mental health

Katherine Switz, founder of the Stability Network.
Courtesy of Katherine Switz

When a GermanWings passenger jet slammed into the French Alps last month, killing all aboard, attention focused on the co-pilot’s treatment for severe depression – and how he hid his illness.

An estimated 58 percent of Americans don’t want people with mental health issues in their workplace, even though a vast majority of people with such illnesses can work just fine.

The crash of Germanwings Flight 9525 into the French Alps earlier this week appears to have been a deliberate act carried out by a co-pilot.

It is too soon to put the label "suicide" on the co-pilot's actions. Not enough is known yet about his state of mind or what his motivation might have been. But as investigations continue, the incident raises questions about whether better mental health screening can prevent a person with suicidal tendencies from taking charge in the cockpit in the first place.

Participants at the 5th annual Compassion Research Day at Facebook's headquarters in Menlo Park, California. Facebook unveiled new tools on Feb. 25 to help prevent suicide.
Courtesy of Forefront/Katie Simmons

Marcie Sillman talks with Jennifer Stuber, director of Forefront, a suicide prevention organization at the University of Washington, about their partnership with Facebook.

Also, we hear from Stephen Miller, Forefront's operation's manager, about his own experience with Facebook and suicide. 

Our guest on this episode of Speakers Forum is David J. Morris, a war correspondent, former Marine and PTSD sufferer.

Morris served as a lieutenant in the Marine Corps in the 1990s, but did not see combat then. He went on to work as an embedded journalist in Iraq and Afghanistan. In 2004 he was nearly killed when a Humvee he was riding in hit an IED.

Mental health is one of the top issues in the Washington legislature this year. Several measures cleared the Washington House Monday in advance of a Wednesday cut-off deadline.

Marcie Sillman talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about Joel's Law, the legislative proposal that would allow families to petition a court to have a loved one involuntarily committed to a mental hospital.

Sillman also talks with David Johnson, CEO of Navos, a Seattle-based mental health service provider.

For the first time, the Washington state Senate has passed a version of “Joel’s Law.”

This past weekend, when I visited my mother in her assisted living home as I do once or twice a week, I brought along a present. That's not unusual: She and I share a craving for chocolate, and I often bring her new varieties of dark chocolate, her favorite, and other little gifts from my travels.

Mental health advocates in Washington are assailing a proposal to allow psychiatric boarding in limited cases.

A listener emailed us this picture of a recovering Blitz on Monday after the Seahawks lost in Super Bowl XLIX.
Courtesy of Michael James Hawk

Ross Reynolds talks to Dr. Kirk Honda, family therapist and faculty member at Antioch University, about how to manage the feeling of loss and grief after the Seattle Seahawks lost to the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XLIX.

A poster at Rainier Beach High School's teen clinic lets students know they have a safe place to talk.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

It used to be that students went to their school clinic to have their sore throat checked or get a vaccine. But many kids today have needs that go beyond physical health, whether it’s dealing with exposure to violence or having suicidal thoughts.

In response, a growing number of schools have started offering mental health services.

Washington state capitol
Flickr Photo/Alan Cordova (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with KUOW's Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about one of the legislature's priorities this session: mental health. 

The father of a Spokane woman shot to death by her husband in a murder-suicide is pushing for expanded mental health laws in Washington.

Courtesy of Deepali

Living with mental illness is never easy, no matter where in the world you live. But it can be particularly hard in India, and even more so if you’re a woman.

For Deepali, a 46-year-old yoga teacher in New Delhi, the problems began about 10 or 12 years ago. “There were financial troubles, there were definite marital troubles,” she says.

Mural near the Fisherman's Cove Marina and Lummi Island Ferry on Lummi Nation.
KUOW Photo/Jeff Emtman

After a visit to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Nation in North Dakota, President Barack Obama announced an initiative to help Native American youth.

Obama's proposal aims to provide culturally appropriate education at tribal schools, access to mental health providers and peer counseling and better preparation for college and careers. KUOW’s Jeannie Yandel spoke with Gyasi Ross, a writer, attorney and member of the Blackfeet tribe. He lives on the Suquamish reservation north of Seattle.

“You can see it in Obama's face, you can hear it in the words that he speaks -- he actually has a passion for trying to do something proactively for Native people," Ross said. "I knew that it was coming from a good place.”

Pages