media and journalism | KUOW News and Information

media and journalism

Street Newspapers On The Rise In The Northwest

Nov 14, 2014

In every major West Coast city, people who are homeless or living in transitional housing are selling street newspapers on the corners.

Balloons and flowers at an impromptu memorial at Marysville Pilchuck High School the Monday after a school shooting on Friday, Oct. 24.
KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

Jeannie Yandel talks with journalist Dave Cullen, the author of the book "Columbine," about how he saw false explanations for the Columbine shooting affect national policy, and why he urges media and friends of Marysville community members alike to take their time trying to work through the causes of the shooting.

At most news organizations, journalists celebrate when they get a story in print, on air or online.

At Storyful, editors high-five when they knock a story down.

"We like to think about [Storyful] as the first social news agency," said Mark Little, the company's buoyant CEO. A former television news anchor and correspondent in his native Ireland, Little conceived the company in 2009 after watching the documentation of mounting protests in Iran posted to Flickr and YouTube.

Facebook

Within hours of the school shooting in Marysville that left two students dead – including the shooter – Seattle venture capitalist Nick Hanauer posted a link to a story about the shooting with this caption: “We need more school shootings!!! Vote yes on Initiative 591.”

In the aftermath of disasters like earthquakes, fires and severe weather events, the rush to both alert and check on family and friends can crash telecommunications networks. During the freak 2011 Virginia earthquake, which rattled the nation's capital and damaged the Washington Monument, panicked phone calls quickly overloaded the phone network.

Facebook's newest tool, known as Safety Check, aims to allow people to quickly alert friends and family that they are safe after a natural disaster.

Hong Kong media are providing wall-to-wall coverage of the protests calling for the resignation of Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying, but in mainland China there has been little to no mention of the unrest.

The contrast is an illustration of the "one country, two systems" policy that has been in place since the former British colony reverted to Chinese rule in 1997.

Vermont is known for its green pastures, farmsteads and roads free of billboards. The founders of the new social network Ello live in the state, and they want to bring Vermont-like serenity to the Internet.

"We set out to prove that a social network will survive and thrive that doesn't have a business model of selling ads to its users," says CEO and co-founder Paul Budnitz.

The U.S. Forest Service is developing a rule that would let it decide whether the media could film or take photos in wilderness areas.

Talk about a take-this-job and shove it moment: During last night's local news broadcast, a reporter for KTVA-TV in Alaska did two pretty stunning things.

First, after reporting on the efforts of the Alaska Cannabis Club, Charlo Greene revealed she was the club's owner. And then, realizing the kind of ethical dilemma that put her in, she quit on live television.

Flickr Photo/Jo Morrill (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Leonard Garfield, director of the Museum of History and Industry, about MOHAI's efforts to find a new home for the landmark P-I globe.

For more than 40 years, a radio station called the “Evergreen Radio Reading Service” has been broadcasting all day, everyday across Washington State for the "print disabled" -- people who are visually impaired or unable to hold or turn a page.

This week, we’ll be examining Washington's freshest crop - marijuana. The agriculture, the security and the personalities.

Screenshot by Keva Andersen

The subject headline of producer Matthew Streib's email was irresistibly public radio: "There is fresh raw Nigerian pygmy goat's milk in the fridge." 

Typically we hear about free doughnuts on the filing cabinet near Ross Reynold's desk, so we asked Matthew to explain.

In 2010, there were headlines around the world that a South Korean couple had let their 3-month-old daughter starve to death while they spent up to 12 hours a day playing “Prius Online” at a local internet cafe.

Ironically, in “Prius,” players take care of an “anima,” a child-like character, so the couple was neglecting their real life child to care for a virtual one.

But the courts found that the couple suffered from an addiction to the Internet and gave them minimal jail time.

Among the great promises of the Internet were free expression and community — that you or I can make things and share them with ease, and that we can more easily connect with weirdos just like us.

The Associated Press today offers "a more sober picture" than it and other news organizations (including NPR) did earlier this month regarding reports of nearly 800 bodies of infants and young children at a former Catholic home for unwed mothers in Ireland.

Three journalists who work for the Al-Jazeera news network have been sentenced to prison terms — two lasting seven years and a third lasting 10 — by an Egyptian court. The three were accused of aiding terrorists, a term that in this case applies to the banned Muslim Brotherhood.

From Egypt's Ahram Online:

Flickr Photo/Andreas Eldh (CC-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde interviews author David Zweig about his new book, "Invisibles: The Power Of Anonymous Work In An Age of Relentless Self-Promotion."

Flickr Photo/Giulia Forsythe/Cathy N Davidson (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Marcie Sillman talks with cognitive scientist-turned-science-writer, Christian Jarrett, about brain science research and why consumers need to bring a skeptical eye to the neuroscience headlines.

How The Media Can Help Prevent Mass Shootings

Jun 10, 2014
Flickr Photo/Travis S.

Forensic psychologist Dr. Park Dietz worries the media has encouraged copycats of mass shootings. Recently, there have been two college shootings in as many weeks.

“The longer we continue the coverage, the more colorful, emotionally-arousing and biographical about the shooter that coverage is, the more imitators we’ll attract,” Dietz told KUOW’s Marcie Sillman on The Record. Sillman spoke with Dietz on Friday, the day after a shooting at Seattle Pacific University left one dead and three wounded.

In journalism school, student reporters learn to never, ever, ever name suspects until they have been charged in court.

Credit Wikimedia Commons

When the Americans entered World War II in 1944, reporters joined their ranks. Women, however, were not allowed.

Flickr Photo/Ricky Montalvo (Cc-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Ira Glass, host of This American Life, about his career and the art of radio storytelling.

Flickr Photo/Jason Howie (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with Seattle author Maria Semple about why she thinks social media is the biggest threat to writing and art since Peter Criss' first solo album.

From Wikipedia

It’s no secret that radio in the early days was a man’s game. Men were the directors, the producers, the composers and the sound effect technicians. But it was a woman who was a major influence in the sound effects profession.

Alain de Botton's book "The News."

Marcie Sillman talks with Alain de Botton about his latest book on modern philosophy and life, "The News: A User's Manual."

Flickr Photo/West McGowan (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with UCLA professor Sean Young about his new study that links language used in tweets with high rates of HIV infection.

This post was updated at 10:30 a.m. ET on March 6.

Facebook said Wednesday that it will limit minors' access to pages and posts that offer firearms for sale, along with other measures intended to curtail illegal gun trafficking.

"This is something we've been working on for a while," says Facebook spokesman Matt Steinfeld. "We want to balance the interests of people who come here to express themselves while promoting an environment that is safe and respectful."

For most of us, our smartphones have become our figurative lifelines. For state troopers their literal lifeline is still the two-way radio.

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

The Seattle Seahawks booked their ticket to the Super Bowl by winning the NFC Championship on Sunday, but not without some controversy.

When Erin Andrews of Fox Sports grabbed Seattle cornerback Richard Sherman for a post-game interview, he looked right into the camera and said, “I’m the best corner in the game and when you try me against a sorry receiver like Crabtree that’s the results you going to get.”

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