage is on point. She says "bae," "chill" and "perf." She loves puppies, memes, and ... Adolf Hitler? Meet Tay, Microsoft's short-lived chatbot that was supposed to seem like your average millennial woman but was quickly corrupted by Internet trolling. She was launched Wednesday and shut down Thursday.

Microsoft sign on the company's Redmond, Washington campus.
Flickr Photo/Wonderlane (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1NM853Z

David Hyde speaks with Geekwire co-founder Todd Bishop about the top three tech stories in Seattle in 2015, including a revival at Microsoft, Amazon deliveries, and the murky story of the $70,000 wage at Gravity Payments.

Courtesy Washington Environmental Council

Microsoft is investing in 520 acres of forest land next to Mount Rainier National Park – but not to turn it into another corporate campus.

The software giant is trying to offset its carbon emissions by buying carbon credits.

Street sign on Microsoft campus in Redmond, Washington.
Flickr Photo/Todd A Bishop (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1MGSP5J

Bill Radke talks with University of Washington history professor Margaret O'Mara about the impact of Microsoft on the economy and culture of the Pacific Northwest.

Tim Porter and Matt McIlwain of Madrona Venture Group, a heavy funder of Seattle's cloud startups
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Seattle has become the center of a giant, invisible, global business, with Amazon and Microsoft as its core.

That business is the cloud, now estimated to be worth more than $15 billion to those two companies, which have become world leaders.

In this Sept. 10, 2014 file photo, detained immigrant children line up in the cafeteria at the Karnes County Residential Center in Texas. About 70 children from the border have been placed with foster families in Washington state.
AP Photo/Eric Gay

Expansion plans are underway for an immigration program linked to Microsoft, but it's something that has nothing to do with computers or technology.

It’s a non-profit called KIND, or Kids In Need of Defense, and it provides free attorneys to immigrant children who face deportation.

Seattle Seahawks' Marshawn Lynch watches the closing moments of an NFL football game against the Arizona Cardinals on Dec. 21, 2014.
AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin

Marcie Sillman speaks with GeekWire's Todd Bishop about a partnership between Microsoft and the NFL that, among other things, will allow fans access to data about players' on-field speed and distance.

Microsoft sign on the company's Redmond, Washington campus.
Flickr Photo/Wonderlane (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1NM853Z

Former and current employees are getting a letter from Microsoft this week.

It says no more Microsoft stock will be bought for the company’s 401k plan. The question is why.

Marcie Sillman speaks to Todd Bishop about what's new in Microsoft's Windows 10 operating system.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Jon Talton, economics columnist for The Seattle Times, about why the Washington State Legislature repealed a $57 million tax break for Microsoft.

Marcie Sillman speaks with technology journalist Todd Bishop about a leaked company-wide Microsoft memo that signals a new culture and direction for the company after a year of new CEO Satya Nadella's leadership.

Microsoft sign on the company's Redmond, Washington campus.
Flickr Photo/Wonderlane (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1NM853Z

David Hyde talks with University of Washington philosophy professor Michael Blake about the ethics of proposals by companies in this region -- like Microsoft -- to hire more foreign workers.

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