media and journalism | KUOW News and Information

media and journalism

Richard Sher, host of Says You, left, and KUOW Programming Director Jeff Hansen, in the spring of 2014. They are standing on Sher's favorite spot in a gated cemetery in Boston.
Courtesy of Jeff Hansen

Phyllis Fletcher, Managing Editor, Northwest News Network:

"It’s not important to know the answers. You just have to like the answers.”

I hoped to see Richard Sher again – and I assumed it would be soon. He brought his show “Says You” to the Puget Sound area at least once a year. I wanted to come back to at least sit in the audience or maybe even be picked as a panelist again.

They made it look so easy — and for me it wasn't! But Richard's enthusiasm for the whole enterprise of “Says You” was infectious. I particularly liked seeing how much he enjoyed the kids who helped out on this night by keeping score and that he wanted them to feel special. 

The subject of the popular public radio "Serial" podcast, who was convicted as a teenager 15 years ago in the murder of his ex-girlfriend, has been granted an appeal.

The Maryland Court of Special Appeals has granted the request for review from Adnan Syed, whose case has been examined in-depth in the podcasts, which raised questions about his guilt.

Today marks the return of a cult public television hit — Foyle's War. It previously appeared as part of PBS's big Sunday night Masterpiece lineup, but it won't be on TV tonight. For now, viewers will have to stream the show digitally. Acorn, the company that produces Foyle's War, has embarked on something of a Netflix strategy — raising the question of whether a niche pay portal can be a going concern.

Ivy Huang and Terry Weng host a show on a recent
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

When Yunfei Zhao first arrived at the University of Washington, he felt like he was mostly prepared.

“I learned how to check out a book in the library in my English class back in China,” he said. “I learned how to greet people; I learned how to find my way someplace.”

Then he got hungry.

Two teenagers in Kivalina, Alaska, play near a skinned polar bear. Scientists predict Kivalina, an Alaskan village, will be the first casualty of climate change and sea rising in the U.S.
Suzanne Tennant

I first heard of Kivalina, a sliver of an island in far northwest Alaska, when I was looking for a photo project.

It appealed in part because of this one startling fact: Scientists believe that Kivalina, population 457, will be the first casualty of climate change in the U.S., and that it will be inundated by sea water by 2025. That’s in just a decade.

Sports. TV shows. Daily news. All grist for online arguments. (Not to mention culture, politics, race and feminism.)

Now, everyday people can communicate directly with people in news stories, celebrities and activists on social media. But not every conversation works on every platform. We're getting more sophisticated about choosing where we say things online.

A frequent sight in our newsroom: Business reporter Carolyn Adolph arguing with Siri, the iPhone personal assistant.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Dear KUOW listeners,

We apologize for the inconvenience several of you experienced recently when listening to a story about distracted driving and Siri, the personal assistant who lives inside the iPhone.

Public broadcasters are calling on the U.S. Forest Service to make a number of changes in its regulation of photography, filming and recording on public lands.

Several public media organizations jointly submitted comments Wednesday (PDF) to the Forest Service. That agency is considering a proposed directive that would require permits to film, photograph, and record in wilderness areas.

Did host Scott Simon unfairly—and sordidly—ambush Bill Cosby by raising rape charges in a Weekend Edition interview that was otherwise about art?

The 77-year old comedian and wife Camille—she was present—were being interviewed on air Saturday about the many pieces of art that they are lending to the Smithsonian Museum when Simon, at the end, changed the subject:

Street Newspapers On The Rise In The Northwest

Nov 14, 2014

In every major West Coast city, people who are homeless or living in transitional housing are selling street newspapers on the corners.

Balloons and flowers at an impromptu memorial at Marysville Pilchuck High School the Monday after a school shooting on Friday, Oct. 24.
KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

Jeannie Yandel talks with journalist Dave Cullen, the author of the book "Columbine," about how he saw false explanations for the Columbine shooting affect national policy, and why he urges media and friends of Marysville community members alike to take their time trying to work through the causes of the shooting.

At most news organizations, journalists celebrate when they get a story in print, on air or online.

At Storyful, editors high-five when they knock a story down.

"We like to think about [Storyful] as the first social news agency," said Mark Little, the company's buoyant CEO. A former television news anchor and correspondent in his native Ireland, Little conceived the company in 2009 after watching the documentation of mounting protests in Iran posted to Flickr and YouTube.

Facebook

Within hours of the school shooting in Marysville that left two students dead – including the shooter – Seattle venture capitalist Nick Hanauer posted a link to a story about the shooting with this caption: “We need more school shootings!!! Vote yes on Initiative 591.”

In the aftermath of disasters like earthquakes, fires and severe weather events, the rush to both alert and check on family and friends can crash telecommunications networks. During the freak 2011 Virginia earthquake, which rattled the nation's capital and damaged the Washington Monument, panicked phone calls quickly overloaded the phone network.

Facebook's newest tool, known as Safety Check, aims to allow people to quickly alert friends and family that they are safe after a natural disaster.

Hong Kong media are providing wall-to-wall coverage of the protests calling for the resignation of Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying, but in mainland China there has been little to no mention of the unrest.

The contrast is an illustration of the "one country, two systems" policy that has been in place since the former British colony reverted to Chinese rule in 1997.

Vermont is known for its green pastures, farmsteads and roads free of billboards. The founders of the new social network Ello live in the state, and they want to bring Vermont-like serenity to the Internet.

"We set out to prove that a social network will survive and thrive that doesn't have a business model of selling ads to its users," says CEO and co-founder Paul Budnitz.

The U.S. Forest Service is developing a rule that would let it decide whether the media could film or take photos in wilderness areas.

Talk about a take-this-job and shove it moment: During last night's local news broadcast, a reporter for KTVA-TV in Alaska did two pretty stunning things.

First, after reporting on the efforts of the Alaska Cannabis Club, Charlo Greene revealed she was the club's owner. And then, realizing the kind of ethical dilemma that put her in, she quit on live television.

Flickr Photo/Jo Morrill (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Leonard Garfield, director of the Museum of History and Industry, about MOHAI's efforts to find a new home for the landmark P-I globe.

For more than 40 years, a radio station called the “Evergreen Radio Reading Service” has been broadcasting all day, everyday across Washington State for the "print disabled" -- people who are visually impaired or unable to hold or turn a page.

This week, we’ll be examining Washington's freshest crop - marijuana. The agriculture, the security and the personalities.

Screenshot by Keva Andersen

The subject headline of producer Matthew Streib's email was irresistibly public radio: "There is fresh raw Nigerian pygmy goat's milk in the fridge." 

Typically we hear about free doughnuts on the filing cabinet near Ross Reynold's desk, so we asked Matthew to explain.

In 2010, there were headlines around the world that a South Korean couple had let their 3-month-old daughter starve to death while they spent up to 12 hours a day playing “Prius Online” at a local internet cafe.

Ironically, in “Prius,” players take care of an “anima,” a child-like character, so the couple was neglecting their real life child to care for a virtual one.

But the courts found that the couple suffered from an addiction to the Internet and gave them minimal jail time.

Among the great promises of the Internet were free expression and community — that you or I can make things and share them with ease, and that we can more easily connect with weirdos just like us.

The Associated Press today offers "a more sober picture" than it and other news organizations (including NPR) did earlier this month regarding reports of nearly 800 bodies of infants and young children at a former Catholic home for unwed mothers in Ireland.

Three journalists who work for the Al-Jazeera news network have been sentenced to prison terms — two lasting seven years and a third lasting 10 — by an Egyptian court. The three were accused of aiding terrorists, a term that in this case applies to the banned Muslim Brotherhood.

From Egypt's Ahram Online:

Flickr Photo/Andreas Eldh (CC-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde interviews author David Zweig about his new book, "Invisibles: The Power Of Anonymous Work In An Age of Relentless Self-Promotion."

Flickr Photo/Giulia Forsythe/Cathy N Davidson (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Marcie Sillman talks with cognitive scientist-turned-science-writer, Christian Jarrett, about brain science research and why consumers need to bring a skeptical eye to the neuroscience headlines.

How The Media Can Help Prevent Mass Shootings

Jun 10, 2014
Flickr Photo/Travis S.

Forensic psychologist Dr. Park Dietz worries the media has encouraged copycats of mass shootings. Recently, there have been two college shootings in as many weeks.

“The longer we continue the coverage, the more colorful, emotionally-arousing and biographical about the shooter that coverage is, the more imitators we’ll attract,” Dietz told KUOW’s Marcie Sillman on The Record. Sillman spoke with Dietz on Friday, the day after a shooting at Seattle Pacific University left one dead and three wounded.

In journalism school, student reporters learn to never, ever, ever name suspects until they have been charged in court.

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