media and journalism | KUOW News and Information

media and journalism

New Parent Company Could Mean Changes For KING TV

Jun 14, 2013

Two Seattle television news stations, KING and KONG, are being bought by the Virginia-based Gannett Company, which currently owns USA Today and dozens of local news stations across the country. What will this mean for KING5’s news reporting? And what does this corporate power shift say about the national trends in local news media? David Hyde talks to Rick Edmonds of the Poynter Institude about Gannett’s news reporting reputation.

Here to tell us more about KING TV’s new parent company is Rick Edmonds. He’s a media business analyst for the Poynter Institue, which is a Florida-based journalism school.

Overheard In The Green Room: Monica Guzman

Apr 25, 2013
KUOW Photo/Amber Cortes

Monica Guzman is a columnist for The Seattle Times and Northwest tech news site GeekWire. I caught up with her in the KUOW green room before her interview with Ross Reynolds to talk about the latest tech goodies on her radar and in her smartphone, her new vlog, and what she does to get away from it all.

Political Activity Skyrockets On Social Media

Apr 25, 2013
Flickr Photo/Maryland GovPics

Nearly 40 percent of Americans engaged in political activity on social networking sites like Facebook or Twitter in the 2012 campaign.  That’s a dramatic increase from 2008 when only 26 percent of the population even used a social networking site, according to a new study by the Pew Research Center.  KUOW’s Ross Reynolds takes a closer look at the new study with Pew researcher Aaron Smith.

Boston Marathon Bombings: The Social Media Manhunt

Apr 22, 2013
Twitter Image/Boston Police Department

Professional and citizen journalists turned to social media last week to report and gather information on the bombings in Boston. But in the rush to get the latest news out, rumors and misinformation ran rampant. KUOW’s Ross Reynolds spoke with Seattle Times technology columnist Mónica Guzmán about how to avoid making social media mistakes when breaking news happens.

News From Olympia, David Stockman, Covering Breaking News

Apr 22, 2013
Washington State Capitol
Flickr Photo/Alan Cordova (CC-BY-NC-ND)

This Week In Olympia
The legislative session is almost over but lots of issues remain unresolved. Education funding is still up in the air, so is an agreement on a balanced budget.  Jerry Cornfield, reporter and political columnist for the Everett Herald is waiting for answers along with the rest of us.
 

David Stockman Takes The American Economy To The Woodshed
In 1985,  federal budget Director David Stockman was sharply rebuked by his boss, Ronald Reagan, for saying the president’s tax programs were trickle-down programs to help the rich. These days, author David Stockman is taking Ben Bernanke, Wall Street Banks and the Obama administration to the woodshed for printing money, running deficits and leaving the gold standard.
 

The Media’s Boston Bomber Frenzy
CNN went on the air with misinformation about the imminent arrest of suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings. The front page of the New York Post identified the wrong men as suspects. Should audiences have any expectations for factual reporting during these fast moving stories? 

DC Update, Media & History, Interfaith Amigos

Apr 22, 2013

The Washington, DC: Week In Review
What was it like to work in Washington, DC, last week? Lawmakers rejected all the gun control proposals despite testimony from Newtown parents. President Obama expressed his disappointment, calling it a "shameful day" for the country. Add to that, the contaminated letters and awful bombing in Boston. CBS News producer Jill Jackson brings us a week in review.

How Media Shapes History
Thousands of years ago, the development of writing gave power to writers. Today, the computer gives power to coders. William Bernstein chronicles the impacts technology has on human communication from its origins in Mesopotamia to our 21st century global society in his book, “Masters of the Word: How Media Shaped History.”

Interfaith Amigos: Ancient Texts In A Modern World
The Bible, the Torah and the Quran are ancient religious texts written for an ancient audience.  How do we adapt ancient teachings to a modern world? The Interfaith Amigos share their views.

Is The KOMO Sale An 'Oh No!' Sale?

Apr 12, 2013

Seattle TV and Radio is about to experience some big changes. Yesterday the Sinclair Broadcast Group announced that it was buying Seattle-based Fisher Communications for about $373 million. Fisher owns 20 television stations including KOMO in Seattle, and four Fisher radio stations in Seattle, including KOMO. Other stations include KIMA and KEPR in Yakima and the Tri-Cities, KATU in Portland, KVAL in Eugene and KBOI in Boise. Ross Reynolds gets the skinny on Sinclair from Northwestern University professor Dan Kennedy.

Flickr Photo/Oran Viriyincy

The Seattle Times announced this week that they would be instituting a pay wall, meaning that online readers will soon have a limited amount of free access to the website. Ross Reynolds talks with Seattle Times Executive Editor David Boardman about the soon-to-be-implemented pay wall, and what he thinks of a Washington bill that would impose limits on public-records requests.

Alexio's pics / Flickr

Journalist Jon Ronson has interviewed a wide array of interesting characters, ranging from the hip-hop duo, Insane Clown Posse, to a man who tried to split the atom in his kitchen. Ronson is the bestselling author of "The Psychopath Test" and "The Men Who Stare at Goats."

Ross talks to him about his new book, "Lost at Sea," where he discusses his journalistic endeavors and demonstrates just how intriguing the human race can be, for example, local vigilante Phoenix Jones.

The Rise Of KUOW And Public Radio In Seattle

Jan 25, 2013
Group Health

KUOW recently began its seventh decade on the air in Seattle. All this week we’ve been looking back at the history of radio in the Puget Sound Region. Today, Feliks Banel explores how local public radio has evolved over that last 30 years as a result of changes in commercial radio and the rise of national programming.

The Early Years Of KUOW

Jan 24, 2013
University of Washington archives

KUOW recently began its seventh decade on the air in Seattle.  In the second installment of a three-part series exploring the history of KUOW, Feliks Banel takes us back to the station’s early years before pledge drives and NPR, and then on to the rise of public radio in the 1970s.

under_volcano / Flickr

There may soon be eight new FM radio station licenses available in Western Washington, and you can apply for one. The FCC announced that it is allowing nonprofits, educational institutions, tribal nations and more to apply for low-frequency licenses. Today Ross talks to Sabrina Roach, a veteran of KUOW and KBCS. She’s on the steering committee for a Digital Inclusion Summit currently in the works.

The Golden Years Of Radio In Seattle

Jan 23, 2013
Courtesy of MOHAI

It’s been more than 60 years since KUOW first went on the air in Seattle, but local radio history goes back a bit further than that.  In the first installment of a three part series, Feliks Banel has the story of what radio sounded like around here in the years before KUOW.

For 30 years, Steve Kelley has been cranking out sports columns for The Seattle Times. But now, at age 63, Kelley says he’s leaving the journalism game to pursue other interests. Ross Reynolds sits down with Steve Kelly to talk Sonics, Seattle sports and what he plans on doing next.

Mental illness
Flickr illustration/madamepsychosis

Tragic and unexplainable acts of violence are often attributed to mental illness. In the aftermath of terrible tragedies, like the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, anecdotal and unconfirmed stories of mental illness begin to circulate.

Dr. Jennifer Stuber from UW’s School of Social Work visited Weekday to discuss the link between violence and mental illness and particularly how the media plays a part in the dissemination of misinformation. Below are highlights from her interview.

Author's LinkedIn Profile

What happens when the demand for profit by media companies drives news coverage? Seattle reporter Claudia Rowe joins Ross Reynolds to talk about the changing landscape of journalism in 2012. She’s been in journalism for more than 20 years, writing most recently for The New York Times and the Seattle Post-Intelligencer.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Glenn Greenwald is a columnist on civil liberties and US national security issues for the Guardian. A former constitutional lawyer, he has written for Salon and is the author of three books, "How Would a Patriot Act?" a critique of the Bush administration's use of executive power; "A Tragic Legacy," which examines the Bush legacy; and "With Liberty and Justice For Some: How the Law Is Used to Destroy Equality and Protect the Powerful."

Alex Alben
Yoyostring Media

Former RealNetworks executive Alex Alben says digital technology is leading to more connection and more alienation.  Alben talks to Ross Reynolds about what the rise of digital technology means for the future of America. 

Ira Glass On The Future Of Radio

Oct 4, 2012
(AP Photo/Showtime, Monty Brinton)

With NPR’s popular Car Talk hosts retiring, public radio approaches a crossroads. Which way to go? Hit the archives to keep popular programs on the air, or create more new shows? The creator and host of This American Life has some ideas. We talk with Ira Glass about the present and future of public radio.

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