media and journalism | KUOW News and Information

media and journalism

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When the Americans entered World War II in 1944, reporters joined their ranks. Women, however, were not allowed.

Flickr Photo/Ricky Montalvo (Cc-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Ira Glass, host of This American Life, about his career and the art of radio storytelling.

Flickr Photo/Jason Howie (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with Seattle author Maria Semple about why she thinks social media is the biggest threat to writing and art since Peter Criss' first solo album.

From Wikipedia

It’s no secret that radio in the early days was a man’s game. Men were the directors, the producers, the composers and the sound effect technicians. But it was a woman who was a major influence in the sound effects profession.

Alain de Botton's book "The News."

Marcie Sillman talks with Alain de Botton about his latest book on modern philosophy and life, "The News: A User's Manual."

Flickr Photo/West McGowan (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with UCLA professor Sean Young about his new study that links language used in tweets with high rates of HIV infection.

This post was updated at 10:30 a.m. ET on March 6.

Facebook said Wednesday that it will limit minors' access to pages and posts that offer firearms for sale, along with other measures intended to curtail illegal gun trafficking.

"This is something we've been working on for a while," says Facebook spokesman Matt Steinfeld. "We want to balance the interests of people who come here to express themselves while promoting an environment that is safe and respectful."

For most of us, our smartphones have become our figurative lifelines. For state troopers their literal lifeline is still the two-way radio.

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

The Seattle Seahawks booked their ticket to the Super Bowl by winning the NFC Championship on Sunday, but not without some controversy.

When Erin Andrews of Fox Sports grabbed Seattle cornerback Richard Sherman for a post-game interview, he looked right into the camera and said, “I’m the best corner in the game and when you try me against a sorry receiver like Crabtree that’s the results you going to get.”

Tavi-In-Chief: 'You Can Be A Feminist And Also Like Stuff'

Jan 14, 2014
Flickr Photo/roniweb

There are a lot of stereotypical images of teenage girls: vain, ditzy, obsessed with pop music. Tavi Gevinson makes it her job to break these stereotypes. As she sees it, "A lot of teenage girls are very articulate and maybe they like Taylor Swift and One Direction, but that doesn’t mean that they aren’t also smart and strong.”

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Finally today, we want to take a look at the world of Internet media. Now we often hear that the Internet is the brave new world where things like race and gender don't matter. Everybody can be who they want to be and have equal access and equal say. But we also know that there is an ugly side to the Internet, and that's something you may have experienced yourself, particularly if you are a girl or a woman.

Sharks in Western Australia are now tweeting out where they are — in a way.

Government researchers have tagged 338 sharks with acoustic transmitters that monitor where the animals are. When a tagged shark is about half a mile away from a beach, it triggers a computer alert, which tweets out a message on the Surf Life Saving Western Australia Twitter feed. The tweet notes the shark's size, breed and approximate location.

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Editor’s Note: This story has been changed to strengthen its focus on student data privacy. The original version, which contained more specifics from an agreement between the state schools office and The Seattle Times, left some of our readers mistakenly believing that their children’s names and Social Security numbers had been released to the Times. While the story did not say that, we want to remove any doubts. The agreement can be viewed below.

KUOW has learned that the Washington state education department has signed agreements to share non-public student data with media organizations including The Seattle Times and The Associated Press.

Flickr Photo/Boston Public Library

David Hyde talks with Kenny Irby of the Poynter Institute for Media Studies about a confrontation between national media and the White House over a policy that shuts photographers out of some presidential events.

David Folkenflik's book "Murdoch's World."

David Hyde speaks with NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik about his book “Murdoch’s World: The Last of the Old Media Empires.”

The FCC is currently accepting applications for new low-power FM radio stations. The Record's Marcie Sillman speaks with Sabrina Roach of Brown Paper Tickets about what groups are applying for licenses.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

David Hyde speaks with Voice of Vashon co-founder Susan McCabe. The online radio station is applying for a new low-power FM station.

Community Radio Enters The Supernatural With "Welcome To Night Vale"

Oct 31, 2013
Flickr Photo/Rowan

Steve Scher talks with Joseph Fink and Jeffrey Cranor, the creators of a podcast that centers around a small desert town where many strange and unusual events occur: Welcome To Night Vale.

That's Not What The Fox Says. It Goes Wow-Wow

Oct 23, 2013
Flickr Photo/US National Archives

"What does the fox say?" — the viral video in which a child’s barnyard sounds book goes “Gangnam Style” — has spurred many parodies,  including one from longtime local drive time show, Bob Rivers on KJR. Their Twisted Tunes team spun the tune into a pep rally ditty for the Seattle Seahawks.

This inspired KUOW host Bill Radke to ponder — and answer — the cosmic question himself. Play the audio clip to find out exactly what a fox says.

Courtesy of StoryCorps

When Dave Isay first launched the StoryCorps project – an independent archive of interviews between two people – nobody wanted to participate. StoryCorps staff at Grand Central Station would have to grab commuters and convince them to come into the tiny recording booth to share their stories.

The Record’s Ross Reynolds interviews Thomas Patterson, a professor of government and the press at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, whose new book is Informing the News: The Need for Knowledge-Based Journalism. The book began as a look at what journalism schools need to do to train the new generation of reporters.

Flickr Photo/clappstar

The Seattle Police Department has had a difficult couple of years. A strongly critical Department of Justice report found widespread excessive use of force. A federal judge is now overseeing a plan to fix the problem. 

But one bright spot in the media has been the police presence on the web and social media. Contrary to what you might expect, SPD's blog is pretty entertaining. For example one web post, MarijWhatNow, about how Seattle police would deal with legalized marijuana, drew worldwide attention and earned the "best new thing in the world today" title from the Rachel Maddow Show.

Should Parents Post Baby Pics Online?

Sep 11, 2013
Michael Clinard

We’ve all seen them: cute baby pictures in our Facebook, Instagram or Twitter feeds. For many parents, it’s hard to resist the temptation to share just how adorable their kid looks in their first rain boots or winter hat. But some are saying parents should pause before hitting that "share" button. Marcie Sillman talks with Amy Webb about why she doesn’t post anything about her daughter online.

Correction 9/9/2013: A previous version of this story said this year would be the first time that the Federal Communications Commission would issue low-power licenses in urban areas. The FCC started issuing these licenses under a program that launched in 2000. Also, the original version of this story said the community meeting would be held on Friday, 9/6. That is also inaccurate, the meeting will be held Monday 9/9/13. We regret the errors. 

A group in Ballard is meeting Friday to discuss plans for a low-power FM radio station — a small-scale station that broadcasts in a radius of about three miles.

Biographies In The Age Of Email

Aug 7, 2013
Flickr Photo/pennstatenews

For centuries, biographers relied on handwritten letters to bring historical figures to life, from Ghandi to Catherine The Great. But email, texts and Outlook have changed how historians work. For example, we know from emails how Microsoft executives reacted to Apple’s early success with iTunes: “We were smoked.”

Full list of stories from KUOW Presents, August 7:

What Should Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos Do With The Washington Post?

Aug 6, 2013
Flickr Photo/Adam Glanzman

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announced plans to buy the Washington Post for $250 million yesterday. The news came as a shock to most of the media. But former journalist-turned-Silicon-Valley-CEO Alan Mutter says it may be the best move for an ailing industry. Ross Reynolds asks Alan why.

The Washington Post Co. will sell its flagship newspaper and one of the most respected news organizations in the country to Amazon.com founder Jeffrey P. Bezos, the company announced in a press release. The Post has been a family-owned business for four generations.

Amazon, the company said, will play no role in the purchase. Bezos is making the purchase personally.

Seattle Times Editor Departing For Dean Position

Aug 1, 2013
Flickr Photo/European Citizen

In this era of digital media David Boardman, the departing executive editor of the Seattle Times, said he sees a great future ahead for newspapers.

Diary of A Bad Year: A War Correspondent's Dilemma

Jul 29, 2013
Glen Carey, courtesy of PRX

Kelly McEvers covers wars for NPR. She's driven partly by altruism, and partly by a feeling much less noble. There's something intoxicating about finding oneself in life-and-death situations. It's not something McEvers is proud of, especially when she thinks of her young child at home. Today, we begin a journey with McEvers - an introspective journey in which the war correspondent examines herself. 

Full list of stories on KUOW Presents, July 29:

What's InvestigateWest Up To?

Jun 26, 2013

 The Seattle Post-Intelligencer served the community with a print edition for more than 140 years. When the newspaper shut off the presses in 2009, a group of reporters formed the investigate journalism website InvestigateWest. One of the goals of the nonprofit is to “set the policy agenda through powerful, independent journalism.” Are they doing it? Jason Alcorn is InvestigateWest's associate director. He talked with David Hyde about what their journalists are digging into.

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