media and journalism | KUOW News and Information

media and journalism

Tavi-In-Chief: 'You Can Be A Feminist And Also Like Stuff'

Jan 14, 2014
Flickr Photo/roniweb

There are a lot of stereotypical images of teenage girls: vain, ditzy, obsessed with pop music. Tavi Gevinson makes it her job to break these stereotypes. As she sees it, "A lot of teenage girls are very articulate and maybe they like Taylor Swift and One Direction, but that doesn’t mean that they aren’t also smart and strong.”

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Sharks in Western Australia are now tweeting out where they are — in a way.

Government researchers have tagged 338 sharks with acoustic transmitters that monitor where the animals are. When a tagged shark is about half a mile away from a beach, it triggers a computer alert, which tweets out a message on the Surf Life Saving Western Australia Twitter feed. The tweet notes the shark's size, breed and approximate location.

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Editor’s Note: This story has been changed to strengthen its focus on student data privacy. The original version, which contained more specifics from an agreement between the state schools office and The Seattle Times, left some of our readers mistakenly believing that their children’s names and Social Security numbers had been released to the Times. While the story did not say that, we want to remove any doubts. The agreement can be viewed below.

KUOW has learned that the Washington state education department has signed agreements to share non-public student data with media organizations including The Seattle Times and The Associated Press.

Flickr Photo/Boston Public Library

David Hyde talks with Kenny Irby of the Poynter Institute for Media Studies about a confrontation between national media and the White House over a policy that shuts photographers out of some presidential events.

David Folkenflik's book "Murdoch's World."

David Hyde speaks with NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik about his book “Murdoch’s World: The Last of the Old Media Empires.”

The FCC is currently accepting applications for new low-power FM radio stations. The Record's Marcie Sillman speaks with Sabrina Roach of Brown Paper Tickets about what groups are applying for licenses.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

David Hyde speaks with Voice of Vashon co-founder Susan McCabe. The online radio station is applying for a new low-power FM station.

Community Radio Enters The Supernatural With "Welcome To Night Vale"

Oct 31, 2013
Flickr Photo/Rowan

Steve Scher talks with Joseph Fink and Jeffrey Cranor, the creators of a podcast that centers around a small desert town where many strange and unusual events occur: Welcome To Night Vale.

That's Not What The Fox Says. It Goes Wow-Wow

Oct 23, 2013
Flickr Photo/US National Archives

"What does the fox say?" — the viral video in which a child’s barnyard sounds book goes “Gangnam Style” — has spurred many parodies,  including one from longtime local drive time show, Bob Rivers on KJR. Their Twisted Tunes team spun the tune into a pep rally ditty for the Seattle Seahawks.

This inspired KUOW host Bill Radke to ponder — and answer — the cosmic question himself. Play the audio clip to find out exactly what a fox says.

Courtesy of StoryCorps

When Dave Isay first launched the StoryCorps project – an independent archive of interviews between two people – nobody wanted to participate. StoryCorps staff at Grand Central Station would have to grab commuters and convince them to come into the tiny recording booth to share their stories.

The Record’s Ross Reynolds interviews Thomas Patterson, a professor of government and the press at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, whose new book is Informing the News: The Need for Knowledge-Based Journalism. The book began as a look at what journalism schools need to do to train the new generation of reporters.

Flickr Photo/clappstar

The Seattle Police Department has had a difficult couple of years. A strongly critical Department of Justice report found widespread excessive use of force. A federal judge is now overseeing a plan to fix the problem. 

But one bright spot in the media has been the police presence on the web and social media. Contrary to what you might expect, SPD's blog is pretty entertaining. For example one web post, MarijWhatNow, about how Seattle police would deal with legalized marijuana, drew worldwide attention and earned the "best new thing in the world today" title from the Rachel Maddow Show.

Should Parents Post Baby Pics Online?

Sep 11, 2013
Michael Clinard

We’ve all seen them: cute baby pictures in our Facebook, Instagram or Twitter feeds. For many parents, it’s hard to resist the temptation to share just how adorable their kid looks in their first rain boots or winter hat. But some are saying parents should pause before hitting that "share" button. Marcie Sillman talks with Amy Webb about why she doesn’t post anything about her daughter online.

Correction 9/9/2013: A previous version of this story said this year would be the first time that the Federal Communications Commission would issue low-power licenses in urban areas. The FCC started issuing these licenses under a program that launched in 2000. Also, the original version of this story said the community meeting would be held on Friday, 9/6. That is also inaccurate, the meeting will be held Monday 9/9/13. We regret the errors. 

A group in Ballard is meeting Friday to discuss plans for a low-power FM radio station — a small-scale station that broadcasts in a radius of about three miles.

Biographies In The Age Of Email

Aug 7, 2013
Flickr Photo/pennstatenews

For centuries, biographers relied on handwritten letters to bring historical figures to life, from Ghandi to Catherine The Great. But email, texts and Outlook have changed how historians work. For example, we know from emails how Microsoft executives reacted to Apple’s early success with iTunes: “We were smoked.”

Full list of stories from KUOW Presents, August 7:

What Should Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos Do With The Washington Post?

Aug 6, 2013
Flickr Photo/Adam Glanzman

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announced plans to buy the Washington Post for $250 million yesterday. The news came as a shock to most of the media. But former journalist-turned-Silicon-Valley-CEO Alan Mutter says it may be the best move for an ailing industry. Ross Reynolds asks Alan why.

The Washington Post Co. will sell its flagship newspaper and one of the most respected news organizations in the country to Amazon.com founder Jeffrey P. Bezos, the company announced in a press release. The Post has been a family-owned business for four generations.

Amazon, the company said, will play no role in the purchase. Bezos is making the purchase personally.

Seattle Times Editor Departing For Dean Position

Aug 1, 2013
Flickr Photo/European Citizen

In this era of digital media David Boardman, the departing executive editor of the Seattle Times, said he sees a great future ahead for newspapers.

Diary of A Bad Year: A War Correspondent's Dilemma

Jul 29, 2013
Glen Carey, courtesy of PRX

Kelly McEvers covers wars for NPR. She's driven partly by altruism, and partly by a feeling much less noble. There's something intoxicating about finding oneself in life-and-death situations. It's not something McEvers is proud of, especially when she thinks of her young child at home. Today, we begin a journey with McEvers - an introspective journey in which the war correspondent examines herself. 

Full list of stories on KUOW Presents, July 29:

What's InvestigateWest Up To?

Jun 26, 2013

 The Seattle Post-Intelligencer served the community with a print edition for more than 140 years. When the newspaper shut off the presses in 2009, a group of reporters formed the investigate journalism website InvestigateWest. One of the goals of the nonprofit is to “set the policy agenda through powerful, independent journalism.” Are they doing it? Jason Alcorn is InvestigateWest's associate director. He talked with David Hyde about what their journalists are digging into.

New Parent Company Could Mean Changes For KING TV

Jun 14, 2013

Two Seattle television news stations, KING and KONG, are being bought by the Virginia-based Gannett Company, which currently owns USA Today and dozens of local news stations across the country. What will this mean for KING5’s news reporting? And what does this corporate power shift say about the national trends in local news media? David Hyde talks to Rick Edmonds of the Poynter Institude about Gannett’s news reporting reputation.

Here to tell us more about KING TV’s new parent company is Rick Edmonds. He’s a media business analyst for the Poynter Institue, which is a Florida-based journalism school.

Overheard In The Green Room: Monica Guzman

Apr 25, 2013
KUOW Photo/Amber Cortes

Monica Guzman is a columnist for The Seattle Times and Northwest tech news site GeekWire. I caught up with her in the KUOW green room before her interview with Ross Reynolds to talk about the latest tech goodies on her radar and in her smartphone, her new vlog, and what she does to get away from it all.

Political Activity Skyrockets On Social Media

Apr 25, 2013
Flickr Photo/Maryland GovPics

Nearly 40 percent of Americans engaged in political activity on social networking sites like Facebook or Twitter in the 2012 campaign.  That’s a dramatic increase from 2008 when only 26 percent of the population even used a social networking site, according to a new study by the Pew Research Center.  KUOW’s Ross Reynolds takes a closer look at the new study with Pew researcher Aaron Smith.

Boston Marathon Bombings: The Social Media Manhunt

Apr 22, 2013
Twitter Image/Boston Police Department

Professional and citizen journalists turned to social media last week to report and gather information on the bombings in Boston. But in the rush to get the latest news out, rumors and misinformation ran rampant. KUOW’s Ross Reynolds spoke with Seattle Times technology columnist Mónica Guzmán about how to avoid making social media mistakes when breaking news happens.

News From Olympia, David Stockman, Covering Breaking News

Apr 22, 2013
Washington State Capitol
Flickr Photo/Alan Cordova (CC-BY-NC-ND)

This Week In Olympia
The legislative session is almost over but lots of issues remain unresolved. Education funding is still up in the air, so is an agreement on a balanced budget.  Jerry Cornfield, reporter and political columnist for the Everett Herald is waiting for answers along with the rest of us.
 

David Stockman Takes The American Economy To The Woodshed
In 1985,  federal budget Director David Stockman was sharply rebuked by his boss, Ronald Reagan, for saying the president’s tax programs were trickle-down programs to help the rich. These days, author David Stockman is taking Ben Bernanke, Wall Street Banks and the Obama administration to the woodshed for printing money, running deficits and leaving the gold standard.
 

The Media’s Boston Bomber Frenzy
CNN went on the air with misinformation about the imminent arrest of suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings. The front page of the New York Post identified the wrong men as suspects. Should audiences have any expectations for factual reporting during these fast moving stories? 

DC Update, Media & History, Interfaith Amigos

Apr 22, 2013

The Washington, DC: Week In Review
What was it like to work in Washington, DC, last week? Lawmakers rejected all the gun control proposals despite testimony from Newtown parents. President Obama expressed his disappointment, calling it a "shameful day" for the country. Add to that, the contaminated letters and awful bombing in Boston. CBS News producer Jill Jackson brings us a week in review.

How Media Shapes History
Thousands of years ago, the development of writing gave power to writers. Today, the computer gives power to coders. William Bernstein chronicles the impacts technology has on human communication from its origins in Mesopotamia to our 21st century global society in his book, “Masters of the Word: How Media Shaped History.”

Interfaith Amigos: Ancient Texts In A Modern World
The Bible, the Torah and the Quran are ancient religious texts written for an ancient audience.  How do we adapt ancient teachings to a modern world? The Interfaith Amigos share their views.

Is The KOMO Sale An 'Oh No!' Sale?

Apr 12, 2013

Seattle TV and Radio is about to experience some big changes. Yesterday the Sinclair Broadcast Group announced that it was buying Seattle-based Fisher Communications for about $373 million. Fisher owns 20 television stations including KOMO in Seattle, and four Fisher radio stations in Seattle, including KOMO. Other stations include KIMA and KEPR in Yakima and the Tri-Cities, KATU in Portland, KVAL in Eugene and KBOI in Boise. Ross Reynolds gets the skinny on Sinclair from Northwestern University professor Dan Kennedy.

Flickr Photo/Oran Viriyincy

The Seattle Times announced this week that they would be instituting a pay wall, meaning that online readers will soon have a limited amount of free access to the website. Ross Reynolds talks with Seattle Times Executive Editor David Boardman about the soon-to-be-implemented pay wall, and what he thinks of a Washington bill that would impose limits on public-records requests.

Alexio's pics / Flickr

Journalist Jon Ronson has interviewed a wide array of interesting characters, ranging from the hip-hop duo, Insane Clown Posse, to a man who tried to split the atom in his kitchen. Ronson is the bestselling author of "The Psychopath Test" and "The Men Who Stare at Goats."

Ross talks to him about his new book, "Lost at Sea," where he discusses his journalistic endeavors and demonstrates just how intriguing the human race can be, for example, local vigilante Phoenix Jones.

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