media and journalism | KUOW News and Information

media and journalism

Roger Ailes, the CEO and chairman of Fox News, is stepping down from his role. Rupert Murdoch will be taking over as chairman and acting CEO.

Ailes "has resigned from his role effective immediately," according to a statement from parent company 21st Century Fox.

This week, actress and comedian Leslie Jones quit Twitter after receiving a barrage of targeted racist, sexist and otherwise abusive messages following the release of the all-female remake of Ghostbusters.

The Murdoch family is moving to oust the chairman of Fox News Channel after multiple women have accused him of sexual harassment, NPR's David Folkenflik reports.

Roger Ailes is the co-founder, chairman and CEO of the news channel. Multiple sources at Fox News tell David that the Murdochs, who are controlling owners of parent company 21st Century Fox, are moving to push Ailes out of his prominent, powerful role.

21st Century Fox released this statement: "Roger is at work. The review is ongoing. The only agreement that is in place is his existing employment agreement."

In four months, on the first Friday after the elections in November, Renee Montagne will step away from the host chair on Morning Edition after 12 years.

That's 12 years of arriving at work every weekday at midnight. Montagne works out of the NPR West studio in Culver City, Calif., on the outskirts of Los Angeles. That means at 2 a.m. PT, she's sounding bright and fully caffeinated for Morning Edition's earliest East Coast broadcasts. Her punishing hours were a point of pride — but only to a point.

The past few days may mark the moment at which the interests of Fox News and its charismatic chairman, Roger Ailes, diverge from those of its parent company, 21st Century Fox, and the Murdoch family that controls it.

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the#NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

From Digital News Intern Gabriel Rosenberg:

I'll happily admit to a longtime HGTV addiction. But I have a much more complicated relationship with the tiny-house shows that now fill those sort of channels.

Suki Kim spent 10 years researching and visiting North Korea. In 2011, she spent six months teaching at a university in Pyongyang — and working undercover as a journalist.

During that time, Kim secretly documented the lives of 270 of North Korea's elite — young men who were being groomed as the country's future leaders — at the center of the country's regime change.

Egypt deports TV host as Sisi's crackdown on dissent continues

Jun 30, 2016
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The Egyptian Presidency

Until Monday, Liliane Daoud was a host for the Egyptian TV station ONTV.

But that changed when eight plainclothes police officers showed up at her house in Cairo and arrested her. She asked that they show her their IDs but they refused. She was taken straight to the airport and put on a plane to Beirut — deported out of the country she has called home for the past five years.

Months after he was granted a new hearing because of new evidence, Adnan Syed, whose 2000 murder conviction was a key focus of the hit podcast Serial, has been granted a new trial, according to his attorneys.

Baltimore City Circuit Judge Martin Welch vacated Syed's conviction, saying in a memorandum that his attorney "fell below the standard of reasonable professional judgment" in handling his case.

Announcing the news Thursday, attorney Justin Brown tweeted in all-caps: "WE WON A NEW TRIAL FOR ADNAN SYED!!!"

Ellie Suastez chats with Bill Radke at the KUOW studios.`
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Bill Radke speaks with Abe Suastez and his six-year-old daughter Ellie about her Seattle-based podcast, Ellie's Podcast 11. Ellie has interviewed a violinist with the Seattle Symphony, female firefighters and even Santa Claus.  

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump announced Monday he was revoking press credentials for The Washington Post, upset with the major newspaper's coverage of his campaign.

The action from the Trump campaign is the latest in a string of moves Trump's campaign has made to ban reporters and news outlets that, in the mind of the billionaire businessman, have not treated him fairly.

Gawker Media, the gossip and news company that lost a high-profile court case in which it was ordered to pay $140 million over a violation of Hulk Hogan's privacy, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection from its creditors.

In addition to its eponymous website, Gawker operates several other popular sites, including Deadspin, Jezebel and Gizmodo. But reports out Friday also said Gawker's founder, Nick Denton, was trying to find a buyer for the company.

Update at 2:30 p.m. ET: Gawker Confirms Ziff Davis Deal

Zabihullah Tamanna, the Afghan journalist who was killed on Sunday along with NPR photojournalist David Gilkey, has been laid to rest in Kabul, Afghanistan.

Zabihullah and David died when the armored Humvee they were riding in, part of an Afghan military convoy, was struck by a rocket-propelled grenade fired by Taliban militants. NPR's Tom Bowman and Monika Evstatieva were riding in a different vehicle in the convoy, and were not injured in the attack.

studio record
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

A group hoping to buy the public radio station KPLU from Pacific Lutheran University announced Thursday that it’s raised the money to do so.

General manager Joey Cohn delivered the news on-air with supporters cheering in the background. Reaching the $7 million goal paves the way for the group Friends of 88.5 FM to enter negotiations with PLU. If they reach a sale agreement, the previous offer from KUOW will be terminated.

The University of Washington and KUOW officials worked to keep the acquisition of public radio station KPLU secret, according to a Seattle Times report.

The story says the deal was intentionally described in vague language on an agenda for a UW Board of Regents meeting. The Times story revealed that UW and Pacific Lutheran University officials tried to keep details under wraps for months until they were ready to announce it publicly.

Facebook and a top Republican Senator have responded to allegations from the tech website Gizmodo that Facebook is suppressing ideologically conservative news or stories from conservative organizations from its "trending topics" column.

So here we are. Noisily embraced by the plurality of Republican voters, not-so-quietly reviled by most Republican leaders, Donald Trump is all but assured that party's presidential nomination.

Journalists astonished at the result — and believe me, most are stunned by what has unfolded — find themselves confronted by some form of this question: Are the media to blame for Donald Trump?

Bill Buzenberg and Ross Reynolds
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Digital media and the World Wide Web have disrupted media, decimating the newspaper business and upending other legacy media outlets. After years of strong growth is digital disruption finally reaching public radio? Some question whether NPR can survive. Others feel the public radio collaboration between radio stations and the network is fraying.

In this interview recorded at Town Hall in Seattle, May 3, Ross Reynolds speaks with the former head of NPR news, Bill Buzenberg.

Jean Enersen at TEDx Kirkland 2015.
Flickr Photo/TEDx Kirkland (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/sfDTjT

Lisa Brooks talks to Jean Enersen, former anchor and reporter for KING 5 News, about her career in Seattle.

A state representative admits he's not one of the cool kids and nobody wants to sit by him on an airplane full of lawmakers.

A rancher tells of a wildfire so out of control, flames jumped and reached across a highway.

Santa and Mrs. Claus are introduced to a room full of refugees in English and Arabic.

These stories and more from our reporters were awarded six honors Saturday from the Idaho Press Club, recognizing the best Idaho journalism in 2015.

In the 100th year of the Pulitzer Prize, The Associated Press' global reporting called "Seafood from Slaves" won the award for public service.

The series of stories chronicled how the fishing industry was using slave labor to put seafood in American kitchens and restaurants.

When they wouldn't hire her because she was a woman, she threatened her superiors. When the media asked her a stupid question, she gave them an earful. And when she thought she had contracted HIV/AIDS, she said, "if that's what happened, that's what happened."

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Afolabi Sotunde/Reuters

Two years after the Islamist group Boko Haram kidnapped 276 girls from a school in Chibok, Nigeria, the girls are still missing.

On Thursday, however, we got our first glimpse of a few of them in a new video — renewing hopes that not only are they missing, at least some are still alive.

NPR political correspondent Mara Liasson speaking at KUOW studios on March 31, 2016.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

NPR national politics correspondent Mara Liasson spoke March 31 at Seattle Town Hall about political trends in this election cycle. 

She was then joined by a panel of local communications experts to discuss the challenges news organizations and journalists face in a shifting media landscape. The panel included: Seattle Times editor Kathy Best, KUOW president and general manager Caryn Mathes, GeekWire co-founder John Cook and Providence Health Services and Swedish Hospital executive Dan Dixon.

HBO's new movie Confirmation chronicles the intense confirmation battle for Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas after Anita Hill, a former employee, claimed he sexually harassed her.

NPR's Nina Totenberg broke the story to the world in 1991, and she joins the NPR Politics podcast team to reflect on what happened, how it happened and why it still matters.

Bill Radke speaks with Bainbridge Island resident Bill Buzenberg about the Panama Papers leak. Buzenberg is the former head of the Center for Public Integrity, which runs the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists that broke this story. Buzenberg was involved with the beginning of this investigation. 

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun Columnist Vaughn Palmer about the sexual assault trial of former CBC host, Jian Ghomeshi.

A Canadian court has acquitted Jian Ghomeshi, the former CBC radio host who was fired in 2014 amid multiple allegations of sexual assault.

In this case, which involved complaints from three different women regarding incidents in 2002 and 2003, Ghomeshi was charged with four counts of sexual assault and one count of overcoming resistance to sexual assault by choking.

Washington State University announced Monday that our Richland Correspondent Anna King is WSU Woman of the Year for 2016.

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